cool-critters

cool-critters:

Gray slender opossum (Marmosops incanus)

The Gray Slender Opossum is an opossum species from South America. It is found in Brazil. The Marmosops in generel prefer to live on the grounds of forests, staying away from high branches of trees.

They often hide in the dense understory with high plant coverage surrounding them. They are highly influenced by rain and predation, with migration occurring more often during certain seasons.

The diet of Marmosops consists of a variety of things. This includes, but is not limited to fruit, arthropods, flowers and small vertebrates. They also will eat insects, arachnids, and gastropods depending on the species and time of the year.

photo credits: Ramon Campos, Hans Ulrich Bernard, redorbit,

North American Field Crickets
Summer nights are filled with the sound of field crickets (family Gryllidae). 
Many species are so visually similar they are best identified by their chirps. The sound is produced by rubbing the sharp edge of one forewing (usually the right one) against rough teeth spaced along a vein on the other; only males have these structures. 
Females have special “eardrums” on their forelegs called tympanum, with which they detect the calls of males. Female crickets can be distinguished from males by the presence of an ovipositor that they lay eggs under the soil with - males have only two appendages on the abdomen, while females have three (the long central one is the ovipositor; this is a female). 
Field crickets are omnivorous, feeding on seeds, fruit, and small insects, including the eggs of other invertebrates.photo by Mr.TinDC on Flickr
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

North American Field Crickets

Summer nights are filled with the sound of field crickets (family Gryllidae).

Many species are so visually similar they are best identified by their chirps. The sound is produced by rubbing the sharp edge of one forewing (usually the right one) against rough teeth spaced along a vein on the other; only males have these structures.

Females have special “eardrums” on their forelegs called tympanum, with which they detect the calls of males. Female crickets can be distinguished from males by the presence of an ovipositor that they lay eggs under the soil with - males have only two appendages on the abdomen, while females have three (the long central one is the ovipositor; this is a female).

Field crickets are omnivorous, feeding on seeds, fruit, and small insects, including the eggs of other invertebrates.

photo by Mr.TinDC on Flickr

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

Redwood National and State Parks (NPS) - CA, USA:
There are many different types of berries in the forests of Redwood NSP. Some, like blackberries and thimbleberries, are edible and can be collected in modest amounts. 
Others, however, are NOT to be eaten. Pictured here is clintonia, also known as bluebead lily for obvious and colorful reasons. Its vibrant, almost unnaturally blue berries may look tasty, but make no mistake- eating them may leave you with a painful stomach-ache!

There are many different types of berries in the forests of Redwood NSP. Some, like blackberries and thimbleberries, are edible and can be collected in modest amounts.

Others, however, are NOT to be eaten. Pictured here is clintonia, also known as bluebead lily for obvious and colorful reasons. Its vibrant, almost unnaturally blue berries may look tasty, but make no mistake- eating them may leave you with a painful stomach-ache!

While messing around with the Celebrity Tomatoes, I came across this little fellow, who appears in my garden every year around this time, an Obscure Bird Grasshopper (Schistocerca obscura), Houston, TX, USA. I kept seeing him around for the next few days, in different locations.

http://ninnescahlife.wichita.edu/node/705

http://bugguide.net/node/view/5009

http://www.austinbug.com/larvalbug/beast/archbeast9-09.html

Brachiopods are actually a PHYLUM of animals. That’s right a whole GROUP of animals that most folks have probably never heard of!

Brachiopods are a very old, old group of invertebrates with a relatively rich fossil record.  They have two shells (and are superficially similar to bivalves, e.g; clams and mussels) but are better known in several other ways…

libutron
libutron:

Olive House Snake
Boaedon olivaceus (Lamprophiidae) is a species of House snake native to west and central Africa, with a complex taxonomic history, which until 2011 was assigned to the widespread genus Lamprophis.
Olive House Snakes are small, non venomous colubrids sexually dimorphic in that females grow significantly larger than males (Males 50 - 70cm and females 70 - 100cm). The name “House Snake” was given as they are often found around houses and other buildings looking for food.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Konrad Mebert | Locality: Banalia-Longala, Democratic Republic of the Congo

libutron:

Olive House Snake

Boaedon olivaceus (Lamprophiidae) is a species of House snake native to west and central Africa, with a complex taxonomic history, which until 2011 was assigned to the widespread genus Lamprophis.

Olive House Snakes are small, non venomous colubrids sexually dimorphic in that females grow significantly larger than males (Males 50 - 70cm and females 70 - 100cm). The name “House Snake” was given as they are often found around houses and other buildings looking for food.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Konrad Mebert | Locality: Banalia-Longala, Democratic Republic of the Congo