Delmarva Peninsula Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger cinereus) 
ENDANGERED
(from USFWS fact sheet)
The Delmarva Peninsula fox squirrel is named for the area defining most of its historic range: the peninsula between the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean that includes Delaware, eastern Maryland and eastern Virginia. This subspecies of fox squirrel historically occurred throughout the peninsula and into Pennsylvania.
By 1967, they inhabited only 10% of the Delmarva Peninsula and were placed on the first endangered species list. Forest clearing for agriculture, timber harvest and hunting at the turn of the century contributed to their decline. Recovery efforts are helping to turn the tide and now the population range is expanding.

(photo: USFWS)
It can grow to 30 inches (with half of that being the tail) and can weigh 1 to 3 pounds. The squirrel’s coat is typically a frosty silver-gray color but can vary in color to almost black. The only other tree squirrel on the Delmarva Peninsula is the common gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) which is often seen in backyard bird feeders and suburban settings. The widespread gray squirrel is smaller (16 to 20 inches), has a narrower tail and brownish gray fur…
(read more: USFWS - Chesapeake Bay)     (top photo: Larry Meade)

Delmarva Peninsula Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger cinereus

ENDANGERED

(from USFWS fact sheet)

The Delmarva Peninsula fox squirrel is named for the area defining most of its historic range: the peninsula between the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean that includes Delaware, eastern Maryland and eastern Virginia. This subspecies of fox squirrel historically occurred throughout the peninsula and into Pennsylvania.

By 1967, they inhabited only 10% of the Delmarva Peninsula and were placed on the first endangered species list. Forest clearing for agriculture, timber harvest and hunting at the turn of the century contributed to their decline. Recovery efforts are helping to turn the tide and now the population range is expanding.

(photo: USFWS)

It can grow to 30 inches (with half of that being the tail) and can weigh 1 to 3 pounds. The squirrel’s coat is typically a frosty silver-gray color but can vary in color to almost black. The only other tree squirrel on the Delmarva Peninsula is the common gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) which is often seen in backyard bird feeders and suburban settings. The widespread gray squirrel is smaller (16 to 20 inches), has a narrower tail and brownish gray fur…

(read more: USFWS - Chesapeake Bay)     (top photo: Larry Meade)

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