Cajun Crayfish Invading Africa, Eating Native Species
by Ochieng’ Ogodo
It’s a far cry from Cajun country, but a U.S. crayfish used  in Southern cooking is now eating its way across Africa, scientists say. Without  any native predators to keep it in check, the Louisiana crayfish, also  known as the red swamp crayfish, is gobbling up small freshwater fish, fish eggs, mollusks, crustaceans, and aquatic plants.
The 6 in. long (15 cm) invader is already widely distributed in lakes and other bodies of water throughout Kenya, as well as in Rwanda, Uganda, Egypt, Zambia, the Seychelles, Mauritius, and South Africa. Conservationists  are now concerned the crayfish will reach the East African lakes of  Malawi, Tanganyika, and Victoria, which are home to hundreds—and  probably thousands—of species found nowhere else.
"By  removing animals and plants from wetlands, [the crayfish] can upset the  balance of ecosystems and reduce valuable ecosystem functions," said Geoffrey Howard,  global coordinator for invasive species for the Species Programme of  the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)…
(read more: National Geo)    
(photo: David Keith Jones, Images of Africa Photobank/Alamy)

Cajun Crayfish Invading Africa, Eating Native Species

by Ochieng’ Ogodo

It’s a far cry from Cajun country, but a U.S. crayfish used in Southern cooking is now eating its way across Africa, scientists say. Without any native predators to keep it in check, the Louisiana crayfish, also known as the red swamp crayfish, is gobbling up small freshwater fish, fish eggs, mollusks, crustaceans, and aquatic plants.

The 6 in. long (15 cm) invader is already widely distributed in lakes and other bodies of water throughout Kenya, as well as in RwandaUgandaEgypt, Zambia, the SeychellesMauritius, and South Africa. Conservationists are now concerned the crayfish will reach the East African lakes of Malawi, Tanganyika, and Victoria, which are home to hundreds—and probably thousands—of species found nowhere else.

"By removing animals and plants from wetlands, [the crayfish] can upset the balance of ecosystems and reduce valuable ecosystem functions," said Geoffrey Howard, global coordinator for invasive species for the Species Programme of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)…

(read more: National Geo)    

(photo: David Keith Jones, Images of Africa Photobank/Alamy)

  1. kujakuramblings reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  2. miraclemayhem reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  3. marshhawkrr reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  4. peanutbutterpolarbear reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  5. magicalnaturesstuff reblogged this from rhamphotheca and added:
    Crayfish are lots of trouble to eat, but I love them. They are very popular where I live. :)
  6. jsetayes17 reblogged this from rhamphotheca and added:
    Ate this for dinner last night. Get some *fist bump*
  7. rhamphotheca posted this