via NPR News

Rhino poaching has been on the rise in the past few years. In South Africa and other regions where rhinos run, poachers have been killing or darting rhinos with tranquilizers for their horns.

Rather than adorning walls, many horns are ground up into medicines, sold mostly in Southeast Asia. A possible — yet controversial — way to stop poaching may be rhino ranches, where the horns are harvested for sale and the animals are allowed to grow new ones.

National Geographic staff writer Peter Gwin reports on the legal and illegal rhino horn trade in the magazine’s March issue. He is also the author of an upcoming e-book, Rhino Wars: The Violent Underworld of Poachers and Black Market Medicine.

(click through title to listen to the interview and see pictures)

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    Rhino poaching has been on the rise in the past few years. In South Africa and other regions where rhinos run, poachers...
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