Ancient Giant Trees Petrified in Thailand
by Larry O’Hanlon
Fossil trees that approached the heights of today’s tallest redwoods have been found in northern Thailand. The longest petrified log measures 72.2 m (237 ft), which suggest the original tree towered to more than 100 m (330 ft) in a wet tropical forest some 800,000 years ago.
The trees appear to have been closely related to a species alive today called Koompassia elegans, which belongs to the same family as beans, peas and black locust trees, explained lead author of the study, Marc Philippe of France’s University of Lyon. That is to say, the ancient trees are not closely related to today’s tallest trees, which are the Eucalyptus (gum trees) of Australia and Sequoia (redwoods) of California. Both of those living trees can reach about 130 m (425 ft) in height.
Interestingly, there are no trees living today in Thailand that approach the size of the ancients. “Highest trees nowadays in Thailand are almost 60 m(200 ft),” wrote Philippe in response to my email query about his new paper coming out in the April issue of the journal Quaternary Science Reviews. ”To my knowledge the highest tree yet recorded in Thailand is a Krabak tree, belonging to the Dipterocarpaceae (‘tropical oaks’), 58 m(190 ft) tall.”…
(read more: Our Amazing Planet)
(images:  Marc Philippe, Université de Lyon)

Ancient Giant Trees Petrified in Thailand

by Larry O’Hanlon

Fossil trees that approached the heights of today’s tallest redwoods have been found in northern Thailand. The longest petrified log measures 72.2 m (237 ft), which suggest the original tree towered to more than 100 m (330 ft) in a wet tropical forest some 800,000 years ago.

The trees appear to have been closely related to a species alive today called Koompassia elegans, which belongs to the same family as beans, peas and black locust trees, explained lead author of the study, Marc Philippe of France’s University of Lyon. That is to say, the ancient trees are not closely related to today’s tallest trees, which are the Eucalyptus (gum trees) of Australia and Sequoia (redwoods) of California. Both of those living trees can reach about 130 m (425 ft) in height.

Interestingly, there are no trees living today in Thailand that approach the size of the ancients. “Highest trees nowadays in Thailand are almost 60 m(200 ft),” wrote Philippe in response to my email query about his new paper coming out in the April issue of the journal Quaternary Science Reviews. ”To my knowledge the highest tree yet recorded in Thailand is a Krabak tree, belonging to the Dipterocarpaceae (‘tropical oaks’), 58 m(190 ft) tall.”…

(read more: Our Amazing Planet)

(images:  Marc Philippe, Université de Lyon)

  1. paleobotanicalthesis reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  2. floralkriterion reblogged this from thehopefulbotanymajor
  3. drunkenessofthewavess reblogged this from com-pound
  4. com-pound reblogged this from thehopefulbotanymajor
  5. absurdiverum reblogged this from thehopefulbotanymajor
  6. thehopefulbotanymajor reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  7. cardinellian reblogged this from somuchscience
  8. ballpointpencil reblogged this from nybg
  9. tamikaflynned reblogged this from hoomanao
  10. sempergratia reblogged this from nybg
  11. miyajii reblogged this from yowaimono
  12. yowaimono reblogged this from nybg
  13. hoomanao reblogged this from beemill
  14. cremedecaudata reblogged this from nybg
  15. daisyadilla reblogged this from nybg
  16. mira-weasley reblogged this from ravenmacduff
  17. ravenmacduff reblogged this from call-me-maurice
  18. chdp reblogged this from nybg
  19. the-lost-greek reblogged this from connectingwiththeworld
  20. connectingwiththeworld reblogged this from nybg and added:
    Yoko would be extremely interested.
  21. ma-cachet reblogged this from nybg
  22. pouchtitties reblogged this from nybg