Fish Use ‘Sign Language’ to Help Out Hunting Buddies
by Douglas Main
Two types of fish have been shown to use gestures, or sign language, to help one another hunt. This is the first time these types of gestures have been found to occur in animals other than primates and ravens.

Both types of fish, grouper and coral trout, are known for hunting cooperatively with other kinds of animals. Whereas the grouper hunts with giant moray eels and a fish called the Napoleon wrasse, coral trout partner up with octopuses to snag prey. A study published last week in the journal Nature Communications found that the fish are able to “point” their heads toward prey, to help out their hunting buddies.
After observing the fish in the wild for many hours, the researchers found that when a prey fish escaped its hunting party, a grouper occasionally moved over the place where the fugitive prey was hiding. The grouper would then rotate its body so that its head faced downward, and it would shake its head back and forth in the direction of the potential meal, in what researchers call a “headstand” signal. Coral trout make a similar sign, the researchers found…
(read more: http://www.livescience.com/29120-fish-use-sign-language-to-hunt.html?cmpid=514627)
(photo: Klaus Jost., Univ. of Mich. - ADW)

Fish Use ‘Sign Language’ to Help Out Hunting Buddies

by Douglas Main

Two types of fish have been shown to use gestures, or sign language, to help one another hunt. This is the first time these types of gestures have been found to occur in animals other than primates and ravens.

Both types of fish, grouper and coral trout, are known for hunting cooperatively with other kinds of animals. Whereas the grouper hunts with giant moray eels and a fish called the Napoleon wrasse, coral trout partner up with octopuses to snag prey. A study published last week in the journal Nature Communications found that the fish are able to “point” their heads toward prey, to help out their hunting buddies.

After observing the fish in the wild for many hours, the researchers found that when a prey fish escaped its hunting party, a grouper occasionally moved over the place where the fugitive prey was hiding. The grouper would then rotate its body so that its head faced downward, and it would shake its head back and forth in the direction of the potential meal, in what researchers call a “headstand” signal. Coral trout make a similar sign, the researchers found…

(read more: http://www.livescience.com/29120-fish-use-sign-language-to-hunt.html?cmpid=514627)

(photo: Klaus Jost., Univ. of Mich. - ADW)

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    THis fascinates me. After hearing about this a while ago, I once saw a goldentail and a red hind that appeared to be...
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  13. tropicalshark reblogged this from ichthyologist and added:
    A lot more nicer than farting to communicate like the herring do!
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  20. theletterkilleth reblogged this from ichthyologist and added:
    just buds just fish buds u kno
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