Prairie dogs’ language decoded by scientists
Human-animal translation devices may be available within 10 years, researcher says
via CBC News
Did that prairie dog just call you fat? Quite possibly. On The Current Friday, biologist Con Slobodchikoff described how he learned to understand what prairie dogs are saying to one another and discovered how eloquent they can be.
Slobodchikoff, a professor emeritus at North Arizona University, told Erica Johnson, guest host of The Current, that he started studying prairie dog language 30 years ago after scientists reported that other ground squirrels had different alarm calls to warn each other of flying predators such as hawks and eagles, versus predators on the ground, such as coyotes or badgers.
Hear the full interview with Con Slobodchikoff on The Current
Prairie dogs, he said, were ideal animals to study because they are social animals that live in small co-operative groups within a larger colony, or “town” and they never leave their colony or territory, where they have built an elaborate underground complex of tunnels and burrows…
(read more: CBC News)     (photo: Hyungwon Kang/Reuters)

Prairie dogs’ language decoded by scientists

Human-animal translation devices may be available within 10 years, researcher says

via CBC News

Did that prairie dog just call you fat? Quite possibly. On The Current Friday, biologist Con Slobodchikoff described how he learned to understand what prairie dogs are saying to one another and discovered how eloquent they can be.

Slobodchikoff, a professor emeritus at North Arizona University, told Erica Johnson, guest host of The Current, that he started studying prairie dog language 30 years ago after scientists reported that other ground squirrels had different alarm calls to warn each other of flying predators such as hawks and eagles, versus predators on the ground, such as coyotes or badgers.

Prairie dogs, he said, were ideal animals to study because they are social animals that live in small co-operative groups within a larger colony, or “town” and they never leave their colony or territory, where they have built an elaborate underground complex of tunnels and burrows…

(read more: CBC News)     (photo: Hyungwon Kang/Reuters)

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