Zoologger: The Pint-sized Sabre-toothed Opossum
by Colin Barras
To anyone who has watched a wildlife documentary or gone on safari, it’s only too obvious how the powerful claws and jaws of today’s big cats can combine to devastating effect. Until about 11,000 years ago, though, a different kind of feline prowled the Earth – one with the kind of overbite that no amount of orthodontic work could fix. Our ancestors were probably familiar with the strategy sabre-toothed cats like Smilodon used to put their impressive canines to work, but for evolutionary biologists the giant teeth have always been something of a mystery: no living predator has anything quite like them.
Almost no living predator, that is. There are suggestions that the clouded leopard may show a primitive form of sabre-toothedness – although there is some debate over whether or not its teeth are large enough relative to its skull for it to qualify as a true sabre-toothed cat. But in any case, the leopard is so rare and poorly studied that its hunting behaviour is almost as much of a mystery as that of the extinct cats.
Then there’s the South American  short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis dimidiata). This animal is clearly not a cat. In fact, as a marsupial, a class of mammals that keep their young in a pouch, it’s a very long way from the cat family in evolutionary terms. But could the 10-centimetre-long creature be the best living equivalent of sabre-toothed cats? …
(read more: New Scientist)
photo by Paulo Ricardo de Oliveira Roth

Zoologger: The Pint-sized Sabre-toothed Opossum

by Colin Barras

To anyone who has watched a wildlife documentary or gone on safari, it’s only too obvious how the powerful claws and jaws of today’s big cats can combine to devastating effect. Until about 11,000 years ago, though, a different kind of feline prowled the Earth – one with the kind of overbite that no amount of orthodontic work could fix. Our ancestors were probably familiar with the strategy sabre-toothed cats like Smilodon used to put their impressive canines to work, but for evolutionary biologists the giant teeth have always been something of a mystery: no living predator has anything quite like them.

Almost no living predator, that is. There are suggestions that the clouded leopard may show a primitive form of sabre-toothedness – although there is some debate over whether or not its teeth are large enough relative to its skull for it to qualify as a true sabre-toothed cat. But in any case, the leopard is so rare and poorly studied that its hunting behaviour is almost as much of a mystery as that of the extinct cats.

Then there’s the South American short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis dimidiata). This animal is clearly not a cat. In fact, as a marsupial, a class of mammals that keep their young in a pouch, it’s a very long way from the cat family in evolutionary terms. But could the 10-centimetre-long creature be the best living equivalent of sabre-toothed cats? …

(read more: New Scientist)

photo by Paulo Ricardo de Oliveira Roth

  1. bxlxlane reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  2. artemiswisdom reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  3. im-a-bottom reblogged this from wolffeeder
  4. wolffeeder reblogged this from naturistnaturalist
  5. yaoi-lover-sama reblogged this from shiisa
  6. dracadancer reblogged this from laboratoryequipment
  7. shiisa reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  8. siverw reblogged this from laboratoryequipment
  9. texasdreamer01 reblogged this from laboratoryequipment
  10. brilliantstreet reblogged this from laboratoryequipment
  11. ofthenocti reblogged this from laboratoryequipment
  12. genetische-anomalie reblogged this from laboratoryequipment
  13. king-owl reblogged this from laboratoryequipment
  14. larger-than-life76 reblogged this from laboratoryequipment
  15. laboratoryequipment reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  16. dayglobetty reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  17. professor-panic reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  18. suffering-succotash reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  19. naturistnaturalist reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  20. sleepyheathen reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  21. blooketchup reblogged this from brian-my-left-testicle and added:
    I wonder if Opi’s bite would hurt that badly… Mostly he just opens his mouth at me and then climbs onto my hand lol
  22. peripateticthinker reblogged this from rhamphotheca