Oxygen Brought Earliest Carnivores to Life
by Becky Oskin
Without oxygen, there would be no carnivores. Without carnivores, there would be no Cambrian explosion, the stunning evolutionary burst of diversity in species and body forms that began 540 million years ago.
Those are the findings of a new study that stitches together competing models for why meat-eating appeared simultaneously with the Cambrian explosion. Previously, one camp of scientists had proposed that rising oxygen levels gave animals the extra power to evolve complex body forms. Another school of thought said that competition among animals drove the sudden appearance of new species, such as the weird and wild life forms found in the Burgess Shale, a rock formation in Canada that has been an amazing source of fossils.
"There’s always been this tension," said lead author Erik Sperling, a postdoc at Harvard University. “Each side is looking at their own data, which is often common in science.”…
(read more: Live Science)
illustration - Orthrozanclus reburrus, by Marianne Collins (C) AAAS/Science-2007

Oxygen Brought Earliest Carnivores to Life

by Becky Oskin

Without oxygen, there would be no carnivores. Without carnivores, there would be no Cambrian explosion, the stunning evolutionary burst of diversity in species and body forms that began 540 million years ago.

Those are the findings of a new study that stitches together competing models for why meat-eating appeared simultaneously with the Cambrian explosion. Previously, one camp of scientists had proposed that rising oxygen levels gave animals the extra power to evolve complex body forms. Another school of thought said that competition among animals drove the sudden appearance of new species, such as the weird and wild life forms found in the Burgess Shale, a rock formation in Canada that has been an amazing source of fossils.

"There’s always been this tension," said lead author Erik Sperling, a postdoc at Harvard University. “Each side is looking at their own data, which is often common in science.”…

(read more: Live Science)

illustration - Orthrozanclus reburrus, by Marianne Collins (C) AAAS/Science-2007

  1. a-place-to-stand reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  2. xen0phile reblogged this from whiskey-21
  3. whiskey-21 reblogged this from rhamphotheca and added:
    always reblog Burgess Shale
  4. vanesa reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  5. buildingcapacity reblogged this from scientificillustration
  6. thescientificgap reblogged this from scientificillustration
  7. veganbutt reblogged this from science-poetry-of-reality
  8. en-thalpy reblogged this from science-poetry-of-reality
  9. science-poetry-of-reality reblogged this from proteinsdreamingcodons
  10. proteinsdreamingcodons reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  11. carpinska reblogged this from scientificillustration
  12. theycallmeindy reblogged this from sagansense
  13. tinkerdreaming reblogged this from sagansense
  14. kcsweaters reblogged this from emy2461
  15. buttswana reblogged this from sagansense
  16. theonlysuccessfulone reblogged this from sarkos
  17. emy2461 reblogged this from sagansense
  18. kairi-sea reblogged this from sagansense
  19. laikas-owner reblogged this from sagansense
  20. sarkos reblogged this from sagansense
  21. ofthenocti reblogged this from sagansense
  22. registoal reblogged this from sagansense
  23. the-nuclear-chaos reblogged this from sagansense
  24. sur-quatre-ailes reblogged this from sagansense