Reports in Current Herpetology:
The Anole Community of Lox Tuxtlas, Mexico (The Anole Blog)
by Jonathan Losos, Professor and Curator of Herpetology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University
As part of its ongoing studies of Central and South American anoles, Team Mainland—fresh off successful field work in Colombia and Venezuela earlier this year, traveled to the Veracruz, Mexico to sample that state’s anole fauna. Joined by Anne-Claire Fabre, Victor Jiménez, and Ramón Martínez, Team Mainland worked at the fabled Estación de Biología Tropical Los Tuxtlas, home to eight or nine (depending on which paper you read) species of anoles. The goal of the trip was to characterize the ecology, behavior, and morphology of the species residing at the station. Although all anoles are interesting in their own right, as we know, not all anoles are created equal. And, indeed, there was one special species we had our heart set on seeing: the large aquatic anole, Anolis barkeri…
(read more: Anole Blog)
photograph of A. barkeri by J. Losos

Reports in Current Herpetology:

The Anole Community of Lox Tuxtlas, Mexico (The Anole Blog)

by Jonathan Losos, Professor and Curator of Herpetology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University

As part of its ongoing studies of Central and South American anoles, Team Mainland—fresh off successful field work in Colombia and Venezuela earlier this year, traveled to the Veracruz, Mexico to sample that state’s anole fauna. Joined by Anne-Claire Fabre, Victor Jiménez, and Ramón Martínez, Team Mainland worked at the fabled Estación de Biología Tropical Los Tuxtlas, home to eight or nine (depending on which paper you read) species of anoles. The goal of the trip was to characterize the ecology, behavior, and morphology of the species residing at the station. Although all anoles are interesting in their own right, as we know, not all anoles are created equal. And, indeed, there was one special species we had our heart set on seeing: the large aquatic anole, Anolis barkeri

(read more: Anole Blog)

photograph of A. barkeri by J. Losos

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