Two-Tailed Ancient Bird Uncovered
An ancient dinosaur-era bird turns out to have two tails, one perhaps for flying and the other for showing off.
by Dan Vergano
The early bird gets two tails? A 120-million-year-old bird sported a long tail and a second, unexpected tail frond, paleontologists suggest. The discovery points to a complicated evolutionary path for the tails we see in birds today.
One of the oldest known birds, Jeholornis, lived in what is today China, along with a trove of other feathered dinosaurs discovered in the region over the last decade. It was also thought to sport only a long fan-feathered tail at its back end. Now, however, paleontologists are claiming discovery of a second tail frond adorning the bird. 
"The ‘two-tail’ plumage of Jeholornis is unique,” according to the study, which was led by Jingmai O’Connor of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. The report of the discovery of the tail frond was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences…
(read more: National Geographic)
illustration by Aijuan Shi

Two-Tailed Ancient Bird Uncovered

An ancient dinosaur-era bird turns out to have two tails, one perhaps for flying and the other for showing off.

by Dan Vergano

The early bird gets two tails? A 120-million-year-old bird sported a long tail and a second, unexpected tail frond, paleontologists suggest. The discovery points to a complicated evolutionary path for the tails we see in birds today.

One of the oldest known birds, Jeholornis, lived in what is today China, along with a trove of other feathered dinosaurs discovered in the region over the last decade. It was also thought to sport only a long fan-feathered tail at its back end. Now, however, paleontologists are claiming discovery of a second tail frond adorning the bird.

"The ‘two-tail’ plumage of Jeholornis is unique,” according to the study, which was led by Jingmai O’Connor of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. The report of the discovery of the tail frond was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

(read more: National Geographic)

illustration by Aijuan Shi

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