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Lion-tailed macaque..!! | ©Sachin Shidlingannavar
Lion-tailed macaques, Macaca silenus (Primates - Cercopithecidae) are found only in India, in the Western Ghats mountains.
They are classified as a Endangered species on the IUCN Red List and are also included in Appendix I of CITES.
According to the last evaluation made by the IUCN Red List (ver. 3.1) the total wild population of Macaca silenus is estimated to be less than 4,000 individuals, made up of 47 isolated subpopulations in seven different locations. The macaque in the photo is from a self-sustainable single population of 32 groups of lion-tailed macaques in Sirsi-Honnavara, India.

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Lion-tailed macaque..!! | ©Sachin Shidlingannavar

Lion-tailed macaques, Macaca silenus (Primates - Cercopithecidae) are found only in India, in the Western Ghats mountains.

They are classified as a Endangered species on the IUCN Red List and are also included in Appendix I of CITES.

According to the last evaluation made by the IUCN Red List (ver. 3.1) the total wild population of Macaca silenus is estimated to be less than 4,000 individuals, made up of 47 isolated subpopulations in seven different locations. The macaque in the photo is from a self-sustainable single population of 32 groups of lion-tailed macaques in Sirsi-Honnavara, India.

The Zanzibar red colobus (Procolobus kirkii) is a species of red colobus monkey endemic to Unguja, the main island of the Zanzibar Archipelago, in Tanzania. Brought to attention of Western science by Sir John Kirk, this colobus was first described by John Edward Gray in 1868. It is now considered an endangered species, and extensive conservation efforts have been undertaken since the mid-1990s.
Photograph: juvenile pictured, byHasin Shakur                                         via: WIkipedia

The Zanzibar red colobus (Procolobus kirkii) is a species of red colobus monkey endemic to Unguja, the main island of the Zanzibar Archipelago, in Tanzania. Brought to attention of Western science by Sir John Kirk, this colobus was first described by John Edward Gray in 1868. It is now considered an endangered species, and extensive conservation efforts have been undertaken since the mid-1990s.

Photograph: juvenile pictured, byHasin Shakur                                         via: WIkipedia

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Leontopithecus chrysomelas (in tree) | ©Hans Hillewaert
The Golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas), also known as the Golden-headed tamarin, is a lion tamarin endemic to Brazil. It is found only in the lowland and premontane tropical forest fragments in the state of Bahia, and therefore is considered to be an endangered species.
Mammalia - Primates - Callitrichidae - Leontopithecus - L. chrysomelas

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Leontopithecus chrysomelas (in tree) | ©Hans Hillewaert

The Golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas), also known as the Golden-headed tamarin, is a lion tamarin endemic to Brazil. It is found only in the lowland and premontane tropical forest fragments in the state of Bahia, and therefore is considered to be an endangered species.

Mammalia - Primates - Callitrichidae - LeontopithecusL. chrysomelas

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Macaco-da-noite (Aotus nigriceps) - Peru | ©Cláudio Dias Timm
The Black-headed night monkeys, Aotus nigriceps, are small primates approximately the same size as a small squirrel. They are native to neotropical South America (Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia and Peru).
Animalia - Chordata - Mammalia - Primates - Aotidae - Aotus - A. nigriceps
More information.

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Macaco-da-noite (Aotus nigriceps) - Peru | ©Cláudio Dias Timm

The Black-headed night monkeys, Aotus nigriceps, are small primates approximately the same size as a small squirrel. They are native to neotropical South America (Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia and Peru).

Animalia - Chordata - Mammalia - Primates - Aotidae - Aotus - A. nigriceps

More information.

Video: Female Monkeys Throw Stones To Attract Males
People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones. But the tactic works for female capuchin monkeys who want a male’s attention.
by Douglas Main
To signal their readiness to mate and get males’ attention, some female capuchin monkeys in a Brazilian forest reserve have taken to throwing stones at the objects of their desire. It’s the first time this type of behavior has been witnessed in the wild. To make a scientifically dubious cross-species reference, perhaps they have simply run out of other courtship ideas, like human men honking horns in this Seinfeld bit (at 1:45). More typically, females signal their readiness to mate by pulling pouting faces, whining loudly or touching males and running away. But some female bearded capuchin monkeys in Serra da Capivara National Park have taken this more assertive approach. As the BBC reports…
(read more and watch video: Popular Science)
image: Tiago Falótico and Eduardo B. Ottoni / PLOS ONE

Video: Female Monkeys Throw Stones To Attract Males

People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones. But the tactic works for female capuchin monkeys who want a male’s attention.

by Douglas Main

To signal their readiness to mate and get males’ attention, some female capuchin monkeys in a Brazilian forest reserve have taken to throwing stones at the objects of their desire. It’s the first time this type of behavior has been witnessed in the wild. To make a scientifically dubious cross-species reference, perhaps they have simply run out of other courtship ideas, like human men honking horns in this Seinfeld bit (at 1:45). More typically, females signal their readiness to mate by pulling pouting faces, whining loudly or touching males and running away. But some female bearded capuchin monkeys in Serra da Capivara National Park have taken this more assertive approach. As the BBC reports

(read more and watch video: Popular Science)

image: Tiago Falótico and Eduardo B. Ottoni / PLOS ONE

Snow Monkey Leaps In
by Rowan Hooper
This is the Jigokudani monkey park in Nagano prefecture, Japan. "Jigokudani" means "hell valley" – so called because of the rocky terrain and volcanic springs – although it is actually a rather heavenly place for monkeys.
Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata fuscata) are the only monkeys native to Japan, and live further north than any other non-human primate. Famous for their habit of bathing in hot springs, they can also leap, as can be seen in this shot by US photographer Diane McAllister. The monkeys are strong swimmers, so if the one in this photo didn’t make the leap, it would be fine…
(read more: New Scientist)
photo: Dian McAllsiter

Snow Monkey Leaps In

by Rowan Hooper

This is the Jigokudani monkey park in Nagano prefecture, Japan. "Jigokudani" means "hell valley" – so called because of the rocky terrain and volcanic springs – although it is actually a rather heavenly place for monkeys.

Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata fuscata) are the only monkeys native to Japan, and live further north than any other non-human primate. Famous for their habit of bathing in hot springs, they can also leap, as can be seen in this shot by US photographer Diane McAllister. The monkeys are strong swimmers, so if the one in this photo didn’t make the leap, it would be fine…

(read more: New Scientist)

photo: Dian McAllsiter

ZooBorns:

Pygmy Marmosets are one of the world’s smallest primates, with adults weighing four to five ounces (110-140g) when fully grown.

Native to South America’s upper Amazon basin, Pygmy Marmosets dwell in rain forests and feed primarily on tree gum.  Using specialized teeth, Marmosets gnaw on trees until sap is released, then lick up the sap.  They also feed on insects which are attracted to the sap, as well as fruits and nectar.

photos: Belfast Zoo

(via: ZooBorns)

Cotton-Top Tamarin Survival
More than 1,000 acres of dry forests essential to the survival of the critically endangered Cotton-Top Tamarin Monkey (Saguinus oedipus) have been declared a protected area by the Regional Environmental Authority in Colombia (CARDIQUE).USFWS grantee Fundacion Proyecto Tití played a critical role in the designation of the Parque Natural Regional Bosque Seco El Ceibal-Mono Tití . The grantee has worked to promote Cotton Top Tamarin conservation while increasing sustainable economic activities for rural communities and reducing dependence on income from the illegal pet trade. 
Photo credit: Chase Pickering Learn more about the park in Spanish: http://bit.ly/1fjNemo
Learn more about the Service’s work in Latin America: http://1.usa.gov/1dkc43O
(via: USFWS_International Affairs)

Cotton-Top Tamarin Survival

More than 1,000 acres of dry forests essential to the survival of the critically endangered Cotton-Top Tamarin Monkey (Saguinus oedipus) have been declared a protected area by the Regional Environmental Authority in Colombia (CARDIQUE).USFWS grantee Fundacion Proyecto Tití played a critical role in the designation of the Parque Natural Regional Bosque Seco El Ceibal-Mono Tití . The grantee has worked to promote Cotton Top Tamarin conservation while increasing sustainable economic activities for rural communities and reducing dependence on income from the illegal pet trade.

Photo credit: Chase Pickering

Learn more about the park in Spanish: http://bit.ly/1fjNemo

Learn more about the Service’s work in Latin America: http://1.usa.gov/1dkc43O

(via: USFWS_International Affairs)

photonasty
animalfunwithnature:

E is for Emperor Tamarin!
Known for it’s distinctive moustache which is known to resemble the moustache of Emperor Wilhelm II of Germany, that is how the Emperor tamarin got its name. They are very sociable primates and are known to live up to twenty years. The oldest female tamarin leads the group of about seven mature males and a family of tamarins spend their nights in holes of trees.
Photo by: (Andrew3600) 

animalfunwithnature:

E is for Emperor Tamarin!

Known for it’s distinctive moustache which is known to resemble the moustache of Emperor Wilhelm II of Germany, that is how the Emperor tamarin got its name. They are very sociable primates and are known to live up to twenty years. The oldest female tamarin leads the group of about seven mature males and a family of tamarins spend their nights in holes of trees.

Photo by: (Andrew3600

Survey in Vietnam records highest number of Tonkin snub-nosed monkeys to date

Rare reversal of decline in unique species is cause for celebration

by Ally Catterick

A survey conducted in Ha Giang Province in Vietnam between September and October this year has recorded the highest number of Critically Endangered Tonkin snub-nosed monkeys known to date.

The Management Board of the protected area, known as Khau Ca Species and Habitat Conservation Area, announced that between 108 – 113 of the distinctive looking primate were recorded at the site.

Previously the highest recorded number for the protected area was approximately 90 individuals, suggesting the population is recovering.The survey was led by Fauna & Flora International’s (FFI) Vietnam Primate Programme Biologist, Nguyen Van Truong, and assisted by locally based community conservation teams and the University of Colorado Boulder’s research assistant team…

(read more: Fauna & Flora International)

photos: Nguyen Van Truong/FFI

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earth-song:

Mother and Child by garion
An adult female Dusky Leaf Monkey (Trachypithecus obscurus), also known as the Spectacled Langur, with an offspring in tow. The baby’s fur color is strikingly different from that of its mother. I was fortunate to be able to observe and photograph this pair, part of a troupe of monkeys, from some distance away.Shot at the highland forests of Bukit Tinggi, central Peninsular Malaysia.

earth-song:

Mother and Child by garion

An adult female Dusky Leaf Monkey (Trachypithecus obscurus), also known as the Spectacled Langur, with an offspring in tow. The baby’s fur color is strikingly different from that of its mother. I was fortunate to be able to observe and photograph this pair, part of a troupe of monkeys, from some distance away.

Shot at the highland forests of Bukit Tinggi, central Peninsular Malaysia.

Music & Monkeys: Monkey-Human Ancestors Got Music 30 Million Years Ago
by Jennifer Viegas
Music skills evolved at least 30 million years ago in the common ancestor of humans and monkeys, according to a new study that could help explain why chimpanzees drum on tree roots and monkey calls sound like singing.
The study, published in the latest issue of Biology Letters, also suggests an answer to this chicken-and-egg question: Which came first, language or music? The answer appears to be music.
"Musical behaviors would constitute a first step towards phonological patterning, and therefore language," lead author Andrea Ravignani told Discovery News…
(read more: Discovery News)
photo: Markus Bockle

Music & Monkeys: Monkey-Human Ancestors Got Music 30 Million Years Ago

by Jennifer Viegas

Music skills evolved at least 30 million years ago in the common ancestor of humans and monkeys, according to a new study that could help explain why chimpanzees drum on tree roots and monkey calls sound like singing.

The study, published in the latest issue of Biology Letters, also suggests an answer to this chicken-and-egg question: Which came first, language or music? The answer appears to be music.

"Musical behaviors would constitute a first step towards phonological patterning, and therefore language," lead author Andrea Ravignani told Discovery News…

(read more: Discovery News)

photo: Markus Bockle

Photo Essay: Notes from India’s Kabini River Basin

text and photos by Amoghavarsha

The Nilgiris, also known as the “Blue mountains,” in southern India are an extraordinary mountain range that form one of the most diverse biospheres in the country, the Nilgiri Biosphere. And the Nagarhole National Park, declared a tiger reserve in 1999 is part of this biosphere.

The Kabini River flows through the National park and is the lifeline to a wide variety of flora and fauna. This river transforms Nagarhole into a water world of wonder…

(read more and see more photos: Monga Bay)

Some Monkeys Have Conversations That Resemble Ours
by Brandon Keim
The sounds of marmoset monkeys chattering may hint at the mysterious origins of human language.
A new study shows that marmosets exchange calls in a precisely timed, back-and-forth fashion typical of human conversation, but not found in other primates. The monkeys don’t appear to have a language, but the timing suggests the foundations of our own.
“That could be the foundation of more sophisticated things, like syntax,” said psychologist Asif Ghazanfar of Princeton University, co-author of the study, which was published today in Current Biology. “You can’t have any of those other really cool aspects of language without first having this.”…
(read more: Wired Science)
photo by bart Van Dorp | Flickr

Some Monkeys Have Conversations That Resemble Ours

by Brandon Keim

The sounds of marmoset monkeys chattering may hint at the mysterious origins of human language.

A new study shows that marmosets exchange calls in a precisely timed, back-and-forth fashion typical of human conversation, but not found in other primates. The monkeys don’t appear to have a language, but the timing suggests the foundations of our own.

“That could be the foundation of more sophisticated things, like syntax,” said psychologist Asif Ghazanfar of Princeton University, co-author of the study, which was published today in Current Biology. “You can’t have any of those other really cool aspects of language without first having this.”…

(read more: Wired Science)

photo by bart Van Dorp | Flickr