scientificillustration

wnycradiolab:

Primate faces.

Old World monkeys and apes that are more social have more complex facial patterns. Species that have smaller group sizes tend to have simpler faces with fewer colors.

(1) Tonkin Snub-nosed Monkey, Rhinopithecus avunculus
(2) Proboscis Monkey, Nasalis larvatus
(3) Javan Langur, Trachypithecus auratus
(4) Ugandan Red Colobus, Piliocolobus tephrosceles
(5) Mandrill, Mandrillus sphinx
(6) Stump-tailed Macaque, Macaca arctoides
(7) Moustached Guenon, Cercopithecus cephus
(8) Angolan Talapoin Monkey, Miopithecus talapoin
(9) Common Chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes
(10) Northern White-cheeked Gibbon, Nomascus leucogenys

Warmer colors indicate more highly complex faces — that is faces in which the pattern is composed by many colors.

Credit: Illustrations copyright 2012 Stephen D. Nash/IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group

(Read more)

Study probes why humans are more cooperative than other animals

Humans are generally highly cooperative and often impressively altruistic, quicker than any other animal species to help out strangers in need. A new study suggests that our lineage got that way by adopting so-called cooperative breeding: the caring for infants not just by the mother, but also by other members of the family and sometimes even unrelated adults. In addition to helping us get along with others, the advance led to the development of language and complex civilizations, the authors say…

Monkeys use Field Scientists as Human Shields Against Predators

by Jeremy Hance

If you’re monkey—say a samango monkey in South Africa—probably the last thing you want is to be torn apart and eaten by a leopard or a caracal. In fact, you probably spend a lot of time and energy working to avoid such a grisly fate. Well, now there’s a simpler way: just stick close to human researchers.

A new study in Behavioral Ecology finds that samango monkeys (Cercopithecus albogularis erythrarchus), also known as Stairs’s white-collared monkey, feel a lot safer from land predators when they know humans are close by.

Studying samango monkeys in the Soutpansberg Mountains of South Africa, researchers were curious about how these monkeys, which have long been habituated to scientists, may change behavior depending on the presence or absence of humans.

Headed by Katarzyna Nowak with Durham University, the scientists placed peanut feeding buckets for the monkeys at various heights in trees. Arboreal browsers, samango monkeys eat up-and-down trees, but like many such monkeys they show a preference for eating higher up in trees rather than near the ground. Scientists believe this is because it helps the species avoid ground-based predators…

(read more: Monga Bay)

photos by MongaBay and Katarzyna Nowak

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White-tailed Titi  (White-browed Titi, Red Titi Monkey, Titi Monkey, Socayo, Songo Songo, Cotoncillo rojo)
TheWhite-tailed Titi, Callicebus discolor (Primates - Pitheciidae), is one of the 29 recognized species of the South American titi monkeys. It is a small monkey, diurnal and arboreal. They live in groups ranging from 2 to 5 individuals, with an adult male and a female and her offspring. They are monogamous. The male helps in brood care and carries young on his back.
Callicebus discolor has one of the largest distribution ranges of all titi monkey species, occurring from central Peru to southern Colombia (Peru, Ecuador, Colombia).
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Stephen Davies
Locality: Garzacoha, Sucumbios, Ecuador

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White-tailed Titi  (White-browed Titi, Red Titi Monkey, Titi Monkey, Socayo, Songo Songo, Cotoncillo rojo)

TheWhite-tailed TitiCallicebus discolor (Primates - Pitheciidae), is one of the 29 recognized species of the South American titi monkeys. It is a small monkey, diurnal and arboreal. They live in groups ranging from 2 to 5 individuals, with an adult male and a female and her offspring. They are monogamous. The male helps in brood care and carries young on his back.

Callicebus discolor has one of the largest distribution ranges of all titi monkey species, occurring from central Peru to southern Colombia (Peru, Ecuador, Colombia).

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Stephen Davies

Locality: Garzacoha, Sucumbios, Ecuador

Kirk’s red colobus (Procolobus kirkii) is one of the 13 species of red colobus monkey assessed in Africa, of which 11 were listed as endangered or critically endangered.
Two may already be extinct: Bouvier’s red colobus (Procolobus pennantii bouvieri) has not been seen in 25 years, and no living Miss Waldron’s red colobus (Procolobus badius waldroni) has been seen by a primatologist since 1978, despite occasional reports that some still survive
Photograph: Tom Struhsaker/Conservation International
(via: Guardian UK)

Kirk’s red colobus (Procolobus kirkii) is one of the 13 species of red colobus monkey assessed in Africa, of which 11 were listed as endangered or critically endangered.

Two may already be extinct: Bouvier’s red colobus (Procolobus pennantii bouvieri) has not been seen in 25 years, and no living Miss Waldron’s red colobus (Procolobus badius waldroni) has been seen by a primatologist since 1978, despite occasional reports that some still survive

Photograph: Tom Struhsaker/Conservation International

(via: Guardian UK)

The grey-shanked douc langur (Pygathrix cinerea) is found in Vietnam. In Asia, more than 70% of primates are classified on the IUCN ‘red list’ as vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered; in both Vietnam and Cambodia, approximately 90% of primate species are considered at risk of extinction.
Photograph: Tilo Nadler/Conservation International
(via: Guardian UK)

The grey-shanked douc langur (Pygathrix cinerea) is found in Vietnam. In Asia, more than 70% of primates are classified on the IUCN ‘red list’ as vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered; in both Vietnam and Cambodia, approximately 90% of primate species are considered at risk of extinction.

Photograph: Tilo Nadler/Conservation International

(via: Guardian UK)

From Shakespearean sonnets to impassioned speeches to lovers’ whispers, human language is an amazingly rich form of expression, whose evolution has long puzzled scientists.

Now, some researchers propose that human language represents the blending of two different communication systems, those found in songbirds and monkeys. Content-based language may have its roots in monkey alarm calls, while grammar may come from the expressive parts of bird song…

The owl-faced monkey (Cercopithecus hamlyni) is found mainly in bamboo and tropical moist forests of the Virunga National Park in the Democratic Rep. of Congo. It is one of 218 mammal species found in Virunga, including 22 primates.  The monkey is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. Many of its haunts are being lost as forests are cleared for agriculture. It is also caught in the crossfire of a civil war. The population is estimated to have declined by 30 per cent in the past three decades. image: Rod Williams/Naturepl.com
(via: New Scientist)

The owl-faced monkey (Cercopithecus hamlyni) is found mainly in bamboo and tropical moist forests of the Virunga National Park in the Democratic Rep. of Congo. It is one of 218 mammal species found in Virunga, including 22 primates.

The monkey is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. Many of its haunts are being lost as forests are cleared for agriculture. It is also caught in the crossfire of a civil war. The population is estimated to have declined by 30 per cent in the past three decades.

image: Rod Williams/Naturepl.com

(via: New Scientist)

With the cooperation of hundreds of ranchers and researchers, Azuero Earth Project aims to replant a swath of tropical dry forest, connecting the dry tropical forest on the coast to cloud forest further inland. The trees along the 140-kilometer (80-mile) wildlife corridor will create a continuous habitat for the Critically Endangered Azuero spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi azuerensis) and improve the soil for people who farm and ranch along the way…

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Lion-tailed macaque..!! | ©Sachin Shidlingannavar
Lion-tailed macaques, Macaca silenus (Primates - Cercopithecidae) are found only in India, in the Western Ghats mountains.
They are classified as a Endangered species on the IUCN Red List and are also included in Appendix I of CITES.
According to the last evaluation made by the IUCN Red List (ver. 3.1) the total wild population of Macaca silenus is estimated to be less than 4,000 individuals, made up of 47 isolated subpopulations in seven different locations. The macaque in the photo is from a self-sustainable single population of 32 groups of lion-tailed macaques in Sirsi-Honnavara, India.

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Lion-tailed macaque..!! | ©Sachin Shidlingannavar

Lion-tailed macaques, Macaca silenus (Primates - Cercopithecidae) are found only in India, in the Western Ghats mountains.

They are classified as a Endangered species on the IUCN Red List and are also included in Appendix I of CITES.

According to the last evaluation made by the IUCN Red List (ver. 3.1) the total wild population of Macaca silenus is estimated to be less than 4,000 individuals, made up of 47 isolated subpopulations in seven different locations. The macaque in the photo is from a self-sustainable single population of 32 groups of lion-tailed macaques in Sirsi-Honnavara, India.

The Zanzibar red colobus (Procolobus kirkii) is a species of red colobus monkey endemic to Unguja, the main island of the Zanzibar Archipelago, in Tanzania. Brought to attention of Western science by Sir John Kirk, this colobus was first described by John Edward Gray in 1868. It is now considered an endangered species, and extensive conservation efforts have been undertaken since the mid-1990s.
Photograph: juvenile pictured, byHasin Shakur                                         via: WIkipedia

The Zanzibar red colobus (Procolobus kirkii) is a species of red colobus monkey endemic to Unguja, the main island of the Zanzibar Archipelago, in Tanzania. Brought to attention of Western science by Sir John Kirk, this colobus was first described by John Edward Gray in 1868. It is now considered an endangered species, and extensive conservation efforts have been undertaken since the mid-1990s.

Photograph: juvenile pictured, byHasin Shakur                                         via: WIkipedia

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Leontopithecus chrysomelas (in tree) | ©Hans Hillewaert
The Golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas), also known as the Golden-headed tamarin, is a lion tamarin endemic to Brazil. It is found only in the lowland and premontane tropical forest fragments in the state of Bahia, and therefore is considered to be an endangered species.
Mammalia - Primates - Callitrichidae - Leontopithecus - L. chrysomelas

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Leontopithecus chrysomelas (in tree) | ©Hans Hillewaert

The Golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas), also known as the Golden-headed tamarin, is a lion tamarin endemic to Brazil. It is found only in the lowland and premontane tropical forest fragments in the state of Bahia, and therefore is considered to be an endangered species.

Mammalia - Primates - Callitrichidae - LeontopithecusL. chrysomelas