libutron
libutron:

Orsis Bluewing - Monteiro Lobato, São Paulo, Brazil | ©Rubens Araujo
The Orsis blue wing butterfly, Myscelia orsis (Nymphalidae - Biblidinae) is a brightly coloured Neotropical butterfly named for the vibrant blue color of the male’s wings. Although mainly blue above, the male Orsis bluewing butterfly also has black margins to its upperwings, and a reddish-brown patch on the outer edge of the forewings. The forewings are also marked with lighter blue patches, and the tips of the forewings are quite square in shape.
This species occurs in the Atlantic forest of South America, where it appears to be abundant in forest fragments.
[Source] 

libutron:

Orsis Bluewing - Monteiro Lobato, São Paulo, Brazil | ©Rubens Araujo

The Orsis blue wing butterfly, Myscelia orsis (Nymphalidae - Biblidinae) is a brightly coloured Neotropical butterfly named for the vibrant blue color of the male’s wings. Although mainly blue above, the male Orsis bluewing butterfly also has black margins to its upperwings, and a reddish-brown patch on the outer edge of the forewings. The forewings are also marked with lighter blue patches, and the tips of the forewings are quite square in shape.

This species occurs in the Atlantic forest of South America, where it appears to be abundant in forest fragments.

[Source

287 amphibian and reptile species in Peruvian park sets world record

by Rhett A. Butler

It’s official: Manu National Park in Peru has the highest diversity of reptiles and amphibians in the world.

Surveys of the park, which extends from high Andean cloud forests down into the tropical rainforest of the Western Amazon, and its buffer zone turned up 155 amphibian and 132 reptile species, 16 more than the 271 species documented in Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park in 2010.

The research, published in the journal Biota Neotropica, was conducted by Alessandro Catenazzi of the Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Edgar Lehr of Illinois Wesleyan University, and Rudolf von May of the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at University of California, Berkeley.
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2014/0128-manu-world-record-herps.html#XRR1ekDVJvrEYg7i.99

(read more: MongaBay)

photos: Alessandro Catenazzi and Rudolf VonMay

libutron
libutron:

Pink Dolphin in Rio Negro, Amazon | ©Antonio Da Cruz
The Pink Dolphin, Boto or Amazon River dolphin, Inia geoffrensis (Mammalia - Cetacea - Iniidae), is the largest of the river dolphins, with males achieving a length of up to 2.55 m (average: 2.32 m) and a mass of up to 207 kg (average: 154 kg). Females are smaller, getting up to 2.18 m (average: 2.00 m) in length and 154 kg (average: 100 kg) in mass. This difference in size marks this species as one of the most sexually dimorphic cetaceans, and having larger males makes it unique among river dolphins, where females are generally the larger sex…
(read more)

libutron:

Pink Dolphin in Rio Negro, Amazon | ©Antonio Da Cruz

The Pink Dolphin, Boto or Amazon River dolphin, Inia geoffrensis (Mammalia - Cetacea - Iniidae), is the largest of the river dolphins, with males achieving a length of up to 2.55 m (average: 2.32 m) and a mass of up to 207 kg (average: 154 kg). Females are smaller, getting up to 2.18 m (average: 2.00 m) in length and 154 kg (average: 100 kg) in mass. This difference in size marks this species as one of the most sexually dimorphic cetaceans, and having larger males makes it unique among river dolphins, where females are generally the larger sex…

(read more)

Zoo Miami is home to a new litter of highly endangered Giant Otters!

The two male giant otter pups (Pteronura brasiliensis) were born on December 19 and are doing well so far. These little guys, now about two feet (60 cm) long and weighing approximately four pounds (.9 kg), will be truly giant as adults. They may grow to be nearly six feet (1.8 m) long and weigh close to 75 pounds (34 kg)!

Read more: ZooBorns

photographs by ZooMiami

First New Species of River Dolphin Discovered in a Century

Proposed new species in Brazil is thought to be highly endangered.

by Brian Clark Howard

A suspected new river dolphin species has emerged in Brazil, and scientists warn that it is highly endangered.

River dolphins (also known as botos) are among the rarest, and most endangered, dolphins in the world. Three of the four known species are listed as “threatened” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The discovery of a wholly new species—the first such find in a century—is thus exciting news for biologists and conservation officials.

Scientists led by Tomas Hrbek of the Universidade Federal do Amazonas in Manaus, Brazil, announced the existence of the proposed new species of river dolphin in PLOS ONE on January 22. Discovered in the Araguaia River Basin in central Brazil, the animals were isolated from other botos (Inia geoffrensis and Inia boliviensis) in the adjacent Amazon Basin to the west by a series of rapids and a small canal. As a result, the scientists suggest calling the new species the Araguaian boto, or Inia araguaiaensis

(read more: National Geographic)

images: Nicole Dutra and the National Institute for Amazonian Research (INPA)

astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

Swallow Tanager (Tersina viridis)

…a species of tanager (Thraupidae) that is the sole member of the genus Tersina. Swallow tanagers are native to South America and range from Panama to northern Argentina. They typically inhabit forest edges, open woodlands, clearings, and other areas near water. Like other tanagers T. viridis feeds mainly on insects and a variety of fruits, mainly berries and avocados. Swallow tanagers are sexually dimorphic with females sporting a green coloration and the males sporting a blue coloration.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Passeriformes-Thraupidae-Tersina-T. viridis

Images: Ben Tavener and Dario Sanches

libutron
libutron:

Leontopithecus chrysomelas (in tree) | ©Hans Hillewaert
The Golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas), also known as the Golden-headed tamarin, is a lion tamarin endemic to Brazil. It is found only in the lowland and premontane tropical forest fragments in the state of Bahia, and therefore is considered to be an endangered species.
Mammalia - Primates - Callitrichidae - Leontopithecus - L. chrysomelas

libutron:

Leontopithecus chrysomelas (in tree) | ©Hans Hillewaert

The Golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas), also known as the Golden-headed tamarin, is a lion tamarin endemic to Brazil. It is found only in the lowland and premontane tropical forest fragments in the state of Bahia, and therefore is considered to be an endangered species.

Mammalia - Primates - Callitrichidae - LeontopithecusL. chrysomelas

CURRENT WORK IN HERPETOLOGY:
One Lizard, 4 Species - The Collared Tree Runner
by Chris Samoray
Now, that’s a horse of a different color. Or, in this case, a lizard of another species—four species.  Recent research suggests that the collared treerunner (Plica plica), previously thought of as one widespread species, is actually four distinct species inhabiting diverse geographical areas east of the Andes in northern South America.  “The four new species described here all appear to be associated with areas of endemism or specific features of the northern South American landscape,” write John Murphy of Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History and Michael Jowers of the Estación Biológica de Doñana in Spain in their article published in ZooKeys…
(read more: MongaBay)
photograph by Rhett A. Butler

CURRENT WORK IN HERPETOLOGY:

One Lizard, 4 Species - The Collared Tree Runner

by Chris Samoray

Now, that’s a horse of a different color. Or, in this case, a lizard of another species—four species.

Recent research suggests that the collared treerunner (Plica plica), previously thought of as one widespread species, is actually four distinct species inhabiting diverse geographical areas east of the Andes in northern South America.

“The four new species described here all appear to be associated with areas of endemism or specific features of the northern South American landscape,” write John Murphy of Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History and Michael Jowers of the Estación Biológica de Doñana in Spain in their article published in ZooKeys

(read more: MongaBay)

photograph by Rhett A. Butler

libutron
libutron:

Macaco-da-noite (Aotus nigriceps) - Peru | ©Cláudio Dias Timm
The Black-headed night monkeys, Aotus nigriceps, are small primates approximately the same size as a small squirrel. They are native to neotropical South America (Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia and Peru).
Animalia - Chordata - Mammalia - Primates - Aotidae - Aotus - A. nigriceps
More information.

libutron:

Macaco-da-noite (Aotus nigriceps) - Peru | ©Cláudio Dias Timm

The Black-headed night monkeys, Aotus nigriceps, are small primates approximately the same size as a small squirrel. They are native to neotropical South America (Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia and Peru).

Animalia - Chordata - Mammalia - Primates - Aotidae - Aotus - A. nigriceps

More information.

Video: Female Monkeys Throw Stones To Attract Males
People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones. But the tactic works for female capuchin monkeys who want a male’s attention.
by Douglas Main
To signal their readiness to mate and get males’ attention, some female capuchin monkeys in a Brazilian forest reserve have taken to throwing stones at the objects of their desire. It’s the first time this type of behavior has been witnessed in the wild. To make a scientifically dubious cross-species reference, perhaps they have simply run out of other courtship ideas, like human men honking horns in this Seinfeld bit (at 1:45). More typically, females signal their readiness to mate by pulling pouting faces, whining loudly or touching males and running away. But some female bearded capuchin monkeys in Serra da Capivara National Park have taken this more assertive approach. As the BBC reports…
(read more and watch video: Popular Science)
image: Tiago Falótico and Eduardo B. Ottoni / PLOS ONE

Video: Female Monkeys Throw Stones To Attract Males

People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones. But the tactic works for female capuchin monkeys who want a male’s attention.

by Douglas Main

To signal their readiness to mate and get males’ attention, some female capuchin monkeys in a Brazilian forest reserve have taken to throwing stones at the objects of their desire. It’s the first time this type of behavior has been witnessed in the wild. To make a scientifically dubious cross-species reference, perhaps they have simply run out of other courtship ideas, like human men honking horns in this Seinfeld bit (at 1:45). More typically, females signal their readiness to mate by pulling pouting faces, whining loudly or touching males and running away. But some female bearded capuchin monkeys in Serra da Capivara National Park have taken this more assertive approach. As the BBC reports

(read more and watch video: Popular Science)

image: Tiago Falótico and Eduardo B. Ottoni / PLOS ONE

We stepped off the boat and asked our driver to pick us up from the island at midnight. Then we headed off into the muddy dark, seizing our final chance to solve a mystery that had captivated scientists and the internet since early September. That’s when photos of the enigmatic fenced-in silk towers that had been spotted on this island, deep in the Peruvian Amazon, first went viral…

High-living frogs hurt by remote oil roads in the Amazon
by Jeremy Hance
Often touted as low-impact, remote oil roads in the Amazon are, in fact, having a large impact on frogs living in flowers in the upper canopy, according to a new paper published in PLOS ONE. In Ecuador’s Yasuni National Park, massive bromeliads grow on tall tropical trees high in the canopy and may contain up to four liters of standing water. Lounging inside this micro-pools, researchers find a wide diversity of life, including various species of frogs. However, despite these frogs living as high as 50 meters above the forest floor, a new study finds that proximity to oil roads actually decreases the populations of high-living frogs.
"Our findings of significantly reduced frog abundance and occupancy along the Maxus oil road were somewhat unexpected to us, as this is a road of minimal width and there is primary forest right up to the edge of the right of way with small forest clearings limited to a very few sites within our study area," explains lead author Shawn McCracken with Texas State University-San Marcos…
(read more: MongaBay)
photograph: Bejat McCracken

High-living frogs hurt by remote oil roads in the Amazon

by Jeremy Hance

Often touted as low-impact, remote oil roads in the Amazon are, in fact, having a large impact on frogs living in flowers in the upper canopy, according to a new paper published in PLOS ONE. In Ecuador’s Yasuni National Park, massive bromeliads grow on tall tropical trees high in the canopy and may contain up to four liters of standing water. Lounging inside this micro-pools, researchers find a wide diversity of life, including various species of frogs. However, despite these frogs living as high as 50 meters above the forest floor, a new study finds that proximity to oil roads actually decreases the populations of high-living frogs.

"Our findings of significantly reduced frog abundance and occupancy along the Maxus oil road were somewhat unexpected to us, as this is a road of minimal width and there is primary forest right up to the edge of the right of way with small forest clearings limited to a very few sites within our study area," explains lead author Shawn McCracken with Texas State University-San Marcos…

(read more: MongaBay)

photograph: Bejat McCracken

Driving Diversity in the Tropics How is one hectare of tropical forest able to harbor more tree species than there are in Canada and the continental United States combined? Until now, researchers have struggled to explain why the tropics can achieve such biodiversity while temperate regions generally host far fewer plant species. But, the ongoing evolutionary “arms race” between plants and herbivores may help to explain this phenomenon, according to the authors of a Perspective article. 
Phyllis Coley and Thomas Kursar highlight recent research that suggests so many plant species are able to cram into small plots of land in the tropics because their defenses are so finely tuned by interactions with pests. Plants in temperate regions, on the other hand, are generally under less pressure from herbivores and disease, they say…
read the paper here
(via: Science Magazine/AAAS)

Driving Diversity in the Tropics

How is one hectare of tropical forest able to harbor more tree species than there are in Canada and the continental United States combined? Until now, researchers have struggled to explain why the tropics can achieve such biodiversity while temperate regions generally host far fewer plant species. But, the ongoing evolutionary “arms race” between plants and herbivores may help to explain this phenomenon, according to the authors of a Perspective article.

Phyllis Coley and Thomas Kursar highlight recent research that suggests so many plant species are able to cram into small plots of land in the tropics because their defenses are so finely tuned by interactions with pests. Plants in temperate regions, on the other hand, are generally under less pressure from herbivores and disease, they say…

read the paper here

(via: Science Magazine/AAAS)