Asian Multi-spotted Ladybird Beetle (Harmonia axyridis):

The first photo set shows the variety in coloration and spotting, bit what stays the same are the large white edge spots on the sides of the pronotum (thoracic shield).  (photo by ©entomart)

The second set shows the full life cycle of H. axyridis. (photo by puddingforbrains).

This species has been widely introduced, purposefully, into Europe and North America, as garden pest control. This has had a deleterious effect on several of our native lady bird beetle (“ladybugs”) species, as native species are often unable to compete with the voracious predator of scales and aphids.

In the United States, we do have several species of native Ladybird Beetle. Find out more here:

http://bugguide.net/node/view/179

Milkweed Leaf Beetle (Labidomera clivicollis)

For the past couple of weeks, I’ve noticed a new visitor to the Milkweeds, in the herb garden at the nature center (where I work, Houston, TX). Living along side various aphids, ladybird beetles, monarch butterfly caterpillars is this gorgeous little yellow phase Milkweed Leaf Beetle (they are more commonly red and black, or even orange and black). This beetle is associated with a few species of milkweed across North America, which they feed on, by first draining some of the poisonous sap at the base of the leaf with a well placed cut.

- Paxon

libutron
libutron:

Bee Beetle - Trichius gallicus 
This hairy beetle resembling a bee is an European species of the Scarabaeidae Family, scientifically named Trichius gallicus [Synonym: Trichius rosaceus], and commonly referred to as Bee Beetle due to its coloration pattern and because it buzzes like a bee when it flies.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©linanjohn | Locality: Ciron, Brenne, France (2010)

libutron:

Bee Beetle - Trichius gallicus 

This hairy beetle resembling a bee is an European species of the Scarabaeidae Family, scientifically named Trichius gallicus [Synonym: Trichius rosaceus], and commonly referred to as Bee Beetle due to its coloration pattern and because it buzzes like a bee when it flies.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©linanjohn | Locality: Ciron, Brenne, France (2010)

Beetle ID - BC, Canada:
Possible ID, please? :) Found in Vernon, British Columbia, Canada.
Paxon:
Yes absolutely. This is a Knapweed Root Weevil (Cyphocleonus achates), family Curculionidae. They are native to Europe, and were introduced into North America to help control invasive Knapweed.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/226667
http://www.invasive.org/browse/subthumb.cfm?sub=3127
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyphocleonus_achates

Beetle ID - BC, Canada:

Possible ID, please? :) Found in Vernon, British Columbia, Canada.

Paxon:

Yes absolutely. This is a Knapweed Root Weevil (Cyphocleonus achates), family Curculionidae. They are native to Europe, and were introduced into North America to help control invasive Knapweed.

http://bugguide.net/node/view/226667

http://www.invasive.org/browse/subthumb.cfm?sub=3127

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyphocleonus_achates

SCIENCE FRIDAY:  “Talking” Like a Firefly

by Ariel Zych

If you’re lucky enough to live where fireflies flash at night, then you have surely seen their magical illuminations on warm summer evenings. But did you know that by observing fireflies while they are flashing, you can learn to communicate with them? If you haven’t already, watch the Science Friday Video “In a Flash: Firefly Communication” for a little background on how fireflies use light to communicate.

By watching and comparing fireflies all across the country, scientists have been able to map out the unique flash patterns of male and female fireflies of different species. Dr. John E. Lloyd, an entomologist at the University of Florida, featured in the video above, was one of the first to do this extensively for North American species of firefly in the genus Photinus.
Using just a penlight and a cheat sheet of firefly signals of firefly signals based on Dr. Lloyd’s observations, you’ll be on your way towards speaking in a genuine firefly dialect (though your accent may need extra work)…
(read more: Science Friday)
Beetle ID - Alberta, Canada:
Hello, just wondering if you might possibly be able to ID this lil bug? Found him in a creek-y area in Central Alberta. Thanks :)
Paxon:
This is a White-spotted Pine Sawyer (Monochamus scuttelatus). The larvae bore into the wood of pines and other coniferous trees. They are native to Canada and the Northern states of the U.S. It is also referred to as the “Tar Sands Beetle” in Alberta, because of its affinity for tar sands.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/7432
http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/92341.html
http://www.maine.gov/dacf/mfs/forest_health/insects/whitespotted_sawyer.htm

Beetle ID - Alberta, Canada:

Hello, just wondering if you might possibly be able to ID this lil bug? Found him in a creek-y area in Central Alberta. Thanks :)

Paxon:

This is a White-spotted Pine Sawyer (Monochamus scuttelatus). The larvae bore into the wood of pines and other coniferous trees. They are native to Canada and the Northern states of the U.S. It is also referred to as the “Tar Sands Beetle” in Alberta, because of its affinity for tar sands.

http://bugguide.net/node/view/7432

http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/92341.html

http://www.maine.gov/dacf/mfs/forest_health/insects/whitespotted_sawyer.htm

astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Hoplia coerulea
…is a strikingly colored species of melolonthine scarabaeid beetle which occurs throughout Southwest Europe, including France, Spain, and Switzerland. Only male Hoplia coerulea posses the iridescent sky blue coloration, females are a typical brownish color. 
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Coleoptera-Scarabeidae-Melolonthinae-Hoplia-H. coerulea
Image: Fritz Geller-Grimm and Felix Grimm

astronomy-to-zoology:

Hoplia coerulea

…is a strikingly colored species of melolonthine scarabaeid beetle which occurs throughout Southwest Europe, including France, Spain, and Switzerland. Only male Hoplia coerulea posses the iridescent sky blue coloration, females are a typical brownish color. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Coleoptera-Scarabeidae-Melolonthinae-Hoplia-H. coerulea

Image: Fritz Geller-Grimm and Felix Grimm

Beetle ID - Iowa, USA:
Okay, Sir. What in the world is this?! I came home after 1AM and saw this monster by my garage door. It is slick black, about an inch(?) in size or so. I reside in Western Iowa. I poked its butt with a stick to see what it would do and it slowly walked dragging its butt on the ground (or so it sounded). I’ve never seen this before! Sorry the picture isn’t too clear, it was hard to get an image of an all-black critter that was shiny. 
Paxon:
Icant be 100 positive without the animal in hand, but my best guess here is that its a Giant Black Water Beetle aka Giant Diving Scavenger Beetle (Hydrophilus triangularis).
http://bugguide.net/node/view/37654
http://wiki.bugwood.org/HPIPM:Giant_Water_Scavenger_Beetle

Beetle ID - Iowa, USA:

Okay, Sir. What in the world is this?! I came home after 1AM and saw this monster by my garage door. It is slick black, about an inch(?) in size or so. I reside in Western Iowa. I poked its butt with a stick to see what it would do and it slowly walked dragging its butt on the ground (or so it sounded). I’ve never seen this before! Sorry the picture isn’t too clear, it was hard to get an image of an all-black critter that was shiny. 

Paxon:

Icant be 100 positive without the animal in hand, but my best guess here is that its a Giant Black Water Beetle aka Giant Diving Scavenger Beetle (Hydrophilus triangularis).

http://bugguide.net/node/view/37654

http://wiki.bugwood.org/HPIPM:Giant_Water_Scavenger_Beetle