dendroica
astronomy-to-zoology:

"Filbert Weevil" (Curculio occidentis)
…a species of ‘acorn weevil’ (Curculio spp.) which is recorded occurring in California and surrounding areas. Filbert weevil larvae are noted for feeding on a variety of oak tree species. This has caused them to be regarded as a major pest due to the damage they cause to acorns. 
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Coleoptera-Curculionidae-Curculio-C. occidentis
Image: Ryan Kaldari

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Filbert Weevil" (Curculio occidentis)

…a species of ‘acorn weevil’ (Curculio spp.) which is recorded occurring in California and surrounding areas. Filbert weevil larvae are noted for feeding on a variety of oak tree species. This has caused them to be regarded as a major pest due to the damage they cause to acorns. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Coleoptera-Curculionidae-Curculio-C. occidentis

Image: Ryan Kaldari

libutron

libutron:

Common European Cockchafer - Melolontha melolontha

Also referred to as Maybug and Field Cockchafer, Melolontha melolontha (Coleoptera - Scarabaeidae) is a common inhabitant on agricultural lands throughout temperate Europe and the United States.

Males Common European Cockchafers have longer antennae than females, with a large, fan-like club protruding.

Cockchafers are among the most dreaded insect pests in many European countries, causing economic losses in agriculture, horticulture and forestry. In forests of south-western Germany, populations of the Forest Cockchafer (Melolontha hippocastani) and also the Field Cockchafer (M. melolontha) have been increasing during the past three decades and, therefore, monitoring of these populations has been intensified.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: [Top: ©Armando Caldas | Locality: Cabreira, Vendas Novas, Portugal, 2010] - [Bottom: ©rockwolf | Locality: Venus Pool, Shropshire, West Midlands, England, 2012]

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sinobug:

Tiger Beetle (Cosmodela aurulenta)

family Cicindelinae

The tiger beetles are a large group of beetles known for their aggressive predatory habits and running speed. The fastest species of tiger beetle can run at a speed of 9 km/h (5.6 mph), which, relative to its body length, is about 22 times the speed of former Olympic sprinter Michael Johnson,the equivalent of a human running at 480 miles per hour (770 km/h).
They live along sea and lake shores, on sand dunes, around lakebeds and on clay banks or woodland paths, being particularly fond of sandy surfaces. Tiger beetles are considered a good indicator species and have been used in ecological studies on biodiversity.

Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE

Asian Multi-spotted Ladybird Beetle (Harmonia axyridis):

The first photo set shows the variety in coloration and spotting, bit what stays the same are the large white edge spots on the sides of the pronotum (thoracic shield).  (photo by ©entomart)

The second set shows the full life cycle of H. axyridis. (photo by puddingforbrains).

This species has been widely introduced, purposefully, into Europe and North America, as garden pest control. This has had a deleterious effect on several of our native lady bird beetle (“ladybugs”) species, as native species are often unable to compete with the voracious predator of scales and aphids.

In the United States, we do have several species of native Ladybird Beetle. Find out more here:

http://bugguide.net/node/view/179

Milkweed Leaf Beetle (Labidomera clivicollis)

For the past couple of weeks, I’ve noticed a new visitor to the Milkweeds, in the herb garden at the nature center (where I work, Houston, TX). Living along side various aphids, ladybird beetles, monarch butterfly caterpillars is this gorgeous little yellow phase Milkweed Leaf Beetle (they are more commonly red and black, or even orange and black). This beetle is associated with a few species of milkweed across North America, which they feed on, by first draining some of the poisonous sap at the base of the leaf with a well placed cut.

- Paxon

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libutron:

Bee Beetle - Trichius gallicus 
This hairy beetle resembling a bee is an European species of the Scarabaeidae Family, scientifically named Trichius gallicus [Synonym: Trichius rosaceus], and commonly referred to as Bee Beetle due to its coloration pattern and because it buzzes like a bee when it flies.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©linanjohn | Locality: Ciron, Brenne, France (2010)

libutron:

Bee Beetle - Trichius gallicus 

This hairy beetle resembling a bee is an European species of the Scarabaeidae Family, scientifically named Trichius gallicus [Synonym: Trichius rosaceus], and commonly referred to as Bee Beetle due to its coloration pattern and because it buzzes like a bee when it flies.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©linanjohn | Locality: Ciron, Brenne, France (2010)

Beetle ID - BC, Canada:
Possible ID, please? :) Found in Vernon, British Columbia, Canada.
Paxon:
Yes absolutely. This is a Knapweed Root Weevil (Cyphocleonus achates), family Curculionidae. They are native to Europe, and were introduced into North America to help control invasive Knapweed.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/226667
http://www.invasive.org/browse/subthumb.cfm?sub=3127
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyphocleonus_achates

Beetle ID - BC, Canada:

Possible ID, please? :) Found in Vernon, British Columbia, Canada.

Paxon:

Yes absolutely. This is a Knapweed Root Weevil (Cyphocleonus achates), family Curculionidae. They are native to Europe, and were introduced into North America to help control invasive Knapweed.

http://bugguide.net/node/view/226667

http://www.invasive.org/browse/subthumb.cfm?sub=3127

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyphocleonus_achates

SCIENCE FRIDAY:  “Talking” Like a Firefly

by Ariel Zych

If you’re lucky enough to live where fireflies flash at night, then you have surely seen their magical illuminations on warm summer evenings. But did you know that by observing fireflies while they are flashing, you can learn to communicate with them? If you haven’t already, watch the Science Friday Video “In a Flash: Firefly Communication” for a little background on how fireflies use light to communicate.

By watching and comparing fireflies all across the country, scientists have been able to map out the unique flash patterns of male and female fireflies of different species. Dr. John E. Lloyd, an entomologist at the University of Florida, featured in the video above, was one of the first to do this extensively for North American species of firefly in the genus Photinus.
Using just a penlight and a cheat sheet of firefly signals of firefly signals based on Dr. Lloyd’s observations, you’ll be on your way towards speaking in a genuine firefly dialect (though your accent may need extra work)…
(read more: Science Friday)