astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Loccophilus pictus
…a species of predaceous diving beetle (Dytiscidae) which occurs in the southwest United States and Mexico. True to its family name L. pictus is an aquatic predator, patrolling heavily vegetated areas for a variety of small aquatic insects to feed on. 
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Coleoptera-Adephaga-Dytiscidae-Laccophilinae-Laccophilus-L. pictus
Image: ©Alex Wild 

astronomy-to-zoology:

Loccophilus pictus

…a species of predaceous diving beetle (Dytiscidae) which occurs in the southwest United States and Mexico. True to its family name L. pictus is an aquatic predator, patrolling heavily vegetated areas for a variety of small aquatic insects to feed on. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Coleoptera-Adephaga-Dytiscidae-Laccophilinae-Laccophilus-L. pictus

Image: ©Alex Wild 

Insect ID:

Hey sorry if this isn’t the right place to ask, but I’ve been getting these weird little webs in my apartment for a few weeks now. They’re no larger than about 1 square centimeter and I’ve so far only found them in between the junctures of my walls and wall/ceiling. I clean them up whenever I see them and just in the past week or so I’ve been finding these little guys (very similar to the pic in the next ask) on my walls behind pictures and paintings and such.

Paxon:

This is the larva of a varied carpet beetle (Anthrenus verbasci). They are common in homes across North America, and I believe they are harmless yo humans. Here’s more info:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varied_carpet_beetle

http://bugguide.net/node/view/95010

pungent-petrichor
pungent-petrichor:

Anyone know what this is? Found on a leaf in a shady area in Canterbury, UK, near a small river (the great stour).

Of course I know what this is! ;)
This is a pupa (or possibly just the pupal case) of a Harlequin Ladybird Beetle (Harmonia axyridis) aka Multicolored Asian Ladybird Beetle. Obviously, they were introduced into the UK from China, I believe for purposes of garden pest control.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmonia_axyridis
http://www.harlequin-survey.org/

pungent-petrichor:

Anyone know what this is?
Found on a leaf in a shady area in Canterbury, UK, near a small river (the great stour).

Of course I know what this is! ;)

This is a pupa (or possibly just the pupal case) of a Harlequin Ladybird Beetle (Harmonia axyridis) aka Multicolored Asian Ladybird Beetle. Obviously, they were introduced into the UK from China, I believe for purposes of garden pest control.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmonia_axyridis

http://www.harlequin-survey.org/

metazoa-etcetera
libutron:

Tiger beetle - Gymnetis cf. fulgurata
Sometimes considered as subspecies of Gymnetis strigosa, G. fulgurata (Coleoptera - Scarabaeidae - Cetoniinae) is a beautiful patterned beetle, native to the neotropical region (Mexico, Central and South America).
Despite its beauty, both larvae and adults of these beetles may cause undesirable damage to agricultural crops, but are also efficient decomposers of organic matter of the forest, no specific pollinators and good ecological and zoogeographical indicators.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Juan Carlos Gutiérrez Mejía | Locality: not reported (2008)

libutron:

Tiger beetle - Gymnetis cf. fulgurata

Sometimes considered as subspecies of Gymnetis strigosa, G. fulgurata (Coleoptera - Scarabaeidae - Cetoniinae) is a beautiful patterned beetle, native to the neotropical region (Mexico, Central and South America).

Despite its beauty, both larvae and adults of these beetles may cause undesirable damage to agricultural crops, but are also efficient decomposers of organic matter of the forest, no specific pollinators and good ecological and zoogeographical indicators.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Juan Carlos Gutiérrez Mejía | Locality: not reported (2008)

libutron
libutron:

Globemallow Leaf Beetle - Calligrapha serpentina 
The Globemallow Leaf Beetle may look like a type of Lady Bug, bit it is not. As a member of the leaf beetles family (Chrysomelidae) the diet of Calligrapha serpentina is plant-based, unlike the carnivorous diet of Lady Bugs. In fact, many leaf beetles are considered pests due to the extensive damage they inflict on the plants they are eating. 
As its common name suggests, the preferred vegetation of Calligrapha serpentina are plants in the mallow family, specifically the bushy, bright, desert-growing Globemallow.
This species occurs in the southwestern of the United States and Mexico.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Dave Beaudette | Locality: Fort Huachuca, Cochise County, Arizona, US (2014)

libutron:

Globemallow Leaf Beetle - Calligrapha serpentina 

The Globemallow Leaf Beetle may look like a type of Lady Bug, bit it is not. As a member of the leaf beetles family (Chrysomelidae) the diet of Calligrapha serpentina is plant-based, unlike the carnivorous diet of Lady Bugs. In fact, many leaf beetles are considered pests due to the extensive damage they inflict on the plants they are eating. 

As its common name suggests, the preferred vegetation of Calligrapha serpentina are plants in the mallow family, specifically the bushy, bright, desert-growing Globemallow.

This species occurs in the southwestern of the United States and Mexico.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Dave Beaudette | Locality: Fort Huachuca, Cochise County, Arizona, US (2014)

dendroica
astronomy-to-zoology:

Eudiagogus pulcher
…a species of Sesbania Clown Weevil (Eudiagogus spp.), a group of Broad-nosed Weevil (Entiminae). E. pulcher occurs from southern North America and Mexico south to Central America. Adult E. pulcher are typically seen in wetland margins and are known to feed on the foliage of rattlebox (Sesbania spp.). Their larvae will feed on rattlebox as well but instead of foliage will feed on the root nodules of rattlebox.
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Coleoptera-Polyphaga-Curculionoidea-Curculionidae-Entiminae-Eudiagogini-Eudiagogus-E. pulcher
Image: ©Tracy Palmer Villalobos

astronomy-to-zoology:

Eudiagogus pulcher

…a species of Sesbania Clown Weevil (Eudiagogus spp.), a group of Broad-nosed Weevil (Entiminae). E. pulcher occurs from southern North America and Mexico south to Central America. Adult E. pulcher are typically seen in wetland margins and are known to feed on the foliage of rattlebox (Sesbania spp.). Their larvae will feed on rattlebox as well but instead of foliage will feed on the root nodules of rattlebox.

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Coleoptera-Polyphaga-Curculionoidea-Curculionidae-Entiminae-Eudiagogini-Eudiagogus-E. pulcher

Image: ©Tracy Palmer Villalobos

Lately, here in Houston, TX, I’ve noticed that the Green June Beetles (Cotinis nitida) are flying all of the place again. This seems to happen every year in late Summer/early Fall. I found this fine little lady crawling around on an American Beautyberry.

This species is a kind of “flower chafer”, so named because the adults commonly feed on the nectar and pollen of flowers. In this area, the species is often associated with Magnolias. They are found through out the SE United States and into Northern Mexico.

libutron
libutron:

Banded Cucumber Beetle - Diabrotica balteata 
This beautiful beetle belonging to the species Diabrotica balteata (Coleoptera - Chrysomelidae) is a well known pest of many crops in Mexico, the United States and Central America. Adults are distinctive for their bright green color and by having two transverse bands on elytra, each with four irregular yellow spots.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: (via  | ©Luis Stevens) | Locality: San Luis Potosi, Mexico (2014)

libutron:

Banded Cucumber Beetle - Diabrotica balteata

This beautiful beetle belonging to the species Diabrotica balteata (Coleoptera - Chrysomelidae) is a well known pest of many crops in Mexico, the United States and Central America. Adults are distinctive for their bright green color and by having two transverse bands on elytra, each with four irregular yellow spots.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: (via | ©Luis Stevens) | Locality: San Luis Potosi, Mexico (2014)

dendroica
astronomy-to-zoology:

"Filbert Weevil" (Curculio occidentis)
…a species of ‘acorn weevil’ (Curculio spp.) which is recorded occurring in California and surrounding areas. Filbert weevil larvae are noted for feeding on a variety of oak tree species. This has caused them to be regarded as a major pest due to the damage they cause to acorns. 
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Coleoptera-Curculionidae-Curculio-C. occidentis
Image: Ryan Kaldari

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Filbert Weevil" (Curculio occidentis)

…a species of ‘acorn weevil’ (Curculio spp.) which is recorded occurring in California and surrounding areas. Filbert weevil larvae are noted for feeding on a variety of oak tree species. This has caused them to be regarded as a major pest due to the damage they cause to acorns. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Coleoptera-Curculionidae-Curculio-C. occidentis

Image: Ryan Kaldari

libutron

libutron:

Common European Cockchafer - Melolontha melolontha

Also referred to as Maybug and Field Cockchafer, Melolontha melolontha (Coleoptera - Scarabaeidae) is a common inhabitant on agricultural lands throughout temperate Europe and the United States.

Males Common European Cockchafers have longer antennae than females, with a large, fan-like club protruding.

Cockchafers are among the most dreaded insect pests in many European countries, causing economic losses in agriculture, horticulture and forestry. In forests of south-western Germany, populations of the Forest Cockchafer (Melolontha hippocastani) and also the Field Cockchafer (M. melolontha) have been increasing during the past three decades and, therefore, monitoring of these populations has been intensified.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: [Top: ©Armando Caldas | Locality: Cabreira, Vendas Novas, Portugal, 2010] - [Bottom: ©rockwolf | Locality: Venus Pool, Shropshire, West Midlands, England, 2012]

libutron

sinobug:

Tiger Beetle (Cosmodela aurulenta)

family Cicindelinae

The tiger beetles are a large group of beetles known for their aggressive predatory habits and running speed. The fastest species of tiger beetle can run at a speed of 9 km/h (5.6 mph), which, relative to its body length, is about 22 times the speed of former Olympic sprinter Michael Johnson,the equivalent of a human running at 480 miles per hour (770 km/h).
They live along sea and lake shores, on sand dunes, around lakebeds and on clay banks or woodland paths, being particularly fond of sandy surfaces. Tiger beetles are considered a good indicator species and have been used in ecological studies on biodiversity.

Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE

Asian Multi-spotted Ladybird Beetle (Harmonia axyridis):

The first photo set shows the variety in coloration and spotting, bit what stays the same are the large white edge spots on the sides of the pronotum (thoracic shield).  (photo by ©entomart)

The second set shows the full life cycle of H. axyridis. (photo by puddingforbrains).

This species has been widely introduced, purposefully, into Europe and North America, as garden pest control. This has had a deleterious effect on several of our native lady bird beetle (“ladybugs”) species, as native species are often unable to compete with the voracious predator of scales and aphids.

In the United States, we do have several species of native Ladybird Beetle. Find out more here:

http://bugguide.net/node/view/179