dendroica
dendroica:

The Buff-tailed Sicklebill (Eutoxeres condamini), a hermit hummingbird with a magnificently recurved bill, prepares to gather some nectar. The beautiful creatures is native to the Amazonian lowlands and lower elevations of the Andes from Colombia and Ecuador to Peru and Bolivia.
Picture: CHRISTOPHER WITT/REUTERS
(via Pictures of the day: 4 April 2014 - Telegraph)

dendroica:

The Buff-tailed Sicklebill (Eutoxeres condamini), a hermit hummingbird with a magnificently recurved bill, prepares to gather some nectar. The beautiful creatures is native to the Amazonian lowlands and lower elevations of the Andes from Colombia and Ecuador to Peru and Bolivia.

Picture: CHRISTOPHER WITT/REUTERS

(via Pictures of the day: 4 April 2014 - Telegraph)

Interactive Bird Song Poster
Learn the songs of these common breeding birds of the North American north woods region. Click through the image or click the link to click on each bird and learn its song…
(see and play here: MN Dept. of Natural Resources)
Illustration courtesy of Bill Reynolds. All recordings courtesy of The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, All About Birds.

Interactive Bird Song Poster

Learn the songs of these common breeding birds of the North American north woods region. Click through the image or click the link to click on each bird and learn its song…

(see and play here: MN Dept. of Natural Resources)

Illustration courtesy of Bill Reynolds. All recordings courtesy of The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, All About Birds.

astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

Pygmy Falcon (Polihierax semitorquatus)

Also known as the African Pygmy Falcon, P. semitorquatus is a small species of falcon, that occurs in eastern and southern Africa. The population in eastern Africa (P. s. castanotus) occurs from Sudan to Somalia south to Uganda and Tanzania. The population in southern Africa (P. s. semitorquatus) occurs from Angola to South Africa.

True to its common name P. semitorquatus is very small at only 19-20 cm long, making it the smallest raptor in Africa. Pygmy falcons typically inhabit dry bush habitats and will feed on insects, small mammals, birds, and reptiles. Pygmy falcons will usually in the nests of weavers, and even though they feed on bird will rarely go after their weaver neighbors.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Falconiformes-Falconidae-Polihierax-P. semitorquatus

Images: Steve Garvie and Bob

astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Pink-headed Warbler (Cardellina versicolor)
…a small species of New-World Warbler (Parulidae) that is endemic to the highlands of central and eastern Chiapas in Mexico, to western Guatemala. In this range they commonly occupy humid/semi-humid evergreen and oak forests along with pine forests as well. Like other New World warblers pink-headed warblers are insectivores, foraging for insects and other small invertebrates from vegetation.
Currently Cardellina versicolor numbers are declining, due to habitat fragmentation and lost. This has caused it to be listed as Vulnerable.
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Passeriformes-Parulidae-Cardellina-C. versicolor
Image: Dominic Sherony

astronomy-to-zoology:

Pink-headed Warbler (Cardellina versicolor)

…a small species of New-World Warbler (Parulidae) that is endemic to the highlands of central and eastern Chiapas in Mexico, to western Guatemala. In this range they commonly occupy humid/semi-humid evergreen and oak forests along with pine forests as well. Like other New World warblers pink-headed warblers are insectivores, foraging for insects and other small invertebrates from vegetation.

Currently Cardellina versicolor numbers are declining, due to habitat fragmentation and lost. This has caused it to be listed as Vulnerable.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Passeriformes-Parulidae-Cardellina-C. versicolor

Image: Dominic Sherony

Warblers are among the most challenging birds to identify, with their seasonally changing plumages and often-confused songs and calls. Download eight illustrated plates for free, provided by the authors of The Warbler Guide. Use these “Quick Finders” to help you identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada…

State of Idaho plans to poison up to 4,000 Common Ravens. 
Justification: Ravens prey on the eggs of the imperiled Greater Sage-Grouse. Yet of 19 reasons for the grouse’s declining numbers, predation by other wildlife comes in at #12. Providing protected areas and requiring sustainable land management are the most important ways to conserve the grouse, not killing avian predators. 
Join petition by Golden Eagle Audubon Society: Sign the petition here.
(via: American Bird Conservancy)

State of Idaho plans to poison up to 4,000 Common Ravens.

Justification: Ravens prey on the eggs of the imperiled Greater Sage-Grouse. Yet of 19 reasons for the grouse’s declining numbers, predation by other wildlife comes in at #12. Providing protected areas and requiring sustainable land management are the most important ways to conserve the grouse, not killing avian predators.

Join petition by Golden Eagle Audubon Society:

Sign the petition here.

(via: American Bird Conservancy)

astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

Greater Painted-snipe (Rostratula benghalensis)

…a species of Painted-snipe (Rostraulidae) that occurs in parts of Africa, India, Pakistan and Southeast Asia. Like most waders greater painted-snipe are typically found close to marshes, ponds, swamps, reed beds, streams, and other wet areas. They feed mainly on aquatic insects, crustaceans, molluscs and occasionally seeds which are obtained by probing through mud. Greater painted-snipe are fairly shy and secretive, typically seen close to/in vegetation either solitary or in small groups.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Charadriiformes-Rostratulidae-Rostratula-R. benghalensis

Images: Charles Lam and J.M. Garg

Houston Audubon Beak of the Week:
Hooded Warbler (Setophaga citrina) Family: (Parulidae) Wood-Warblers  A striking small bird of eastern hardwood forests, the Hooded Warbler prefers forests with some shrub understory. The female has no hood or only a hint of a hood. Both sexes often flash their tails, revealing conspicuous white side feathers. They forage in undergrowth, usually no more than 10 feet above the ground. 

Hooded Warblers can currently be seen at Houston Audubon’s High Island and other wooded sanctuaries. The Hooded Warbler is strongly territorial on its wintering grounds. Males and females use different habitats: males in mature forest, and females in scrubbier forest and seasonally flooded areas. If a male is removed, a female in adjacent scrub will not move into the male’s territory. Photograph by Joanne Kamo

(via: Houston Audubon)
Houston Audubon Beak of the Week:
Hooded Warbler (Setophaga citrina)

Family: (Parulidae) Wood-Warblers

A striking small bird of eastern hardwood forests, the Hooded Warbler prefers forests with some shrub understory. The female has no hood or only a hint of a hood. Both sexes often flash their tails, revealing conspicuous white side feathers. They forage in undergrowth, usually no more than 10 feet above the ground.
Hooded Warblers can currently be seen at Houston Audubon’s High Island and other wooded sanctuaries.

The Hooded Warbler is strongly territorial on its wintering grounds. Males and females use different habitats: males in mature forest, and females in scrubbier forest and seasonally flooded areas. If a male is removed, a female in adjacent scrub will not move into the male’s territory.

Photograph by Joanne Kamo
ABC Bird of the Week:  Streamer-tailed Tyrant
This large flycatcher is a resident of wet South American grasslands and is named for its long, deeply forked tail, which plays a role in courtship. A pair will perch facing each other, bobbing up and down and fanning their tails while calling continuously.
The Streamer-tailed Tyrant can be found at the Barba Azul Reserve in Bolivia, created by ABC and Asociación Armonia in 2008 to protect unique Beni savanna habitat and the critically endangered Blue-throated Macaw. Other unique and threatened species that can be found at Barba Azul include the Cock-tailed Tyrant, Orinoco Goose, and Buff-breasted Sandpiper, which stops here during migration.
The Bolivian population of the species found in Barba Azul is isolated by over 400 miles of Beni savannas from populations in Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina. Further study may reveal that it has evolved into a distinct species…
(read more: American Bird Conservancy)
photo: Gary Kinard

ABC Bird of the Week:  Streamer-tailed Tyrant

This large flycatcher is a resident of wet South American grasslands and is named for its long, deeply forked tail, which plays a role in courtship. A pair will perch facing each other, bobbing up and down and fanning their tails while calling continuously.

The Streamer-tailed Tyrant can be found at the Barba Azul Reserve in Bolivia, created by ABC and Asociación Armonia in 2008 to protect unique Beni savanna habitat and the critically endangered Blue-throated Macaw. Other unique and threatened species that can be found at Barba Azul include the Cock-tailed Tyrant, Orinoco Goose, and Buff-breasted Sandpiper, which stops here during migration.

The Bolivian population of the species found in Barba Azul is isolated by over 400 miles of Beni savannas from populations in Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina. Further study may reveal that it has evolved into a distinct species…

(read more: American Bird Conservancy)

photo: Gary Kinard

Saving the Sage Grouse
There once were millions of sage-grouse across the West; now there are a couple hundred thousand. The National Wildlife Refuge System http://www.fws.gov/refuges/ is working with private landowners and conservation partners to save the species http://1.usa.gov/1ileP7B.
Photo: A female sage-grouse in flight. Credit: Gary Weddle / Sage Grouse Initiative
(via: USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System)

Saving the Sage Grouse

There once were millions of sage-grouse across the West; now there are a couple hundred thousand. The National Wildlife Refuge System http://www.fws.gov/refuges/ is working with private landowners and conservation partners to save the species http://1.usa.gov/1ileP7B.

Photo: A female sage-grouse in flight. Credit: Gary Weddle / Sage Grouse Initiative

(via: USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System)