Smarter than a first-grader? 
Crows can perform as well as 7- to 10-year-olds on cause-and-effect water displacement tasks.
via: UC - Santa Barbara
In Aesop’s fable about the crow and the pitcher, a thirsty bird happens upon a vessel of water, but when he tries to drink from it, he finds the water level out of his reach. Not strong enough to knock over the pitcher, the bird drops pebbles into it — one at a time — until the water level rises enough for him to drink his fill. New research demonstrates the birds’ intellectual prowess may be more fact than fiction…
(read more: Science Daily)
photo: New Caledonian crow. Credit: Jolyon Troscianko

Smarter than a first-grader?

Crows can perform as well as 7- to 10-year-olds on cause-and-effect water displacement tasks.

via: UC - Santa Barbara

In Aesop’s fable about the crow and the pitcher, a thirsty bird happens upon a vessel of water, but when he tries to drink from it, he finds the water level out of his reach. Not strong enough to knock over the pitcher, the bird drops pebbles into it — one at a time — until the water level rises enough for him to drink his fill. New research demonstrates the birds’ intellectual prowess may be more fact than fiction…

(read more: Science Daily)

photo: New Caledonian crow. Credit: Jolyon Troscianko

A male Myrtle Warbler (Setophaga coronata coronata) in breeding plumage, photographed in the Léon-Provancher Ecological Reserve, Québec, Canada. This form, found in the northeastern United States and eastern Canada, is considered conspecific with the Audubon’s warbler, which is found further west. The myrtle warbler can be distinguished from the Audubon’s by its whitish eyestripe, white (not yellow) throat, and contrasting cheek patch.
 Photograph: Simon Pierre Barrette
(via: Wikipedia)

A male Myrtle Warbler (Setophaga coronata coronata) in breeding plumage, photographed in the Léon-Provancher Ecological Reserve, Québec, Canada. This form, found in the northeastern United States and eastern Canada, is considered conspecific with the Audubon’s warbler, which is found further west. The myrtle warbler can be distinguished from the Audubon’s by its whitish eyestripe, white (not yellow) throat, and contrasting cheek patch.

Photograph: Simon Pierre Barrette

(via: Wikipedia)

Sandhill Cranes in Florida
The sandhill crane is an elegant and mighty bird. It has a crippling cry that can be heard up to 2.5 miles away. They call to each other while on the ground as well as in flight. Many times you hear them before you see them. 
These majestic heron-like, gray-bodied birds with the crimson patch of skin on top of their head breed in open wetlands, fields, and prairies across North America. 
In Florida, the year-round resident population numbers around 4,000 to 5,000. It breeds here and doesn’t migrate. Every November and December, 25,000 migratory greater sandhill cranes ̶ the larger of the two subspecies ̶ join the resident population, staying here until March and April. 
Orlando Wetlands Park is just one of many GFBWT sites where you can enjoy this elegant bird over the summer. Photo by MyFWC - GBFT
(via: My Florida Wildlife Commission)

Sandhill Cranes in Florida

The sandhill crane is an elegant and mighty bird. It has a crippling cry that can be heard up to 2.5 miles away. They call to each other while on the ground as well as in flight. Many times you hear them before you see them.

These majestic heron-like, gray-bodied birds with the crimson patch of skin on top of their head breed in open wetlands, fields, and prairies across North America.

In Florida, the year-round resident population numbers around 4,000 to 5,000. It breeds here and doesn’t migrate. Every November and December, 25,000 migratory greater sandhill cranes ̶ the larger of the two subspecies ̶ join the resident population, staying here until March and April.

Orlando Wetlands Park is just one of many GFBWT sites where you can enjoy this elegant bird over the summer.

Photo by MyFWC - GBFT

(via: My Florida Wildlife Commission)

White Ibis and Roseate Spoonbills 
at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, FL, USA
The roseate spoonbill is a member of the ibis family but you wouldn’t think so because of its luminous pale pink plumage with red highlights or the long bill with the spoon-shaped tip. The spatulate bill of this species has an important function. It has sensitive nerve endings that help the spoonbill detect prey. As it sweeps the bill from side to side through shallow water, the spoonbill encounters small fish, shrimp, crayfish, fiddler crabs and aquatic insects, which it snaps up and swallows. 
The diet of the white ibis primarily consists of crabs, crayfish, fish, snakes, frogs and insects. This species is found throughout most of Florida. The main threat to both birds is loss of coastal habitat and freshwater feeding areas to development. 
In Florida, ook for flocks of ibis and spoonbills at Fort De Soto County Park in Pinellas County or Dinner Island Ranch Wildlife Management Area in Hendry County.Photo by MyFWC - GFBT
(via: My Florida Wildlife Commission)

White Ibis and Roseate Spoonbills

at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, FL, USA

The roseate spoonbill is a member of the ibis family but you wouldn’t think so because of its luminous pale pink plumage with red highlights or the long bill with the spoon-shaped tip. The spatulate bill of this species has an important function. It has sensitive nerve endings that help the spoonbill detect prey. As it sweeps the bill from side to side through shallow water, the spoonbill encounters small fish, shrimp, crayfish, fiddler crabs and aquatic insects, which it snaps up and swallows.

The diet of the white ibis primarily consists of crabs, crayfish, fish, snakes, frogs and insects. This species is found throughout most of Florida. The main threat to both birds is loss of coastal habitat and freshwater feeding areas to development.

In Florida, ook for flocks of ibis and spoonbills at Fort De Soto County Park in Pinellas County or Dinner Island Ranch Wildlife Management Area in Hendry County.

Photo by MyFWC - GFBT

(via: My Florida Wildlife Commission)

How will North American birds survive in the face of climate change? 
“When we think of climate change, we automatically think warmer temperatures,” says one Oregon State University scientist studying the issue. 
"But our analysis found that for many species, it is precipitation that most affects the long-term survival of many bird species."Photo: A female broad-tailed hummingbird visits larkspur flowers. Credit: David W. Inouye, University of Maryland

How will North American birds survive in the face of climate change?

“When we think of climate change, we automatically think warmer temperatures,” says one Oregon State University scientist studying the issue.

"But our analysis found that for many species, it is precipitation that most affects the long-term survival of many bird species."

Photo: A female broad-tailed hummingbird visits larkspur flowers. Credit: David W. Inouye, University of Maryland

'Our Birds': Migratory Journeys Converge In Baltimore Gardens

Central American immigrants in Baltimore, MD are helping migratory song birds that make the seasonal journey from their old home countries to the city they now call home.

by Ricardo Sandoval-Palos and Lauren Migaki

A couple of times a month, a group of migrant women and their children gather to plant shrubs and flowers in Baltimore’s expansive Patterson Park.

The gardens feed and shelter migratory birds as part of the Patterson Park Audubon Center’s Bird Ambassadors program.

Neotropical birds like the black-throated blue warbler and the Baltimore oriole migrate from the East Coast down to places like Mexico and Central America for the winter, says Susie Creamer, director of urban education and conservation at the center…

(read more and listen: NPR.org)

photos by Susie Creamer/Patterson Park Audubon Center & USFWS-NE Region