cool-critters

cool-critters:

Agami heron (Agamia agami)

The agami heron is a medium-sized heron. It is a resident breeding bird from Central America south to Peru and Brazil. The agami heron’s habitat is forest swamps and similar wooded wetlands. They nest in colonies on platforms of sticks in trees over water, which may gather more than 100 nests. It is short-legged for a heron, but has a very long thin bill. Agami herons stalk their fish prey in shaded shallow water, often standing still or moving very slowly. They rarely wade in open water. They also take frogs, small reptiles, and snails.

photo credits: Leonardo C. Fleck, agamiheron, Leif G

annmarcaida

annmarcaida:

image

The last lonely passenger pigeon died in 1914. Her stuffed body is on display at the Smithsonian Institution. I’ve seen her. It’s a sad exhibit.

But what if passenger pigeons could be reincarnated?

That’s the idea behind de-extinction. Take DNA harvested from museum specimens and…

libutron
libutron:

Red-throated Bee-eater - Merops bullocki
As its common name suggestsMerops bullocki (Coraciiformes - Meropidae) has a distinctive scarlet throat, green upperparts with buffy hindneck, buff breast and belly, blue thighs and under tail-coverts.
The Red-throated Bee-eater is a colonial and noisy bird native to Eastern Africa.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Adam Riley | Locality: Upper West Region, Ghana (2014)

libutron:

Red-throated Bee-eater - Merops bullocki

As its common name suggestsMerops bullocki (Coraciiformes - Meropidae) has a distinctive scarlet throat, green upperparts with buffy hindneck, buff breast and belly, blue thighs and under tail-coverts.

The Red-throated Bee-eater is a colonial and noisy bird native to Eastern Africa.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Adam Riley | Locality: Upper West Region, Ghana (2014)

Heading to the beach this holiday weekend? 
Watch out for nesting birds and chicks!  Share the beach with birds by observing posted signs and steering clear of areas where birds are gathered. Enjoy watching the birds from a safe distance. Please do not approach or linger near with rare shorebirds like the piping plover or their nests.  Check out this video from The National Audubon Society and learn how you can share the shore with these adorable birds and other wildlife! Photo: Piping plovers on Drakes Island at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge in Maine. (Kaiti Titherington/USFWS)
(via: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service)

Heading to the beach this holiday weekend?

Watch out for nesting birds and chicks!

Share the beach with birds by observing posted signs and steering clear of areas where birds are gathered. Enjoy watching the birds from a safe distance. Please do not approach or linger near with rare shorebirds like the piping plover or their nests.

Check out this video from The National Audubon Society and learn how you can share the shore with these adorable birds and other wildlife!

Photo: Piping plovers on Drakes Island at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge in Maine. (Kaiti Titherington/USFWS)

(via: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service)

dendroica

explosionsoflife:

The only thing more shocking about the purple swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) than its plumage, is its diet. While it feeds mostly on vegetation, it is also known to eat the eggs and even the live young of other water birds. It is one of the largest members of the rail family (consisting of crakes, coots, and gallinules, among others), and its robust build allows it to more or less roam wherever it pleases within its range.

(Photo(s))

Houston Audubon:  Sanderling (Calidris alba)

Sanderlings are often seen on peninsula beaches. They are regularly found in small flocks running back and forth on the beach, picking through sargassum or probing for tiny prey in the wet sand left by receding waves. When not feeding they can be sleeping high on the beach in the dry sand.

Sanderlings are extreme long-distance migrants breeding only on High Arctic tundra. They are now returning to our beaches where many spend the winter. What a change for them to leave the chilly Arctic and arrive on the peninsula in August. We usually have some non-breeding Sanderlings on our beaches in the summer also.

Photographs by Greg Lavaty

(via: Houston Audubon)

Houston Audubon Society:

American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus)

The American Oystercatcher is probably the easiest Texas coastal shorebird to identify. Its bright red thin bill can be used to pry open oysters and clams and the easiest places to find them are on the oyster bars in Rollover Bay and Bolivar Flats. They do sometimes spend time on the beach eating odds and ends that are washed up on the shore and roosting at high tide.

Oystercatchers nest on the ground on small islands in Galveston Bay and are very vulnerable to human disturbances as well as storms. You may see oystercatcher families hanging around together this time of year, the young birds are the same size as their parents but the outer half of their bill is dark, it gets progressively redder as they mature.

Photographs by Greg Lavaty

(via: Houston Audubon)

dendroica

astronomy-to-zoology:

White-breasted Waterhen

 (Amaurornis phoenicurus)

is a bird of the family Rallidae (rails). they can be found throughout most of Southeast Asia and parts of India. they are large in terms of rails at 32cm long. like most rails they can be found in marshes and wet areas but are also seen in plains and higher hills. they have a diet of mostly fish small invertebrates and sees like most aquatic birds.

an individual can be identified by their white and black body with red tail feathers and yellow bill and legs. chicks like in all rails are pure black. they are also fairly vocal animals which is unusual among rails.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Gruiformes-Rallidae-Amauronis