elijahshandseight
elijahshandseight:

The cover for Matthew P. Martyniuk's new book Beasts of Antiquity: Stem-Birds in the Solnhofen Limestone. Can’t wait to read it!
More infos here: http://www.panaves.com/boa_solnhofen.html, http://dinogoss.blogspot.it/2014/08/beasts-of-antiquity.html, http://ktboundary-smnt2000.blogspot.it/2014/08/coming-soon-matthew-p-martyniuks-beasts.html

elijahshandseight:

The cover for Matthew P. Martyniuk's new book Beasts of Antiquity: Stem-Birds in the Solnhofen Limestone. Can’t wait to read it!

More infos here: http://www.panaves.com/boa_solnhofen.html, http://dinogoss.blogspot.it/2014/08/beasts-of-antiquity.htmlhttp://ktboundary-smnt2000.blogspot.it/2014/08/coming-soon-matthew-p-martyniuks-beasts.html

astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Kerguelen Tern (Sterna virgata)
…a species of tern (Sternidae) which breeds around the Kerguelen, Prince Edward, and Crozet Islands in the south Indian ocean. Like other tern species Kerguelen terns feed at sea on a variety of fish and marine invertebrates, they are also sometimes known feed on insects and fish from rivers on the Kerguelen islands. Unlike other terns Kerguelen terns are relative least-ranging, as they generally do not reach far into the seas near their breeding grounds. 
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Charadriiformes-Sternidae-Sterna-S. virgata

astronomy-to-zoology:

Kerguelen Tern (Sterna virgata)

…a species of tern (Sternidae) which breeds around the Kerguelen, Prince Edward, and Crozet Islands in the south Indian ocean. Like other tern species Kerguelen terns feed at sea on a variety of fish and marine invertebrates, they are also sometimes known feed on insects and fish from rivers on the Kerguelen islands. Unlike other terns Kerguelen terns are relative least-ranging, as they generally do not reach far into the seas near their breeding grounds. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Charadriiformes-Sternidae-Sterna-S. virgata

libutron
libutron:

Blue-cheeked Jacamar - Galbula cyanicollis 
Also referred to as Blue-necked Jacamar, Galbula cyanicollis (Piciformes - Galbulidae) is considered a species complex found across southern Amazonia, from eastern Peru and parts of Bolivia to east Amazonian Brazil.
This species can be easily distinguished by the yellow lower mandible and the bluish head and neck sides.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Ciro Albano | Locality: Brazil (2013)

libutron:

Blue-cheeked Jacamar - Galbula cyanicollis 

Also referred to as Blue-necked Jacamar, Galbula cyanicollis (Piciformes - Galbulidae) is considered a species complex found across southern Amazonia, from eastern Peru and parts of Bolivia to east Amazonian Brazil.

This species can be easily distinguished by the yellow lower mandible and the bluish head and neck sides.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Ciro Albano | Locality: Brazil (2013)

dendroica
dendroica:

Bird of the Week: Military Macaw

The Military Macaw probably got its name from the military personnel who first imported the birds to Europe as pets. In the wild, this parrot occurs in three subspecies throughout a large but fragmented range extending from Mexico to Argentina.
Like the Great Green, Blue-throated, and Lear’s Macaws, these beautiful and intelligent parrots are popular cage birds, widely captured for the pet trade within their home countries. Another major threat to these macaws is habitat loss, caused mainly by deforestation for agriculture and settlement.
Like other parrots, Military Macaws are quite noisy; their raucous calls and shrieks can be heard far and wide as flocks travel between roosts, nests, and feeding sites. Favored foraging areas are the highest outer branches of trees, where these macaws forage for fruits and nuts. They nest in tree cavities and on high cliff faces. Once mated, pairs stay together for life…
(read more)

dendroica:

Bird of the Week: Military Macaw

The Military Macaw probably got its name from the military personnel who first imported the birds to Europe as pets. In the wild, this parrot occurs in three subspecies throughout a large but fragmented range extending from Mexico to Argentina.

Like the Great Green, Blue-throated, and Lear’s Macaws, these beautiful and intelligent parrots are popular cage birds, widely captured for the pet trade within their home countries. Another major threat to these macaws is habitat loss, caused mainly by deforestation for agriculture and settlement.

Like other parrots, Military Macaws are quite noisy; their raucous calls and shrieks can be heard far and wide as flocks travel between roosts, nests, and feeding sites. Favored foraging areas are the highest outer branches of trees, where these macaws forage for fruits and nuts. They nest in tree cavities and on high cliff faces. Once mated, pairs stay together for life…

(read more)

libutron
jadafitch:

Passenger Pigeons (Ectopistes migratorius)
This September is the 100th anniversary of the extinction of the Passenger Pigeon.In the nineteenth century, the Passenger Pigeon was one of the most common birds in the world.  There are records of flocks that stretched a mile long and contained billions of birds.  By the early twentieth century though, they were nearly extinct.  After European settlers arrived, much of their habitat was destroyed, and they were exploited as an inexpensive food source.  By the time it was understood that the Passenger Pigeon needed protection, it was too late.  Martha, the very last one died one hundred years ago, on September 1st 1914.  The loss of this beautiful bird gained public’s attention, which resulted in many new conservation and protection law and practices. 

jadafitch:

Passenger Pigeons (Ectopistes migratorius)

This September is the 100th anniversary of the extinction of the Passenger Pigeon.

In the nineteenth century, the Passenger Pigeon was one of the most common birds in the world.  There are records of flocks that stretched a mile long and contained billions of birds.  By the early twentieth century though, they were nearly extinct.  After European settlers arrived, much of their habitat was destroyed, and they were exploited as an inexpensive food source.  By the time it was understood that the Passenger Pigeon needed protection, it was too late.  Martha, the very last one died one hundred years ago, on September 1st 1914.  The loss of this beautiful bird gained public’s attention, which resulted in many new conservation and protection law and practices. 

dendroica
dendroica:

Spotted Owls Using Burned Sierra Forest Slated for Logging

by Chris Clark
More than 250,000 acres of Sierra Nevada forest land burned in the 2013 Rim Fire is turning out to be pretty good habitat for California spotted owls, and a group of wildlife protection organizations is asking the U.S. Forest Service to rethink plans to log the burned areas.
In the spring and summer of this year, USFS biologists found 33 breeding pairs of the diminutive owls in forests burned by the Rim Fire, along with six single owls. Most of the owls found were on land slated for salvage logging in the USFS’s “Rim Fire Recovery” Project. The logging project would take out trees on about 30,000 acres of land, making it one of the largest salvage logging operations in USFS history…

(read more: ReWild | KCET)

dendroica:

Spotted Owls Using Burned Sierra Forest Slated for Logging

by Chris Clark

More than 250,000 acres of Sierra Nevada forest land burned in the 2013 Rim Fire is turning out to be pretty good habitat for California spotted owls, and a group of wildlife protection organizations is asking the U.S. Forest Service to rethink plans to log the burned areas.

In the spring and summer of this year, USFS biologists found 33 breeding pairs of the diminutive owls in forests burned by the Rim Fire, along with six single owls. Most of the owls found were on land slated for salvage logging in the USFS’s “Rim Fire Recovery” Project. The logging project would take out trees on about 30,000 acres of land, making it one of the largest salvage logging operations in USFS history…

(read more: ReWild | KCET)

While colour is an important signal for birds, so, apparently, is smell. 
For the first time, scientists have shown that crimson rosellas can sniff out their own subspecies by the smell of their feathers.
by Karl Gruber
A bird’s sense of smell may be just as important as its sight in identifying family or potential mates.
Crimson rosellas (Platycercus elegans), colourful parrots that inhabit eastern and south-eastern Australia, can identify their own subspecies based on the odour of another bird’s plumage, according to a new Australian study.
The findings, published recently in the journal Animal Behaviour, represent the first known case of such ability in any bird species…
(read more: Australian Geographic)
photograph via Deacon University

While colour is an important signal for birds, so, apparently, is smell.

For the first time, scientists have shown that crimson rosellas can sniff out their own subspecies by the smell of their feathers.

by Karl Gruber

A bird’s sense of smell may be just as important as its sight in identifying family or potential mates.

Crimson rosellas (Platycercus elegans), colourful parrots that inhabit eastern and south-eastern Australia, can identify their own subspecies based on the odour of another bird’s plumage, according to a new Australian study.

The findings, published recently in the journal Animal Behaviour, represent the first known case of such ability in any bird species…

(read more: Australian Geographic)

photograph via Deacon University

New York City test facility aims to reduce bird-window collisions
via: Birdwatching.com
Up to a billion birds — including pretty Golden-winged Warbler (above) and dozens of other species — die in the United States every year after colliding with buildings. According to New York City Audubon, as many as 90,000 are killed in New York City alone. No doubt, building collisions are a reason why more than 200 species are declining.

So hopes are high that a test facility nearing completion on the grounds of the Bronx Zoo will help deliver an increasingly sought-after component of home and business construction — glass windows and doors that are more bird- and user-friendly.

A joint venture of American Bird Conservancy, New York City Audubon, New Jersey Audubon, and Ennead Architects LLP, the facility will evaluate products through highly refined testing protocols and provide scientifically sound feedback to manufacturers.

The facility will be the second in the United States. Experience gained at the first, a flight tunnel at the Powdermill Avian Research Center in Pennsylvania described in “Eye on Conservation” in February 2013, led to improvements in the New York tunnel. The new facility, for example, will use a standard daylight simulator to control for such variables as changing weather and light intensity…
(read more)
Photograph by Laura Erickson

New York City test facility aims to reduce bird-window collisions

via: Birdwatching.com

Up to a billion birds — including pretty Golden-winged Warbler (above) and dozens of other species — die in the United States every year after colliding with buildings. According to New York City Audubon, as many as 90,000 are killed in New York City alone. No doubt, building collisions are a reason why more than 200 species are declining.

So hopes are high that a test facility nearing completion on the grounds of the Bronx Zoo will help deliver an increasingly sought-after component of home and business construction — glass windows and doors that are more bird- and user-friendly.

A joint venture of American Bird Conservancy, New York City Audubon, New Jersey Audubon, and Ennead Architects LLP, the facility will evaluate products through highly refined testing protocols and provide scientifically sound feedback to manufacturers.

The facility will be the second in the United States. Experience gained at the first, a flight tunnel at the Powdermill Avian Research Center in Pennsylvania described in “Eye on Conservation” in February 2013, led to improvements in the New York tunnel. The new facility, for example, will use a standard daylight simulator to control for such variables as changing weather and light intensity…

(read more)

Photograph by Laura Erickson

California Quail (Callipepla californica) are very social birds. 
During the breeding season, females will often form multi-family flocks with other females and their young; frequently, multiple males - not always the genetic fathers of the chicks - will also join the group. 
Adults that participate in this tend to live longer than those that don’t, perhaps because of the greater number of eyes watching for predators. In the fall and winter, birds come together in coveys numbering as many as 75 individuals, typically including many family groups. 
During courtship and breeding, males and females call antiphonally - that is, they alternate calls in a form of duet. Both males and females bear the distinctive plume, though it is darker in males than females. The plume appears to be a single feather, but is actually made up of six. photograph by Len Blumin on Flickr
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

California Quail (Callipepla californica) are very social birds.

During the breeding season, females will often form multi-family flocks with other females and their young; frequently, multiple males - not always the genetic fathers of the chicks - will also join the group.

Adults that participate in this tend to live longer than those that don’t, perhaps because of the greater number of eyes watching for predators. In the fall and winter, birds come together in coveys numbering as many as 75 individuals, typically including many family groups.

During courtship and breeding, males and females call antiphonally - that is, they alternate calls in a form of duet. Both males and females bear the distinctive plume, though it is darker in males than females. The plume appears to be a single feather, but is actually made up of six.

photograph by Len Blumin on Flickr

(via: Peterson Field Guides)