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Trilepida macrolepis | ©Renato Gaiga    (Porto Velho, Rondônia, Brazil)
The Big-scaled Blind Snake, Trilepida macrolepis (Leptotyphlopidae) is  a fossorial blind snake, adapted to burrowing.
This species occurs in Panama, Colombia, Venezuela, Guyana, Surinam, French Guayana, and Brazil [1].
The generic name is derived from the Greek adjective tri (three) and Greek nouns cheilos (lip) and stoma (mouth), in allusion to the presence of three supralabial scales [2]. 

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Trilepida macrolepis | ©Renato Gaiga    (Porto Velho, Rondônia, Brazil)

The Big-scaled Blind Snake, Trilepida macrolepis (Leptotyphlopidae) is  a fossorial blind snake, adapted to burrowing.

This species occurs in Panama, Colombia, Venezuela, Guyana, Surinam, French Guayana, and Brazil [1].

The generic name is derived from the Greek adjective tri (three) and Greek nouns cheilos (lip) and stoma (mouth), in allusion to the presence of three supralabial scales [2]. 

reptilefacts

astronomy-to-zoology:

Western Slender Blind Snake (Leptotyphlops humilis)

Also known as the Western Threadsnake or the Western Blind Snake, the western slender blind snake is a species of thread snake (Leptotyphlopidae) that is native to the southwestern United States, South Florida, and northern Mexico. L. humilis typically inhabits deserts, scrub, and other areas where the soil is loose. 

Like other thread snakes L. humilis lives underground and has mostly vestigial eyes that have no real use for vision. L. humilis's diet is made up mostly of insects, as well as their larvae and eggs. They are pareticualry known to invade ant and termite nests to find food.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Squamata-Serpentes-Leptotyphlopidae-Leptotyphlops-L. humilis

Images: Eugene van der Pijll and Sam Murray

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Blind Snakes (Rhamphotyphlops braminus) | ©cowyeow
Two blind snake (Rhamphotyphlops braminus) together. the grey snake is about to shed. When blind snakes shed, their color changes much more drastically than for other snakes.
The Brahminy Blind Snake, Rhamphotyphlops braminus (Reptilia - Squamata - Serpentes - Typhlopidae), is a blind snake likely native to South Asia, but reported worldwide in Africa, including the Arabian Peninsula, Australia, India, Southeast Asia, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Mexico, the United States, and Central America. The blind snake shown were photographed in Hong Kong.
It is a small, dark, worm-like snake with smooth, shiny scales, a short head with no neck, a short tail which ends in a small spine, and light spots where the eyes should be. Color is typically dark brown, but can be pale or yellowish brown, or grey. The underside is lighter than the rest of the body.
A particular feature of this species is that is parthenogenetic, so all snakes are females that are capable of reproducing without males. They are oviparous, laying 2 to 7 tiny eggs.

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Blind Snakes (Rhamphotyphlops braminus) | ©cowyeow

Two blind snake (Rhamphotyphlops braminus) together. the grey snake is about to shed. When blind snakes shed, their color changes much more drastically than for other snakes.

The Brahminy Blind Snake, Rhamphotyphlops braminus (Reptilia - Squamata - Serpentes - Typhlopidae), is a blind snake likely native to South Asia, but reported worldwide in Africa, including the Arabian Peninsula, Australia, India, Southeast Asia, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Mexico, the United States, and Central America. The blind snake shown were photographed in Hong Kong.

It is a small, dark, worm-like snake with smooth, shiny scales, a short head with no neck, a short tail which ends in a small spine, and light spots where the eyes should be. Color is typically dark brown, but can be pale or yellowish brown, or grey. The underside is lighter than the rest of the body.

A particular feature of this species is that is parthenogenetic, so all snakes are females that are capable of reproducing without males. They are oviparous, laying 2 to 7 tiny eggs.

Pink Blind Snake Discovered in Madagascar
(story from 2007)
A pink worm-like snake has been rediscovered in Madagascar more than 100 years after it was first found. The snake, which is blind and measures about 10 in long, is described in the Feb. 1, 2007 edition of the journal Zootaxa.
The snake, named Xenotyphlops mocquardi, is one of 15 blind snakes species known from Madagascar. Blind snakes live underground or beneath a layer of rocks, sand, or leaves and rarely emerge from their hideouts. They have poor eyesight and rely primarily on smell and heat detection to locate their prey consisting of insects and insect larvae…
(read more: Monga Bay)

Pink Blind Snake Discovered in Madagascar

(story from 2007)

A pink worm-like snake has been rediscovered in Madagascar more than 100 years after it was first found. The snake, which is blind and measures about 10 in long, is described in the Feb. 1, 2007 edition of the journal Zootaxa.

The snake, named Xenotyphlops mocquardi, is one of 15 blind snakes species known from Madagascar. Blind snakes live underground or beneath a layer of rocks, sand, or leaves and rarely emerge from their hideouts. They have poor eyesight and rely primarily on smell and heat detection to locate their prey consisting of insects and insect larvae…

(read more: Monga Bay)

Shlegel’s Blind Snake (Rhinotyphlops shlegelii)

A snake in the blind snake family Typhlopidae, this species is native to Southern Africa. At a length of up to 95 cm (~ 37.5 inches). this si the largest species of blond snake int he world. This is an oviparous snake (egg laying) that spends most of its time underground, in arid and semi-arid habitats.

(photos: T - Bryan Maritz; B - Simon J. Tonge)

Typhlops tycherus, endemic Honduras blindsnake  
First live and intact specimen of Typhlops tycherus, collected near the type locality in El Cedral, 1,550 m elevation, Montana de Santa Barbara, Honduras.  
Townsend JH, LD Wilson, LP Ketzler, IR Luque-Montes. 2008. The largest blindsnake in Mesoamerica: a new species of Typhlops (Squamata: Typhlopidae) from an isolated karstic mountain in Honduras. Zootaxa 1932: 18–26.
(photo/text: Josiah Townsend)

Typhlops tycherus, endemic Honduras blindsnake  

First live and intact specimen of Typhlops tycherus, collected near the type locality in El Cedral, 1,550 m elevation, Montana de Santa Barbara, Honduras.  

Townsend JH, LD Wilson, LP Ketzler, IR Luque-Montes. 2008. The largest blindsnake in Mesoamerica: a new species of Typhlops (Squamata: Typhlopidae) from an isolated karstic mountain in Honduras. Zootaxa 1932: 18–26.

(photo/text: Josiah Townsend)

Western Blind Snake (Leptotyphlops humilis)
- Kofa National Wildlife Refuge, AZ, USA
Aka Western Thread Snake. The body is very thin, and it reaches a max length of 12 inches (30 cm). This blind fossorial (burrowing) snake is found in the SW united States and in Northern Mexico. The eyes are vestigial and located beneath a layer of skin. They feed mainly on ants and termites, and their eggs and larvae.
(photo: C. Hayes)

Western Blind Snake (Leptotyphlops humilis)

- Kofa National Wildlife Refuge, AZ, USA

Aka Western Thread Snake. The body is very thin, and it reaches a max length of 12 inches (30 cm). This blind fossorial (burrowing) snake is found in the SW united States and in Northern Mexico. The eyes are vestigial and located beneath a layer of skin. They feed mainly on ants and termites, and their eggs and larvae.

(photo: C. Hayes)

Blindsnakes (family Typhlopidae)
They are found mostly in the tropical regions of Africa, Asia, the Americas, and all mainland Australia and various islands. The rostral scale overhangs the mouth to form a shovel like burrowing  structure. They live underground in burrows, and since they have no use  for vision, their eyes are mostly vestigial.  They have light-detecting black eyespots, and teeth occur in the upper  jaw. The tail ends with a horn like scale. Most of these species are  oviparous. Currently, 6 genera are recognized containing 203 species… (read more: Wikipedia)
(photo: Leptotyphlops drewesi, Kenya, by D. Lin)

Blindsnakes (family Typhlopidae)

They are found mostly in the tropical regions of Africa, Asia, the Americas, and all mainland Australia and various islands. The rostral scale overhangs the mouth to form a shovel like burrowing structure. They live underground in burrows, and since they have no use for vision, their eyes are mostly vestigial. They have light-detecting black eyespots, and teeth occur in the upper jaw. The tail ends with a horn like scale. Most of these species are oviparous. Currently, 6 genera are recognized containing 203 species… (read more: Wikipedia)

(photo: Leptotyphlops drewesi, Kenya, by D. Lin)

Beaked Blind Snake (Rhinotyphlops acutus)
The Beaked Blind Snake is largest among the Indian Worm snakes and can grow upto 600mm, the one I had was about 400mm. They are they only species with a beaked snout. Found commonly in the peninsular India south of the Gangetic plain but rarer south of latitude 16ºN. An interesting folklore / myth associated with blind snake is that they enter ears of people sleeping on the ground. this has resulted in the Tamil name of the snake Sevi pamboo, literally translated it means ear snake.

(text/photos: Tarique Sani)

Beaked Blind Snake (Rhinotyphlops acutus)

The Beaked Blind Snake is largest among the Indian Worm snakes and can grow upto 600mm, the one I had was about 400mm. They are they only species with a beaked snout. Found commonly in the peninsular India south of the Gangetic plain but rarer south of latitude 16ºN. An interesting folklore / myth associated with blind snake is that they enter ears of people sleeping on the ground. this has resulted in the Tamil name of the snake Sevi pamboo, literally translated it means ear snake.

(text/photos: Tarique Sani)