libutron
libutron:

BlueBox - Hawaiian Reef | ©Barry Fackler
Ostracion meleagris (Tetraodontiformes - Ostraciidae) is a boxfish commonly known as White-spotted boxfish.
This species occurs in the Indo-Pacific and Eastern Pacific: East Africa to the Mexico, north to southern Japan and the Hawaiian Islands, south to New Caledonia and the Tuamoto Islands. The subspecies Ostracion meleagris camurum is found in the Hawaiian Islands and Ostracion meleagris clippertonense in the Eastern Pacific.
 Source

libutron:

BlueBox - Hawaiian Reef | ©Barry Fackler

Ostracion meleagris (Tetraodontiformes - Ostraciidae) is a boxfish commonly known as White-spotted boxfish.

This species occurs in the Indo-Pacific and Eastern Pacific: East Africa to the Mexico, north to southern Japan and the Hawaiian Islands, south to New Caledonia and the Tuamoto Islands. The subspecies Ostracion meleagris camurum is found in the Hawaiian Islands and Ostracion meleagris clippertonense in the Eastern Pacific.

Source

Portrait of a juvenile boxfish, 1 cm long, collected by a bluewater diver in the top 30 meters of the Celebes Sea water column, from the Exploring the Inner Space of the Celebes Sea 2007 exploration. This exploration discovered what may be new marine species in the world’s most biologically diverse region, the dark deep Celebes Sea in the southern Philippines.
Image courtesy of Exploring the Inner Space of the Celebes Sea 2007 Exploration, NOAA-OE.

Portrait of a juvenile boxfish, 1 cm long, collected by a bluewater diver in the top 30 meters of the Celebes Sea water column, from the Exploring the Inner Space of the Celebes Sea 2007 exploration. This exploration discovered what may be new marine species in the world’s most biologically diverse region, the dark deep Celebes Sea in the southern Philippines.

Image courtesy of Exploring the Inner Space of the Celebes Sea 2007 Exploration, NOAA-OE.

explosionsoflife
explosionsoflife: Spotted Boxfish (Ostracion meleagris)

Length: 25cm
Location: Tropical reefs in Indian and south Pacific waters
Fun facts: Instead of a covering of scales, all boxfish are protected by a rigid box of fused bony plates under the skin. This means they cannot bend their body and must swim by beating their pectoral fins. A large tail gives some propulsion and is also used to help steer them like a rudder. They also secrete a poisonous slime from their skin that protects them from predators.

explosionsoflife: Spotted Boxfish (Ostracion meleagris)

Length: 25cm

Location: Tropical reefs in Indian and south Pacific waters

Fun facts: Instead of a covering of scales, all boxfish are protected by a rigid box of fused bony plates under the skin. This means they cannot bend their body and must swim by beating their pectoral fins. A large tail gives some propulsion and is also used to help steer them like a rudder. They also secrete a poisonous slime from their skin that protects them from predators.

eduardo-
eduardo-: Whitebarred Boxfish, (Anoplocapros lenticularis).

A  temperate species endemic to the southern and western reaches of the  Australian mainland rocky reefs, the Whitebarred Boxfish is an  underappreciated beauty. It is encased in a rigid, bone-like carapace  covered in ridges which act like stabalisers as it swims which offers an  unusual visual appeal.
It is a  species that displays sexual dichromatism. The male of the species  (shown here) is a vivid orange with solid white banding, whilst the  female and juvenile of the species are a less intense colouration  (tending to brown) with black and white blotching.

eduardo-Whitebarred Boxfish, (Anoplocapros lenticularis).

A temperate species endemic to the southern and western reaches of the Australian mainland rocky reefs, the Whitebarred Boxfish is an underappreciated beauty. It is encased in a rigid, bone-like carapace covered in ridges which act like stabalisers as it swims which offers an unusual visual appeal.

It is a species that displays sexual dichromatism. The male of the species (shown here) is a vivid orange with solid white banding, whilst the female and juvenile of the species are a less intense colouration (tending to brown) with black and white blotching.

fishly
juvenile Smooth Trunkfish (Lactophrys triqueter)
"Found on coral reefs. Solitary or in small groups. Feeds on a wide variety of small bottom invertebrates such as mollusks, crustaceans, worms, sessile tunicates and sponges exposed by a jet of water ejected through the mouth. Marketed fresh locally. Toxins released when excited kill other fishes. Easily approached…"
(info via: Encyclopedia of Life)

juvenile Smooth Trunkfish (Lactophrys triqueter)

"Found on coral reefs. Solitary or in small groups. Feeds on a wide variety of small bottom invertebrates such as mollusks, crustaceans, worms, sessile tunicates and sponges exposed by a jet of water ejected through the mouth. Marketed fresh locally. Toxins released when excited kill other fishes. Easily approached…"

(info via: Encyclopedia of Life)

animalworld
animalworld: SPOTTED TRUNKFISH (Lactophrys bicaudalis)  -  ©George Cathcart

The Spotted Trunkfish is a member of the family Ostraciidae. It can be found in reefs throughout the Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean as well as the south eastern Atlantic Ocean. The species gets its name from the black spots it has covered over its yellow/golden body.
The spotted trunkfish, like all trunkfish of the Genus Lactophrys, secretes a colorless ciguatera toxin from glands on its skin when touched. The toxin is only dangerous when ingested, so there’s no immediate harm to divers. Predators however, as large as nurse sharks, can die as a result of eating a trunkfish.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spotted_trunkfish
Other photos you may enjoy:
Pygmy Angelfish - Coral Beauty Angel
Parrotfish
Spanish Shawl Nudibranch
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theanimalblog:

trunkfish head on (by George Cathcart)

animalworld: SPOTTED TRUNKFISH (Lactophrys bicaudalis)  -  ©George Cathcart

The Spotted Trunkfish is a member of the family Ostraciidae. It can be found in reefs throughout the Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean as well as the south eastern Atlantic Ocean. The species gets its name from the black spots it has covered over its yellow/golden body.

The spotted trunkfish, like all trunkfish of the Genus Lactophrys, secretes a colorless ciguatera toxin from glands on its skin when touched. The toxin is only dangerous when ingested, so there’s no immediate harm to divers. Predators however, as large as nurse sharks, can die as a result of eating a trunkfish.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spotted_trunkfish

Other photos you may enjoy:

Pygmy Angelfish - Coral Beauty Angel

Parrotfish

Spanish Shawl Nudibranch

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theanimalblog:

trunkfish head on (by George Cathcart)