ichthyologist
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Fish from Acidic Waters Less Able to SmellFish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor are less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study.The study confirms laboratory experiments showing that the behavior of reef fishes can be seriously affected by increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the ocean. The new study is the first to analyze the sensory impairment of fish from CO2 seeps, where pH is similar to what climate models forecast for surface waters by the turn of the century.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fish-acidic-waters-less-able-smell

laboratoryequipment:

Fish from Acidic Waters Less Able to Smell

Fish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor are less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study.

The study confirms laboratory experiments showing that the behavior of reef fishes can be seriously affected by increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the ocean. The new study is the first to analyze the sensory impairment of fish from CO2 seeps, where pH is similar to what climate models forecast for surface waters by the turn of the century.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fish-acidic-waters-less-able-smell

Canada’s government has broken every climate promise on the book 
… and now they want to roll out a massive network of tar sands pipelines, starting with Keystone XL. This great op-ed ran in the NY Times this week calling out their failures — it’s worth reading in full, and sharing to call out their disastrous policy…New York Times:  Is CanadaTarring Itself?
(via: 350.org on Facebook)

Canada’s government has broken every climate promise on the book

… and now they want to roll out a massive network of tar sands pipelines, starting with Keystone XL. This great op-ed ran in the NY Times this week calling out their failures — it’s worth reading in full, and sharing to call out their disastrous policy…

New York Times:  Is CanadaTarring Itself?

(via: 350.org on Facebook)

A Warming World Is Shrinking Salamanders
by Sarah C.P. Williams
Salamanders in the southern Appalachian Mountains of Tennessee, North Carolina, and Virginia have gotten smaller over the past 50 years due to increasing temperatures in their habitats, a new study has concluded. It’s the first confirmation that climate change can alter body size, a connection that had only been hypothesized in the past, and one of the fastest studied responses to changing temperatures on record.
“This is helping us understand yet another way in which climate change could play out,” says ecologist Michael Adams of the U.S. Geological Survey in Corvallis, Oregon, who was not involved in the new work. “In this case, we’re learning how it can change the life history of an organism.”
Karen Lips, a biologist at the University of Maryland, College Park, wanted to determine what was behind dropping numbers of Plethodontidae, or lungless salamanders, across the eastern United States. The Appalachians are home to more salamander species than any place on Earth, many unique to the area. The Plethodontidae, the most numerous, represent a large and diverse family of salamanders that all respire through their skin. The salamanders play a key role in the ecosystems of the mountains, consuming insects that are too tiny for most other vertebrates…
(read more: Science News/AAAS)
photo: northern gray-cheeked salamander, Plethodon montanus, by Michael Redmer/Visuals Unlimited/Corbis

A Warming World Is Shrinking Salamanders

by Sarah C.P. Williams

Salamanders in the southern Appalachian Mountains of Tennessee, North Carolina, and Virginia have gotten smaller over the past 50 years due to increasing temperatures in their habitats, a new study has concluded. It’s the first confirmation that climate change can alter body size, a connection that had only been hypothesized in the past, and one of the fastest studied responses to changing temperatures on record.

“This is helping us understand yet another way in which climate change could play out,” says ecologist Michael Adams of the U.S. Geological Survey in Corvallis, Oregon, who was not involved in the new work. “In this case, we’re learning how it can change the life history of an organism.”

Karen Lips, a biologist at the University of Maryland, College Park, wanted to determine what was behind dropping numbers of Plethodontidae, or lungless salamanders, across the eastern United States. The Appalachians are home to more salamander species than any place on Earth, many unique to the area. The Plethodontidae, the most numerous, represent a large and diverse family of salamanders that all respire through their skin. The salamanders play a key role in the ecosystems of the mountains, consuming insects that are too tiny for most other vertebrates…

(read more: Science News/AAAS)

photo: northern gray-cheeked salamander, Plethodon montanus, by Michael Redmer/Visuals Unlimited/Corbis

Brighter Days For the Long-tailed Tit
Climate change could be beneficial for at least one little woodland bird.
When it comes to climate change, there will be some winners and a lot of losers: The World Wildlife Fund estimates that up 40 percent of Europe’s 426 bird species could disappear with just a 1 degree Celsius increase in temperature. But at least one little bird appears to be bucking the trend.
Brian Hatchwell’s team at University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom have studied the long-tailed tit’s breeding habits for more 20 years. Three years ago, they began a project to study how climate affects the birds’ breeding. 
Populations of the long-tailed tit, a diminutive passerine, ballooned in the last 45 years. There are now twice as many tits living in the U.K. than there were in 1969. And the team thinks a warmer spring breeding season is behind it. 
The long-tailed tit’s nesting season, typically from March to May, is nothing short of a two-month marathon. Their nests, woven from spider silk, feathers, and brush to be elastic enough to expand as their offspring grow, demand a huge amount of labor. In the four to five weeks it takes to build one, a single tit will fly a total of 300 miles shuttling materials back and forth…
(read more: Audubon Magazine)
photo: Alan Shearman

Brighter Days For the Long-tailed Tit

Climate change could be beneficial for at least one little woodland bird.

When it comes to climate change, there will be some winners and a lot of losers: The World Wildlife Fund estimates that up 40 percent of Europe’s 426 bird species could disappear with just a 1 degree Celsius increase in temperature. But at least one little bird appears to be bucking the trend.

Brian Hatchwell’s team at University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom have studied the long-tailed tit’s breeding habits for more 20 years. Three years ago, they began a project to study how climate affects the birds’ breeding. 

Populations of the long-tailed tit, a diminutive passerine, ballooned in the last 45 years. There are now twice as many tits living in the U.K. than there were in 1969. And the team thinks a warmer spring breeding season is behind it. 

The long-tailed tit’s nesting season, typically from March to May, is nothing short of a two-month marathon. Their nests, woven from spider silk, feathers, and brush to be elastic enough to expand as their offspring grow, demand a huge amount of labor. In the four to five weeks it takes to build one, a single tit will fly a total of 300 miles shuttling materials back and forth…

(read more: Audubon Magazine)

photo: Alan Shearman

What Chickadees Can Tell Us About Climate Change
by Sandy Bauers
When the project began in 1998, the Chester County population was all Carolinas. Nolde Forest had a mix of Carolinas and hybrids. At Hawk Mountain, blackcaps dominated.
But as the research continued over the years, that changed. Today, almost half of Hawk Mountain’s chickadees are hybrids. And if there’s a chickadee at your feeder in Southeastern Pennsylvania or South Jersey - unless it’s an “irruption,” an unusual year in which blackcaps move southward - the bird is likely a Carolina.
Curry’s collaborators in the project, Cornell University and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in New York, analyzed nearly 200 blood samples the students collected. The scientists also collated citizen bird sightings reported to online database eBird, and studied temperature records.
One climate-change variable shifting in this region has been the average minimum temperature in winter, this year’s deep freeze notwithstanding…
(read more: http://articles.philly.com/2014-03-19/news/48334893_1_chickadees-hybrids-hawk-mountain-sanctuary)

What Chickadees Can Tell Us About Climate Change

by Sandy Bauers

When the project began in 1998, the Chester County population was all Carolinas. Nolde Forest had a mix of Carolinas and hybrids. At Hawk Mountain, blackcaps dominated.

But as the research continued over the years, that changed. Today, almost half of Hawk Mountain’s chickadees are hybrids. And if there’s a chickadee at your feeder in Southeastern Pennsylvania or South Jersey - unless it’s an “irruption,” an unusual year in which blackcaps move southward - the bird is likely a Carolina.

Curry’s collaborators in the project, Cornell University and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in New York, analyzed nearly 200 blood samples the students collected. The scientists also collated citizen bird sightings reported to online database eBird, and studied temperature records.

One climate-change variable shifting in this region has been the average minimum temperature in winter, this year’s deep freeze notwithstanding…

(read more: http://articles.philly.com/2014-03-19/news/48334893_1_chickadees-hybrids-hawk-mountain-sanctuary)

Fossils Put Dent in Geoengineering Claims
by Becky Oskin
During Earth’s last ice age, iron dust dumped into the ocean fertilized the garden of the sea, feeding a plankton bloom that soaked up carbon dioxide from the air, a new study confirms.
But the results deal a blow to some geoengineering schemes that claim that people may be able use iron fertilization to slow global warming. The planet’s natural experiment shows it would take at least a thousand years to lower carbon dioxide levels by 40 parts per million — the amount of the drop during the ice age.
Meanwhile, carbon dioxide is now increasing by 2 parts per million yearly, so in about 20 years human emissions could add another 40 parts per million of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Levels currently hover around 400 parts per million.
"Even if we could reproduce what works in the natural world, it’s not going to solve the carbon dioxide problem,” said Alfredo Martínez-García, a climate scientist at ETH Zurich in Switzerland and author of the study, published today (March 20) in the journal Science…
(read more: Live Science)
image: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Fossils Put Dent in Geoengineering Claims

by Becky Oskin

During Earth’s last ice age, iron dust dumped into the ocean fertilized the garden of the sea, feeding a plankton bloom that soaked up carbon dioxide from the air, a new study confirms.

But the results deal a blow to some geoengineering schemes that claim that people may be able use iron fertilization to slow global warming. The planet’s natural experiment shows it would take at least a thousand years to lower carbon dioxide levels by 40 parts per million — the amount of the drop during the ice age.

Meanwhile, carbon dioxide is now increasing by 2 parts per million yearly, so in about 20 years human emissions could add another 40 parts per million of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Levels currently hover around 400 parts per million.

"Even if we could reproduce what works in the natural world, it’s not going to solve the carbon dioxide problem,” said Alfredo Martínez-García, a climate scientist at ETH Zurich in Switzerland and author of the study, published today (March 20) in the journal Science…

(read more: Live Science)

image: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

March 12th, the European Parliament passed a resolution supporting the creation of an Arctic Sanctuary covering the vast high Arctic around the North Pole, giving official status to an idea that has been pushed by activists for years. Still, the sanctuary has a long road to go before becoming a reality: as Arctic sea ice rapidly declines due to climate change, there has been rising interest from governments and industries to exploit the once inaccessible wilderness for fish and fossil fuels…

Sponges Likely Paved the Way For All Life on Earth
 by Jennifer Viegas
The seemingly lowly sponge, just by its very existence, might have paved the way for the evolution of complex life forms, including our own species, according to a new paper.
Sponges appear to have added oxygen to the deep ocean, creating an environment where more mobile, major oxygen-using animals could have evolved, holds the paper, published in the latest Nature Geoscience.
The research builds on work, presented earlier this year, which found that the most primitive sponges probably could survive in water containing very low levels of oxygen…
(read more: Discovery News)
photo: Deep Sea Expedition, 2007, NOAA-OE

Sponges Likely Paved the Way For All Life on Earth

by Jennifer Viegas

The seemingly lowly sponge, just by its very existence, might have paved the way for the evolution of complex life forms, including our own species, according to a new paper.

Sponges appear to have added oxygen to the deep ocean, creating an environment where more mobile, major oxygen-using animals could have evolved, holds the paper, published in the latest Nature Geoscience.

The research builds on work, presented earlier this year, which found that the most primitive sponges probably could survive in water containing very low levels of oxygen…

(read more: Discovery News)

photo: Deep Sea Expedition, 2007, NOAA-OE

Moose. Atlantic salmon. Piping plover. Canada lynx. Atlantic puffin. 
These are some of the 168 vulnerable species in Maine that could experience large range shifts and population decline by 2100 as a result of climate change. Find out what other species are vulnerable to warming temperature and rising sea levels in the report released today in conjunction with Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences, Maine Audubon, and Maine Nature Conservancy. 
Read the report here.
(via: USFWS Northeast Region)

Moose. Atlantic salmon. Piping plover. Canada lynx. Atlantic puffin.

These are some of the 168 vulnerable species in Maine that could experience large range shifts and population decline by 2100 as a result of climate change. Find out what other species are vulnerable to warming temperature and rising sea levels in the report released today in conjunction with Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences, Maine Audubon, and Maine Nature Conservancy.

Read the report here.

(via: USFWS Northeast Region)

Fantasies of a renewable future obscure our big climate responsibilities, says Ozzie Zehner in ‘Green Illusions.’

As epic drought ravages North America and Arctic ice melts to record low levels, some of the most apocalyptic predictions of climate science are coming true ahead of schedule. Climate change’s severity has become all too apparent in 2012, and calls to end the reign of fossil fuels grow ever stronger.

Bill McKibben’s article on “Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math" elicited millions of views, 112,000 Facebook likes, and over 5,000 comments as it elucidated the problem of fossil fuel companies and their unwillingness to set a price on carbon, address global warming or embrace an energy alternative. Though what would that alternative look like?