This Columbian white-tailed deer and her twins were recently seen on Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge. 
In 2013 and 2014, the Service translocated Columbian white-tailed deer, which are listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act, from Julia Butler Hansen National Wildlife Refuge to Ridgefield NWR in Washington State. 
The deer have taken to their new home and are successfully adding to their numbers, with a current population estimate of 45 deer. 
“We would not witness this if it wasn’t for everyone’s support and strong commitment to this project,” said Ridgefield Refuge Manager Christopher Lapp. “This is truly a partnership success story.” Read more about the emergency relocation in 2013: here
(via: USFWS_Pacific Region)

This Columbian white-tailed deer and her twins were recently seen on Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge.

In 2013 and 2014, the Service translocated Columbian white-tailed deer, which are listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act, from Julia Butler Hansen National Wildlife Refuge to Ridgefield NWR in Washington State.

The deer have taken to their new home and are successfully adding to their numbers, with a current population estimate of 45 deer.

We would not witness this if it wasn’t for everyone’s support and strong commitment to this project,” said Ridgefield Refuge Manager Christopher Lapp. “This is truly a partnership success story.

Read more about the emergency relocation in 2013: here

(via: USFWS_Pacific Region)

Conservation: Crowdsourcing the Olinguito

via: Smithsonian Science

One year ago, the olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina) stepped out of the forest shadows into the spotlight and onto the pages of science—the first carnivore species in the Americas to do so in 35 years. However, while the discovery offered an official identity, the olinguito still remained a mammal of mystery. What exactly did it eat? How big was its range? And could it be possible, just possible, that a baby olinguito is even cuter than an adult?

The few photos and three seconds of grainy video the Smithsonian scientists had for the initial species description were not offering up many answers. Despite that, answers did come—not through new expeditions to the olinguito’s native cloud forests of Colombia and Ecuador, but through emails to the scientists from people living or vacationing in those areas.

While the olinguito may look like a cross between a house cat and a teddy bear, it is actually the latest (and smallest) documented member of the family Procyonidae, which it shares with raccoons, coatis, kinkajous and olingos. The 2-pound olinguito, with its large eyes and woolly orange-brown fur, is also the newest species in the order Carnivora―an incredibly rare discovery in the 21st century…

(read more: Smithsonian)

photos: Steve Blain, Juan Rendon, and Georges Cruzat

Amazon’s Biggest Fish Faces Threat of Extinction
by Elizabeth Palermo
Measuring 10 ft (3 m) long and weighing in at more than 400 lbs (180 kg), it’s hard to imagine that the arapaima, the largest fish in the Amazon River basin, could ever go missing. But these huge fish are quickly disappearing from Brazilian waterways, according to a new study.
A recent survey of fishing communities in the state of Amazonas, Brazil, found that the arapaima is already extinct in some parts of the Amazon basin. In other parts of the Amazon, its numbers are rapidly dwindling…
(read more: Live Science)
photo by Sergio Ricardo de Oliveira

Amazon’s Biggest Fish Faces Threat of Extinction

by Elizabeth Palermo

Measuring 10 ft (3 m) long and weighing in at more than 400 lbs (180 kg), it’s hard to imagine that the arapaima, the largest fish in the Amazon River basin, could ever go missing. But these huge fish are quickly disappearing from Brazilian waterways, according to a new study.

A recent survey of fishing communities in the state of Amazonas, Brazil, found that the arapaima is already extinct in some parts of the Amazon basin. In other parts of the Amazon, its numbers are rapidly dwindling…

(read more: Live Science)

photo by Sergio Ricardo de Oliveira

A Conversation With ‘Her Deepness’

Sylvia Earle, the greatest living ocean explorer, sits down with OnEarth.

She knows the ocean better than any other person alive. Reverently nicknamed “Her Deepness,” Sylvia Earle has spent 7,000 hours underwater over seven decades.

And on those dives she has witnessed first hand the havoc we wreak upon the sea—from coral bleaching and shark finning to the disappearance of once-abundant species such as tuna and menhaden. She has received virtually every honor in exploration and conservation science, and has served as chief scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. When Sylvia Earle talks about the ocean, you listen.

Mission Blue, a documentary about her life and work that carries the name of Dr. Earle’s ocean conservation organization, debuts today on Netflix and in theatres. She spoke with OnEarth about her career, the film, and, of course, the state of the world’s oceans.„

(read more: On Earth)

dendroica

scienceyoucanlove:

Large mammals are being lost from Brazil’s Atlantic rainforest much faster than expected, according to a recent study. 

The study, undertaken by scientists from Brazil and the UK, looked at 18 mammal species in 196 forest fragments, and compared their current populations to estimates of their population densities before Europeans colonised the region about 500 years ago.

The results of the study, published in the journal PLoS One, showed that mammals are being lost from forest fragments at least twice as fast as previous estimates suggested.

Staggering declines

Of over 3,500 mammal populations estimated to have originally lived in the study area, only about 22% remain today. Among the species being lost are large, charismatic mammals such as the jaguarlowland tapirnorthern muriqui and giant anteater, while the white-lipped peccary has been completely wiped out in the region…

(read more: Blog - Arkive.org)

Sea Turtle Rehab and Conservation 
Rehabilitated loggerhead sea turtle, Pine Tyme, is enjoying a nice “spa treatment” before her release this Friday! 
The great folks at The Turtle Hospital have been taking excellent care of this juvenile loggerhead, and now that she’s feeling 100% healthy, it’s time to send her back home to the ocean! 
Join us on Friday, Aug. 15 at 1pm on Sombrero Key, FL, to wish her good luck on her Tour de Turtles journey! 
Read Pine Tyme’s full bio online: Here
(via: Sea Turtle Conservancy)

Sea Turtle Rehab and Conservation

Rehabilitated loggerhead sea turtle, Pine Tyme, is enjoying a nice “spa treatment” before her release this Friday!

The great folks at The Turtle Hospital have been taking excellent care of this juvenile loggerhead, and now that she’s feeling 100% healthy, it’s time to send her back home to the ocean!

Join us on Friday, Aug. 15 at 1pm on Sombrero Key, FL, to wish her good luck on her Tour de Turtles journey!

Read Pine Tyme’s full bio online: Here

(via: Sea Turtle Conservancy)

GOOD NEWS:

New population of Critically Endangered parakeets found in Brazil

Researchers supported by the Conservation Leadership Programme have uncovered a small population of grey-breasted parakeets nesting on a mountain in north-east Brazil.

by Sarah Rakowski

A team of scientists searching for remnant populations of the Critically Endangered grey-breasted parakeet has found a small group nesting in a small crevice on the top of a rugged mountain ridge in north-east Brazil.

Only around 300 of these birds are thought to remain in the wild, all of which are found in the Brazilian state of Ceará.

As part of a national action plan for the species, researchers from local organisation Aquasis have searched more than 20 sites for signs of the parakeet, focusing their efforts on areas identified as having high habitat potential or historical sightings.

This new discovery brings the total number of known groups up to three. By comparison, historical data show that at least 15 separate populations once existed…

(read more: Fauna & Flora International)

photos by Fabio Nunes and Aquasis

Atlantic Puffins, Seal Island, ME
Who doesn’t love these charismatic seabirds? 
Project Puffin needs your help protecting Atlantic puffins. Tune in to one of the three webcams set up at Seal Island National Wildlife Refuge, take screenshots and share your observations. The work you do will aid biologists in determining feeding patterns and food sources and help the survival of the species 
Explore.org - PuffinCam
(via: USFWS Northeast Region)

Atlantic Puffins, Seal Island, ME

Who doesn’t love these charismatic seabirds?

Project Puffin needs your help protecting Atlantic puffins. Tune in to one of the three webcams set up at Seal Island National Wildlife Refuge, take screenshots and share your observations. The work you do will aid biologists in determining feeding patterns and food sources and help the survival of the species

Explore.org - PuffinCam

(via: USFWS Northeast Region)

The threat of traditional medicine:

China’s boom may mean doom for turtles

by Erin Crandall

For thousands of years turtles have been used in Chinese traditional medicine to treat a wide variety of ailments and diseases. Originally published in the journal Radiata and recently republished HerpDigest David S. Lee and Liao Shi Kun write, “[In Chinese culture] turtles are symbolic of long life, personal wealth, fertility, strength, and happy households.”

Despite a lack of scientific evidence demonstrating a causative link between turtle consumption and medicinal benefits, many people in China believe they provide benefits such as maintaining youthful beauty in women and improving sexual function in men.

Because of these beliefs and their symbolic importance, turtles have been highly sought after for more than 3,000 years. However, in recent years, China’s economy has changed in a way that has become increasingly threatening to the country’s wild turtle populations…

(read more: MongaBay)

photos: Chinese three-striped box turtle (Cuora trifasciata), critically endangered -  by Torsten Blanck; Reeves’ turtle (Mauremys reevesii) by O’Shea et al.

Just as you rely on wild places to rejuvenate and restore you, those places rely on you to keep them in good condition.

Even if you are aware of the basic notion of “pack it in, pack it out,” leaving no trace can often entail some details you might not think of. So that you can be mindful of all they ways you can impact the wild places you visit, here are some tips based on the seven Leave No Trace principles…

dendroica
dendroica:

Once-Common Marine Birds Disappearing from Our Coast (in Washington State)

Bird surveys like this and others done by plane are tracking a significant ecological shift in our region — a major decline in once-abundant marine birds. From white-winged scoters and surf scoters to long-tailed ducks, murres, loons and some seagulls, the number of everyday marine birds here has plummeted dramatically in recent decades.
Scoters are down more than 75 percent from what they were in the late 1970s. Murres have dropped even more. Western grebes have mostly vanished, falling from several hundred thousand birds to about 20,000.
The reasons often vary — from climate change and shoreline development to marine pollution and the rebound of predators such as bald eagles.
But several new studies now also link many dwindling marine bird populations to what they eat — especially herring, anchovies, sand lance and surf smelt, the tiny swimmers often dubbed forage fish…

(read more: The Seattle Times)

dendroica:

Once-Common Marine Birds Disappearing from Our Coast (in Washington State)

Bird surveys like this and others done by plane are tracking a significant ecological shift in our region — a major decline in once-abundant marine birds. From white-winged scoters and surf scoters to long-tailed ducks, murres, loons and some seagulls, the number of everyday marine birds here has plummeted dramatically in recent decades.

Scoters are down more than 75 percent from what they were in the late 1970s. Murres have dropped even more. Western grebes have mostly vanished, falling from several hundred thousand birds to about 20,000.

The reasons often vary — from climate change and shoreline development to marine pollution and the rebound of predators such as bald eagles.

But several new studies now also link many dwindling marine bird populations to what they eat — especially herring, anchovies, sand lance and surf smelt, the tiny swimmers often dubbed forage fish…

(read more: The Seattle Times)

moonstonebeginning
moonstonebeginning:

Bee Watering Station:
A great addition to your garden or back yard 
Bees need water just like we do but often times drown in open water. To make a bee watering station you can either do what is shown in the photo above and fill the bowl of a dog/cat watering jug with stones or you can fill a small dish with marbles and add water to that. That way the bees have something to land on!

moonstonebeginning:

Bee Watering Station:

A great addition to your garden or back yard 

Bees need water just like we do but often times drown in open water. To make a bee watering station you can either do what is shown in the photo above and fill the bowl of a dog/cat watering jug with stones or you can fill a small dish with marbles and add water to that. That way the bees have something to land on!

The Asian leaf turtle, Cyclemys dentata, is a species of turtle found in Southeast Asia. They are quite common in the pet trade, and because of this (as well as other factors), their numbers have decreased in the wild. It is an omnivorous species that will feed upon anything from vegetation, fish, insects, worms and even scavenge on carcasses.photograph by Bruce Rhind 
(via: 1stopbrunei Wildlife)

The Asian leaf turtle, Cyclemys dentata, is a species of turtle found in Southeast Asia. They are quite common in the pet trade, and because of this (as well as other factors), their numbers have decreased in the wild. It is an omnivorous species that will feed upon anything from vegetation, fish, insects, worms and even scavenge on carcasses.

photograph by Bruce Rhind

(via: 1stopbrunei Wildlife)

Zoo Helping Reintroduce Rare California Turtle Species
by Chris Jennewein
The San Diego Zoo is working with state and federal scientists to reintroduce a rare turtle species into a local ecological preserve and monitor their progress via tiny radio transmitters.
Five juvenile western pond turtles were released into the Sycuan Peak Ecological Reserve on Thursday by a team of federal, state and zoo scientists. The turtles are part of a “headstart” program which involves raising hatchlings at the zoo to a large enough size to give them a chance of fending off natural predators.
The turtles are sporting miniature radio transmitters applied with a flexible silicone sealant, which allows the young turtles’ shells to grow and expand, even with the transmitter device attached to it…
(read more: Times of San Diego)
Photograph by Ken Bohn/San Diego Zoo

Zoo Helping Reintroduce Rare California Turtle Species

by Chris Jennewein

The San Diego Zoo is working with state and federal scientists to reintroduce a rare turtle species into a local ecological preserve and monitor their progress via tiny radio transmitters.

Five juvenile western pond turtles were released into the Sycuan Peak Ecological Reserve on Thursday by a team of federal, state and zoo scientists. The turtles are part of a “headstart” program which involves raising hatchlings at the zoo to a large enough size to give them a chance of fending off natural predators.

The turtles are sporting miniature radio transmitters applied with a flexible silicone sealant, which allows the young turtles’ shells to grow and expand, even with the transmitter device attached to it…

(read more: Times of San Diego)

Photograph by Ken Bohn/San Diego Zoo