KEEP THE OIL IN THE GROUND IN THE AMAZON

To national, local, and international leaders:

The Amazon rainforest is critically important to the survival of our planet and the indigenous peoples that call it home. The International Energy Agency is unequivocal: two-thirds of fossil fuels need to be kept in the ground to avoid climate disaster. Given the science mandate to keep oil in the ground and the demands of our indigenous allies, the Amazon Basin is the perfect place to start.

Leave the oil in the ground!

Read the full text of the petition here.

(via: Amazon Watch)

American Intruder Lurks In Scottish Streams, Clawed And Hungry
by Ari Shapiro
The story starts in the streams and lakes of the northwestern United States, where North American signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) are a familiar sight. Turn over a rock and you may well encounter one.
But in Scottish streams and lochs, these creatures are intruders.
In the United States, we often hear about invasive Asian carp, zebra mussels or snakehead fish from China that take over American waterways. It’s a two-way street: American species are causing chaos in other parts of the world, too.
(In their native North American ecosystems) They eat aquatic insects and larvae; raccoons and herons, in turn, eat them. The system works. But those same crayfish wreak havoc in Scottish waters like Clyde’s Burn — a stream in Scotland where anglers from all over the world come to fish…
(read more: NPR)

American Intruder Lurks In Scottish Streams, Clawed And Hungry

by Ari Shapiro

The story starts in the streams and lakes of the northwestern United States, where North American signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) are a familiar sight. Turn over a rock and you may well encounter one.

But in Scottish streams and lochs, these creatures are intruders.

In the United States, we often hear about invasive Asian carp, zebra mussels or snakehead fish from China that take over American waterways. It’s a two-way street: American species are causing chaos in other parts of the world, too.

(In their native North American ecosystems) They eat aquatic insects and larvae; raccoons and herons, in turn, eat them. The system works. But those same crayfish wreak havoc in Scottish waters like Clyde’s Burn — a stream in Scotland where anglers from all over the world come to fish…

(read more: NPR)

turtleconservancy
turtleconservancy:

A young Pig-Nosed Turtle (Carettochelys insculpta), from New Guinea and Australia, at a government facility just outside Bangkok, Thailand. 
The illegal trade in this species has grown exponentially in recent years, with Traffic’s new report estimating 1.5 to 2 million eggs being illegally collected annually. Without further protection and enforcement of current laws these captivating creatures could be in trouble.

turtleconservancy:

A young Pig-Nosed Turtle (Carettochelys insculpta), from New Guinea and Australia, at a government facility just outside Bangkok, Thailand.

The illegal trade in this species has grown exponentially in recent years, with Traffics new report estimating 1.5 to 2 million eggs being illegally collected annually. Without further protection and enforcement of current laws these captivating creatures could be in trouble.

Study links Greenland ice sheet collapse, sea level rise 400,000 years ago

A study, published last June - 2014, suggests that a warming period more than 400,000 years ago pushed the Greenland ice sheet past its stability threshold, resulting in a nearly complete deglaciation of southern Greenland and raising global sea levels some 4-6 meters.

The study is one of the first to zero in on how the vast Greenland ice sheet responded to warmer temperatures during that period, which were caused by changes in the Earth’s orbit around the sun. Pictured here, a research team is hiking to sample the Greenland ice-sheet margin in south Greenland…

(read more: Oregon State University)

Image credit: Kelsey Winsor, courtesy OSU
Study links Greenland ice sheet collapse, sea level rise 400,000 years ago
A study, published last June - 2014, suggests that a warming period more than 400,000 years ago pushed the Greenland ice sheet past its stability threshold, resulting in a nearly complete deglaciation of southern Greenland and raising global sea levels some 4-6 meters.
The study is one of the first to zero in on how the vast Greenland ice sheet responded to warmer temperatures during that period, which were caused by changes in the Earth’s orbit around the sun.
Pictured here, a research team is hiking to sample the Greenland ice-sheet margin in south Greenland…
(read more: Oregon State University)
Image credit: Kelsey Winsor, courtesy OSU

Texas Parks:  Horned Lizards on the Move

Texas horned lizards have disappeared across much of their historic range, but biologists at the Muse Wildlife Management Area are investigating what it might take to bring them back.

Their research is partly funded by sales of Texas horned lizard conservation license plates:  http://conservationplate.org/

(via: Texas Parks and Wildlife)

Consensus: 97% of climate scientists agree
Ninety-seven percent of climate scientists agree that climate-warming trends over the past century are very likely due to human activities (1), and most of the leading scientific organizations worldwide have issued public statements endorsing this position. The following is a partial list of these organizations, along with links to their published statements and a selection of related resources.
For a list of 18 American agencies making statements on this…
(read more: NASA - Global Climate Science)
image: Temperature data from four international science institutions. All show rapid warming in the past few decades and that the last decade has been the warmest on record.

Consensus: 97% of climate scientists agree

Ninety-seven percent of climate scientists agree that climate-warming trends over the past century are very likely due to human activities (1), and most of the leading scientific organizations worldwide have issued public statements endorsing this position. The following is a partial list of these organizations, along with links to their published statements and a selection of related resources.

For a list of 18 American agencies making statements on this…

(read more: NASA - Global Climate Science)

image: Temperature data from four international science institutions. All show rapid warming in the past few decades and that the last decade has been the warmest on record.

libutron
libutron:

Condoto Stubfoot Toad - Atelopus spurrelli
This beautiful patterned amphibian is a toad scientifically named Atelopus spurrelli (Bufonidae), a Vulnerable species endemic to the Colombian pacific lowlands in Valle de Cauca, Risaralda and Choco Departments.
This toad is normally having a green or yellow color with black spots on a black base on the back. It seems like the color can vary within the same population between green and more yellow. Ventrally is normally yellow with black spots. The palms and soles are orange.
This is another of several amphibian species whose populations are being affected by Chytridiomycosis.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Juan Carlos Gutiérrez Mejía | Locality: Bahía Solano, Choco, Colombia (2013)

libutron:

Condoto Stubfoot Toad - Atelopus spurrelli

This beautiful patterned amphibian is a toad scientifically named Atelopus spurrelli (Bufonidae), a Vulnerable species endemic to the Colombian pacific lowlands in Valle de Cauca, Risaralda and Choco Departments.

This toad is normally having a green or yellow color with black spots on a black base on the back. It seems like the color can vary within the same population between green and more yellow. Ventrally is normally yellow with black spots. The palms and soles are orange.

This is another of several amphibian species whose populations are being affected by Chytridiomycosis.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Juan Carlos Gutiérrez Mejía | Locality: Bahía Solano, Choco, Colombia (2013)

The Man Who Saves Cranes

At forty years and counting, celebrated ornithologist George Archibald’s global crusade to protect cranes still has the wind beneath its wings.

by Rene Ebersole

It was the spring of 1976, and Tex the whooping crane was confused. She thought she was human. Which was no surprise, since she had been hanging out with humans since the time she hatched at the San Antonio Zoo.

In science speak, Tex had “imprinted,” a perfectly normal behavior common among birds when they are reared by people. Trouble was, Tex’s mix-up was getting in the way of important science.Whooping cranes were in dire trouble.

The remaining population was well below 100 birds. Tex’s genes could play an important role maintaining some genetic diversity in the increasingly small whooping crane population, if she would breed in captivity…

(read more: Audubon Magazine)

Mountain Chicken Frogs Offspring Return to Caribbean Home
Dozens of frogs reared in UK zoos to escape the deadly chytrid fungus returned to Montserrat
by Adam Vaughan
Dozens of frogs reared in UK zoos have been returned to their Caribbean home in a painstaking operation, five years after their parents were airflifted out to escape a deadly fungus.
A total of 51 Leptodactylus fallax, known as “mountain chicken frogs” because they reportedly taste like chicken and make a clucking-like noise, were released on the Jersey-sized island of Montserrat, a British Overseas Territory.
In 2009, conservationists rescued a population of the critically endangered frogs from the island to avoid them being wiped out by a chytrid fungus which has devastated amphibian numbers worldwide. The mountain chicken frog population has also dwindled due to people eating them – the species is the national dish in nearby Dominica…
(read more: The Guardian UK)
photograph: Gerardo Garcia/Chester Zoo/PA

Mountain Chicken Frogs Offspring Return to Caribbean Home

Dozens of frogs reared in UK zoos to escape the deadly chytrid fungus returned to Montserrat

by Adam Vaughan

Dozens of frogs reared in UK zoos have been returned to their Caribbean home in a painstaking operation, five years after their parents were airflifted out to escape a deadly fungus.

A total of 51 Leptodactylus fallax, known as “mountain chicken frogs” because they reportedly taste like chicken and make a clucking-like noise, were released on the Jersey-sized island of Montserrat, a British Overseas Territory.

In 2009, conservationists rescued a population of the critically endangered frogs from the island to avoid them being wiped out by a chytrid fungus which has devastated amphibian numbers worldwide. The mountain chicken frog population has also dwindled due to people eating them – the species is the national dish in nearby Dominica…

(read more: The Guardian UK)

photograph: Gerardo Garcia/Chester Zoo/PA

Feds propose placing ‘threatened’ tag on snake found only in Alabama and  Mississippi

by Brendan Kirby

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service has proposed adding a non-venomous snake found only in a handful of Alabama and Mississippi counties to its list of “threatened” species, and has invited public comment.

According to the federal agency, the black pinesnake (Pituophis melanoleucus lodingi) is found only in Mobile, Washington and Clarke counties in Alabama, and 11 Mississippi counties, including Jackson and George. It has not been seen in Louisiana in more than 30 years.

If deemed threatened under the Endangered Species Act, the government would impose certain restrictions on activities like the use of herbicides, controlled burns and some timber activities in the affected habitat areas…

(read more: Alabama.com)

photos: The Nature Conservancy and John Sullivan

mypubliclands

mypubliclands:

A Cariboon for Caribou

There are a great many things that set Alaska apart from the lower 48.

Chief among them are the unique challenges the environment offers, the diversity of animals that inhabit it, and the sheer size of America’s largest state. These diverse lands include majestic mountain ranges, vibrant wetlands, unique coastal marine environments and vast expanses of tundra. The BLM manages 72 million acres of public lands in the state, including the largest contiguous block of federal land in the United States - the 23 million acre National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska.

All of these factors come into play as the BLM in Alaska manages habitat for 16 herds of barren-ground caribou.

CLICK HERE to read A Cariboon for Caribou - a feature article by Erin Curtis in the BLM’s My Public Lands Magazine, Summer 2014