dendroica

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Umbrella Crab" (Cryptolithodes sitchensis)

Also known as the Sitka crab or the Turtle Crab, the umbrella crab is a species of lithodid crab that is native to coastal regions of the northeastern Pacific, ranging from Sitka, Alaska to Point Loma, California. C. sitchensis is noted for having a unusual half-moon shaped carapace that extends over its walking legs and chelipeds, this serves as a form of camouflage allowing C. sitchensis to blend in with the rocks around it.  The color of C. sitchensis’s carapace is highly variable and often matches the color of the coralline algae with C. sitchensis feeds on.

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Crustacea-Malacostraca-Decapoda-Anomura-Lithodidae-Cryptolithodes-C. sitchensis

Image(s): Kueda

The light-blue soldier crab, Mictyris longicarpus, inhabits sandy beaches from Singapore and the Bay of Bengal to New Caledonia and Australia. These crabs spend much of their time buried in the sand but emerge to the surface during low tide. They are famous for traveling across the beach in large “armies.” Read more: http://eol.org/pages/4270726 Image by LiquidGhoul via Wikimedia Common
(via: Encyclopedia of Life)

The light-blue soldier crab, Mictyris longicarpus, inhabits sandy beaches from Singapore and the Bay of Bengal to New Caledonia and Australia. These crabs spend much of their time buried in the sand but emerge to the surface during low tide. They are famous for traveling across the beach in large “armies.”

 Read more: http://eol.org/pages/4270726

Image by LiquidGhoul via Wikimedia Common

(via: Encyclopedia of Life)

NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research
 Did you know that NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer is America’s first and only federally funded ship dedicated to ocean exploration and discovery?
The ship is equipped with telepresence technology that allows scientists to participate in expeditions without ever leaving the (dry) comfort of their own labs. This means that the number of scientists who can provide input and conduct “at-sea” research isn’t limited by the space available on the ship. We received input from more than 40 scientists in planning the 2013 Gulf expedition, and we expect that these scientists and many others will participate at some point over the course of the expedition. And of course, the same technology that allows scientists to participate virtually also means that YOU can tune in and follow the action, so get ready… 13 days until the expedition starts!About the image:  Spider Crab seen while exploring near the Sigsbee Escarpment in the Gulf of Mexico in 2012. 

*We’ll be heading back to the escarpment again this year and while every adventure is different, for a taste of what we saw last time, check out this highlights video: 

http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1202/logs/dailyupdates/media/movies/highlights0424_video.html

 Did you know that NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer is America’s first and only federally funded ship dedicated to ocean exploration and discovery?

The ship is equipped with telepresence technology that allows scientists to participate in expeditions without ever leaving the (dry) comfort of their own labs. This means that the number of scientists who can provide input and conduct “at-sea” research isn’t limited by the space available on the ship. We received input from more than 40 scientists in planning the 2013 Gulf expedition, and we expect that these scientists and many others will participate at some point over the course of the expedition.

And of course, the same technology that allows scientists to participate virtually also means that YOU can tune in and follow the action, so get ready… 13 days until the expedition starts!

About the image:  Spider Crab seen while exploring near the Sigsbee Escarpment in the Gulf of Mexico in 2012.
*We’ll be heading back to the escarpment again this year and while every adventure is different, for a taste of what we saw last time, check out this highlights video:
Calico Box Crab
If you go diving in the western Atlantic Ocean from the Chesapeake Bay to the Dominican Republic, you may run into this gorgeous crab, the Calico Box Crab, Hepatus epheliticus. It lives in shallow water at depths of up to 46 metres (151 ft) on sandy and muddy substrates. It often carries the sea anemone Calliactis tricolor on its back, or lies buried in the sand, with only its eyes exposed. More about this species: Encyclopedia of LifeImage by Katie Ahlfeld via Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Invertebrate Zoology 

Calico Box Crab

If you go diving in the western Atlantic Ocean from the Chesapeake Bay to the Dominican Republic, you may run into this gorgeous crab, the Calico Box Crab, Hepatus epheliticus. It lives in shallow water at depths of up to 46 metres (151 ft) on sandy and muddy substrates. It often carries the sea anemone Calliactis tricolor on its back, or lies buried in the sand, with only its eyes exposed.

More about this species: Encyclopedia of Life

Image by Katie Ahlfeld via Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Invertebrate Zoology 

libutron
libutron:

Purple Mangrove Crab (Ucides cordatus) - Brazil | ©Pedro Bernardo
Endemic from Florida (US) to the South Brazilian coast, Ucides cordatus exhibits territorial behaviur, living in individual burrows up to 2 m deep. 
This crab plays a very important ecological role in mangrove areas, because its burrow activity is essential for soil drainage and aeration, and nutrient exchange between water and sediments.
U. cordatus is considered a keystone species of neotropical mangrove forest, and also it represents in Brazil  a valuable fishery resource, exploited by local fishermen, both for their subsistence and also as a cash income source.
[Source]

libutron:

Purple Mangrove Crab (Ucides cordatus) - Brazil | ©Pedro Bernardo

Endemic from Florida (US) to the South Brazilian coast, Ucides cordatus exhibits territorial behaviur, living in individual burrows up to 2 m deep. 

This crab plays a very important ecological role in mangrove areas, because its burrow activity is essential for soil drainage and aeration, and nutrient exchange between water and sediments.

U. cordatus is considered a keystone species of neotropical mangrove forest, and also it represents in Brazil  a valuable fishery resource, exploited by local fishermen, both for their subsistence and also as a cash income source.

[Source]

mucholderthen
mucholderthen:

Lybia edmondsoni: THE FABULOUS POM-POM CRAB Posted by Matthew Cobb at Why Evolution Is True 

Lybia is a genus of small crabs in the family Xanthidae.  Their common names include boxer crabs, boxing crabs and pom-pom crabs.
They are notable for their mutualism with sea anemones, which they hold in their claws for defense. In return, the anemones get carried around which may enable them to capture more food particles with their tentacles. [Wikipedia]

PHYLOGENYAnimalia  >  Arthropoda  >  Crustacea  >  Malacostraca  >  Decapoda  >Brachyura  >  Xanthidae  >  Lybia
And this looks like Lybia edmondsoni Takeda & Miyake, 1970

mucholderthen:

Lybia edmondsoni: THE FABULOUS POM-POM CRAB 
Posted by Matthew Cobb at Why Evolution Is True 

Lybia is a genus of small crabs in the family Xanthidae.  Their common names include boxer crabs, boxing crabs and pom-pom crabs.

They are notable for their mutualism with sea anemones, which they hold in their claws for defense. In return, the anemones get carried around which may enable them to capture more food particles with their tentacles. [Wikipedia]

PHYLOGENY
Animalia  >  Arthropoda  >  Crustacea  >  Malacostraca  >  Decapoda  >
Brachyura  >  Xanthidae  >  Lybia

And this looks like Lybia edmondsoni Takeda & Miyake, 1970

theatlantic

theatlantic:

What the World Looks Like (When You’re a Crab Net)

This is how one marine explorer summed up the ecosystem that has established itself below the ocean’s surface: “Darling, it’s better down where it’s wetter, take it from me.”

We have generally taken his word for it.

Thanks to an enterprising videographer, though, we can test Sebastian’s claim for ourselves. In late December, Scott Murray had a crazy idea: to attach a GoPro camera to a crab net—and see, vicariously, what the net saw. And what the net saw is pretty amazing: crabs, clawing over food. Rays. Fish, in glittering schools. A FREAKING DOLPHIN.

Read more.

astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

Mangrove Tree Crab (Aratus pisonii)

…a species of semi-terrestrial Sesarmid crab which inhabits mangrove trees in tropical and subtropical parts of the Americas, ranging from Florida to Brazil and Nicaragua to Peru. A. pisonii typically inhabits red mangroves (Rhizophora mangle) but is known to inhabit white and black mangroves as well, it will ascend to these trees when the tide rises and descend to the mud when the tide goes down. 

Mangrove tree crabs feed mostly on the leaves of the mangrove trees they inhabit. However, they are omnivores and will prefer animal matter if possible, typically feeding on small invertebrates and carrion.

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Crustacea-Malacostraca-Decapoda-Brachyura-Sesarmidae-Aratus-A. pisonii

Images: Fabio Mandredini and kaeagles

More Creatures Discovered in the Deep Sea of the Antarctic

by Liz Langley

A sea snail feeding off a dead octopus’ beak is among the 30 new species found during an expedition to Antarctica‘s Amundsen Sea (map), according to the first study to shed light on the sea’s bottom dwellers.

The newfound sea snail, or limpet, is from a group that specializes in feeding on the decaying beaks of squid, octopi, and their relatives, according to study leader Katrin Linse of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS).

Linse and a team of marine biologists from BAS and other institutions hauled up 5,469 specimens belonging to 275 species from the depths of the little-explored sea of the Southern Ocean during a 2008 research cruise.

That year, scientists on the RSS James Clark Ross took advantage of the thin summer ice to get close to the edge of the ice shelf and bring up the thousands of specimens, including some newly discovered in Antarctic waters. At least 10 percent of all the species collected are new to science, and the figure is likely to rise, Linse said.

It’s taken a global team years to identify and categorize only a small fraction of the species, which are described October 1 in the journal Continental Shelf Research

(read more: National Geo)

photos by British Antarctic Survey - A young king crab, Neolithodes yaldwyni, Common Heart Urchin, Antarctic octopus, Pareledone turqueti, Bristle Cage Worm

2013 National Geographic Photo Contest Winners:
(Nature category) -   A hermit crab (Pagurus anachoretus) on a calcareous tube of a feather duster worm (Sabella spallanzani), a marine annelid worm. It is easier for the crab to collect its food here, which is transported by the current. It’s very difficult to approach the worm without it closing quickly. 
Photo by Lorenzo Terraneom
(via: the Boston Globe)

2013 National Geographic Photo Contest Winners:

(Nature category) -   A hermit crab (Pagurus anachoretus) on a calcareous tube of a feather duster worm (Sabella spallanzani), a marine annelid worm. It is easier for the crab to collect its food here, which is transported by the current. It’s very difficult to approach the worm without it closing quickly.

Photo by Lorenzo Terraneom

(via: the Boston Globe)