mypubliclands
mypubliclands:

Show Some Condor Love! Follow Our California Condor Release for National Public Lands Day
Today, the BLM, The Peregrine Fund and partners will release three California condors in the BLM-managed Vermillion Cliffs National Monument in Arizona. The annual release coincides with National Public Lands Day, and you can join the celebration on social media!  
Follow using the hashtags #CondorsOnTheRise, #WelcomeCondors and #NPLD on BLM’s Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. 
Photo by #CondorsOnTheRise Partner Arizona Game and Fish.  See more photos on our My Public Lands Flickr set,
Learn more about the annual event and condor recovery: http://bit.ly/condorsontherise

mypubliclands:

Show Some Condor Love! Follow Our California Condor Release for National Public Lands Day

Today, the BLM, The Peregrine Fund and partners will release three California condors in the BLM-managed Vermillion Cliffs National Monument in Arizona. The annual release coincides with National Public Lands Day, and you can join the celebration on social media!  

Follow using the hashtags #CondorsOnTheRise, #WelcomeCondors and #NPLD on BLM’s Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. 

Photo by #CondorsOnTheRise Partner Arizona Game and Fish.  See more photos on our My Public Lands Flickr set,

Learn more about the annual event and condor recovery: http://bit.ly/condorsontherise

What an amazing find! 
A female Sundarbans River Terrapin (Batagur baska) was discovered in a family pond in Bangladesh. The turtle had been kept as a pet for 16 years. After much discussion, the turtle’s owner agreed to sell the critically endangered turtle to the team’s breeding colony, adding a seventh female and diversifying the genetic base! In this touching photo, the previous owner says good-bye to her beloved pet.
You can read more about this exceptional story here:
Turtle Survival Alliance

What an amazing find!

A female Sundarbans River Terrapin (Batagur baska) was discovered in a family pond in Bangladesh. The turtle had been kept as a pet for 16 years. After much discussion, the turtle’s owner agreed to sell the critically endangered turtle to the team’s breeding colony, adding a seventh female and diversifying the genetic base! In this touching photo, the previous owner says good-bye to her beloved pet.

You can read more about this exceptional story here:

Turtle Survival Alliance

Whooping Crane Conservation News:
Four endangered whooping crane chicks raised in captivity began their integration into the wild Saturday as part of the continuing effort to increase the wild population of this species. The cranes, hatched and raised by their parents at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, Maryland, were released on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in Wisconsin. At one point in the past, researchers believe the Whooping crane population dropped to fewer than two-dozen birds. Today the population is estimated to be approximately 425 in the wild, with another 125 in captivity. If you’d like to read more about the chicks’ release, follow this link: 
Whooping Crane ReleasePhoto by: Kara Zwickey, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
(via: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS))

Whooping Crane Conservation News:

Four endangered whooping crane chicks raised in captivity began their integration into the wild Saturday as part of the continuing effort to increase the wild population of this species.

The cranes, hatched and raised by their parents at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, Maryland, were released on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in Wisconsin.

At one point in the past, researchers believe the Whooping crane population dropped to fewer than two-dozen birds. Today the population is estimated to be approximately 425 in the wild, with another 125 in captivity.

If you’d like to read more about the chicks’ release, follow this link:

Whooping Crane Release

Photo by: Kara Zwickey, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

(via: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS))

What Can Humans Do to Save the Pacific Northwest’s Iconic Salmon?
The fish is facing an upstream struggle to survive. Can human ingenuity find a solution?
by Priscilla Long
Wild Pacific salmon are delicious to eat. But they mean more than a “tasty morsel.” Wild salmon and steelhead are iconic of wildlife, of indigenous Northwest lifestyles, of the streams they spawn in, of the ocean they spend half their lives in. Wild Pacific salmon stand for the Pacific Northwest.

They also stand for our present ecological emergency, what scientists term the Sixth Great Extinction, caused by global warming, invasive species and habitat degradation.

In the Pacific Northwest, 19 populations of wild salmon and steelhead are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. On the Skagit River these include chinook and steelhead. These are, of course, extant runs. Salmon have already gone extinct in 40 percent of their historical range…

(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)
photo: Chinook Salmon, by Elaine Thompson/AP Images

What Can Humans Do to Save the Pacific Northwest’s Iconic Salmon?

The fish is facing an upstream struggle to survive. Can human ingenuity find a solution?

by Priscilla Long

Wild Pacific salmon are delicious to eat. But they mean more than a “tasty morsel.” Wild salmon and steelhead are iconic of wildlife, of indigenous Northwest lifestyles, of the streams they spawn in, of the ocean they spend half their lives in. Wild Pacific salmon stand for the Pacific Northwest.
They also stand for our present ecological emergency, what scientists term the Sixth Great Extinction, caused by global warming, invasive species and habitat degradation.
In the Pacific Northwest, 19 populations of wild salmon and steelhead are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. On the Skagit River these include chinook and steelhead. These are, of course, extant runs. Salmon have already gone extinct in 40 percent of their historical range…

(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)

photo: Chinook Salmon, by Elaine Thompson/AP Images

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Chinese Pond Turtle
 The Chinese Pond Turtle (Mauremys reevesii) can be found in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and Korea. This species prefers slow moving aquatic habitats where it feeds on a variety of food. Its omnivorous diet consists of insect larvae, invertebrates, fish, carrion, algae and other aquatic plants. The Chinese Pond Turtle, also known as Reeves’ Turtle is endangered in the wild and is found in large numbers in farms in China where they are bred for the pet and food markets.
(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Chinese Pond Turtle

The Chinese Pond Turtle (Mauremys reevesii) can be found in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and Korea. This species prefers slow moving aquatic habitats where it feeds on a variety of food. Its omnivorous diet consists of insect larvae, invertebrates, fish, carrion, algae and other aquatic plants. The Chinese Pond Turtle, also known as Reeves’ Turtle is endangered in the wild and is found in large numbers in farms in China where they are bred for the pet and food markets.

(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Black Softshell Turtle 
The Black Softshell Turtle (Nilssonia nigricans) from Northeastern India and Bangladesh is a large species with a shell length that can reach 3 feet. Their coloration varies greatly with age. They are quite colorful as hatchlings and juveniles, but become a more uniform darker color as adults. 
They can be found in clear, slow moving rivers where they eat fish, shellfish and carrion. For many years this species was thought to only remain in a single artificial pond at a temple in Bangladesh (and was once though extinct in the wild). However, in recent years it has been confirmed in the wild at a few other localities. TSA is committed to increasing the population of this rare species through careful management and this year we are pleased to report that 44 turtles have hatched! 
Read more here: Turtle Survival Alliance

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Black Softshell Turtle

The Black Softshell Turtle (Nilssonia nigricans) from Northeastern India and Bangladesh is a large species with a shell length that can reach 3 feet. Their coloration varies greatly with age. They are quite colorful as hatchlings and juveniles, but become a more uniform darker color as adults.

They can be found in clear, slow moving rivers where they eat fish, shellfish and carrion. For many years this species was thought to only remain in a single artificial pond at a temple in Bangladesh (and was once though extinct in the wild). However, in recent years it has been confirmed in the wild at a few other localities. TSA is committed to increasing the population of this rare species through careful management and this year we are pleased to report that 44 turtles have hatched!

Read more here: Turtle Survival Alliance

libutron
libutron:

Bushmanland Tent Tortoise - Psammobates tentorius verroxii
Tent tortoises are amazing creatures with beautiful geometric patterns in the domed carapace that resembles bedouin tents. Among them, Psammobates tentorius verroxii (Testudinidae), with up to 145 mm in length, comes in a bewildering range of shapes and colors.
The Bushmanland Tent Tortoise often has the carapace uniformly russet or dark brown, but usually patterned with darker brown rays. The “Knoppies” (tents or raised scutes) are rarely developed, the shell is low, smooth and rounded.
This subspecies occurs and is widespread in South Africa and Namibia, however it remains among the most poorly known of the subcontinent’s tortoises.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©cowyeow | Locality: Near Jagersberg, South Africa (2007)

libutron:

Bushmanland Tent Tortoise - Psammobates tentorius verroxii

Tent tortoises are amazing creatures with beautiful geometric patterns in the domed carapace that resembles bedouin tents. Among them, Psammobates tentorius verroxii (Testudinidae), with up to 145 mm in length, comes in a bewildering range of shapes and colors.

The Bushmanland Tent Tortoise often has the carapace uniformly russet or dark brown, but usually patterned with darker brown rays. The “Knoppies” (tents or raised scutes) are rarely developed, the shell is low, smooth and rounded.

This subspecies occurs and is widespread in South Africa and Namibia, however it remains among the most poorly known of the subcontinent’s tortoises.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©cowyeow | Locality: Near Jagersberg, South Africa (2007)

GOOD NEWS FROM ARIZONA:
Video captures rare glimpse of jaguars mating
You may remember two years ago, we featured video footage from the Northern Jaguar Reserve of two romantically inclined jaguars walking together through an arroyo. Then last year, our cameras captured images of their six-month-old cub heading confidently into the night.
Now, much more exciting, we have retrieved an extremely rare and candid video of two jaguars mating on the reserve. While it is not National Geographic quality, and it is only a 25-second clip, we are amazed that our camera was in just the right place at that moment.
The male and female jaguar were both new to our cameras at the time, and their cub should be starting to wander around the reserve this fall.
View the mating video and other jaguar footage online here.
Video still of “Caliente” and “Seda” on the Northern Jaguar Reserve.
(via: Northern Jaguar Project)

GOOD NEWS FROM ARIZONA:

Video captures rare glimpse of jaguars mating

You may remember two years ago, we featured video footage from the Northern Jaguar Reserve of two romantically inclined jaguars walking together through an arroyo. Then last year, our cameras captured images of their six-month-old cub heading confidently into the night.

Now, much more exciting, we have retrieved an extremely rare and candid video of two jaguars mating on the reserve. While it is not National Geographic quality, and it is only a 25-second clip, we are amazed that our camera was in just the right place at that moment.

The male and female jaguar were both new to our cameras at the time, and their cub should be starting to wander around the reserve this fall.

View the mating video and other jaguar footage online here.

Video still of “Caliente” and “Seda” on the Northern Jaguar Reserve.

(via: Northern Jaguar Project)

cool-critters

cool-critters:

Spiny turtle (Heosemys spinosa)

The spiny turtle is known from Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. Sadly this species is highly endangered!

It inhabits lowland and hill rainforest, usually in the vicinity of small streams, mainly in hill areas up to 900 m above sea level.

Mating behaviour appears to be triggered by rain; in captivity, spraying males with water results in them chasing females and attempting to mount. Nothing is known of nesting behaviour in the wild.

photo credits: zooborns, myviadventures

In Search of Lost Salamanders:

Returning after 38 years to find lost salamanders in the remote cloud forests of Guatemala.

by Robin Moore

“We called it the golden wonder”, says Jeremy Jackson, reminiscing about a salamander that he was the first, and last, to find in the wild 38 years ago.

Time has not dulled his memory: I found the first one under a sheet of bark in a field and, after collecting in this field for weeks without success it was obviously something unusual. What the few photos of Bolitoglossa jacksoni [aka Jackson’s Climbing Salamander] that exist don’t show is the brilliance and depth of the coloration. It was an exceptionally beautiful animal”.

But what brought Jackson to the remote forests of Guatemala all those years ago? His good friend, Paul Elias. Elias had ventured to Guatemala for the first time in 1974 – his findings had been so remarkable that he was compelled to return…

(read more: Medium.com)

photographs by Robin Moore

libutron
libutron:

Radiated Tortoise - Astrochelys radiata
Now listed as Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red Lit, Astrochelys radiata (Testudinidae), endemic to the spiny forest of southern Madagascar, had virtually never been studied in the wild until the late 1990s.
Recent research projects and surveys have contributed to defining the extent of the decline of the species, and it now appears that A. radiata faces serious extinction risks unless current trends are halted.
This species is heavily harvested for food and for the pet trade. In wild mature females of this species produce up to three clutches per season with only 1–5 eggs per clutch, leading to an estimated average production of two clutches of four eggs each per breeding female.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Bernard Dupont | Locality: Toliara, Madagascar (2013)

libutron:

Radiated Tortoise - Astrochelys radiata

Now listed as Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red Lit, Astrochelys radiata (Testudinidae), endemic to the spiny forest of southern Madagascar, had virtually never been studied in the wild until the late 1990s.

Recent research projects and surveys have contributed to defining the extent of the decline of the species, and it now appears that A. radiata faces serious extinction risks unless current trends are halted.

This species is heavily harvested for food and for the pet trade. In wild mature females of this species produce up to three clutches per season with only 1–5 eggs per clutch, leading to an estimated average production of two clutches of four eggs each per breeding female.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Bernard Dupont | Locality: Toliara, Madagascar (2013)

Rare Fish Species Found in Australian Outback Bore Drain

by Chrissy Arthur

A thriving population of a small endangered fish has been discovered on a drought-affected outback Queensland cattle station.The Edgbaston goby (Chlamydogobius squamigenus) was only known to live in natural artesian springs on Edgbaston Reserve near Aramac, north-east of Longreach.

But fish have now been discovered in a man-made artesian bore drain 40 km away at the Ravenswood Station at Aramac. Freshwater ecologist Dr Adam Kerezsy stumbled across the rarity when surveying local waters.The fish do not swim very well, so Dr Kerezsy believed they arrived in a flood…

(read more: ABC News - Australia)

photos: Dr. Adam Kerezsy