TSA Turtle Tuesday:  Sulawesi Forest Turtle 
 Little is known about the critically endangered Sulawesi Forest Turtle (Leucocephalon yuwonoi). The species occurs in a very remote region of Indonesia, in the forest of North and Central Sulawesi. 
When spotted in the wild, they can be found along heavily wooded banks and in shallow clear streams. It is believed that their natural diet consists of various insects, leaves and fallen fruit. Because this species is so close to extinction in the wild, the TSA has made the management of a sustainable captive population a top priority. 
Read more about our work with this amazing species…
 (Turtle Survival Alliance) 
photograph credit: Sheena Koeth

TSA Turtle Tuesday:  Sulawesi Forest Turtle

Little is known about the critically endangered Sulawesi Forest Turtle (Leucocephalon yuwonoi). The species occurs in a very remote region of Indonesia, in the forest of North and Central Sulawesi.

When spotted in the wild, they can be found along heavily wooded banks and in shallow clear streams. It is believed that their natural diet consists of various insects, leaves and fallen fruit. Because this species is so close to extinction in the wild, the TSA has made the management of a sustainable captive population a top priority.

Read more about our work with this amazing species…

(Turtle Survival Alliance)

photograph credit: Sheena Koeth

Trouble for Panthers in Florida

Attempts are being made in Florida to place a disposal well for oil and gas waste right next door to the only refuge for Florida’s last 100 panthers AND close to drinking water supplies. This kind of poorly regulated toxic dumping ground would pose a serious threat to both panthers and people.

More here: EPA should protect the endangered Florida panther, not oil and gas profits

* NRDC BioGems Defenders take collective action to protect wildlife and our last wild places. Join us by liking us at www.facebook.com/BioGemsDefenders

State of Idaho plans to poison up to 4,000 Common Ravens. 
Justification: Ravens prey on the eggs of the imperiled Greater Sage-Grouse. Yet of 19 reasons for the grouse’s declining numbers, predation by other wildlife comes in at #12. Providing protected areas and requiring sustainable land management are the most important ways to conserve the grouse, not killing avian predators. 
Join petition by Golden Eagle Audubon Society: Sign the petition here.
(via: American Bird Conservancy)

State of Idaho plans to poison up to 4,000 Common Ravens.

Justification: Ravens prey on the eggs of the imperiled Greater Sage-Grouse. Yet of 19 reasons for the grouse’s declining numbers, predation by other wildlife comes in at #12. Providing protected areas and requiring sustainable land management are the most important ways to conserve the grouse, not killing avian predators.

Join petition by Golden Eagle Audubon Society:

Sign the petition here.

(via: American Bird Conservancy)

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libutron:

A Violet Copper butterfly (male), Lycaena helle (Lycaenidae), from Krähbachtal at Roche Rath, East Belgium.
The Violet Copper is a rare butterfly that is often confined to very small sites, where it may be seen in large numbers. It is found in swampy, wet grassland and rough vegetation bordering streams and lakes. 
Lycaena helle occurs in scattered populations from the north of Norway to the Pyrenees and from the east of Belgium to East Asia. It is a species classified as Endangered on the IUCN Red List.
[Source]
Photo credit: ©Frank Vassen

libutron:

A Violet Copper butterfly (male), Lycaena helle (Lycaenidae), from Krähbachtal at Roche Rath, East Belgium.

The Violet Copper is a rare butterfly that is often confined to very small sites, where it may be seen in large numbers. It is found in swampy, wet grassland and rough vegetation bordering streams and lakes. 

Lycaena helle occurs in scattered populations from the north of Norway to the Pyrenees and from the east of Belgium to East Asia. It is a species classified as Endangered on the IUCN Red List.

[Source]

Photo credit: ©Frank Vassen

Monomoy - A Documentary

Monomoy is a short documentary exploring my experience with the US Fish and Wildlife Service at Monomoy Wildlife Refuge. The film documents Monomoy’s tern colony, considering our complicated relationship with the environment, the complexities of wilderness stewardship, and the contemporary landscape.

See more at: jeremyunderwood.com

* This is a really beautiful and contemplative film about humans and wildlife management.

Protecting the Northern River Terrapin

Our next field report comes from the Bhawal National Park in Bangladesh where the Northern River Terrapin (Batagur baska), one of the rarest turtles in the world, is having another good year!

Five of the six known females in the area have already nested, laying a total of 101 eggs! TSA is hopeful that the sixth female, which was discovered in a local pond and joined the breeding program in October 2013, will also produce eggs. All nests have been moved to a caged protected area on the beach for incubation, and temperatures are being carefully monitored in an effort to produce more females.

As in some other reptile species such as crocodiles, river terrapin sex is determined by environmental temperature after fertilization (Temperature dependent sex determination). Lower temperatures produce male hatchlings while a higher temperature will usually result in females. More females mean more eggs and a brighter future for this critically endangered species…

(read more: Turtle Survival Alliance)

Protecting the Burmese Roof Turtle

Exciting field report from Myanmar where one of the world’s most critically endangered turtles is making a remarkable recovery!

Nesting season is in full swing for the Burmese roof turtle (Batagur trivittata). This species was feared extinct until it was “rediscovered” in 2002 when three individuals were found in a temple pond. Until then, scientists hadn’t seen the Burmese roof turtle since the 1930s.

Now, thanks to the collaborative field efforts of TSA and Wildlife Conservation Society there are 700 turtles thriving under the watchful eye of conservationists in the region. Due to a comprehensive program which includes nest protection, head-starting young turtles for future release and breeding in protected settings, this delicate species has been brought back from the brink.

And this season is turning out to be a bumper crop for nesting. To date, as many as 150 eggs from eight clutches have been recorded! A huge thanks to SOS - Save Our Species for their continued support of our work with this incredible species. Stay tuned for more reports from the field!

(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

Threatened Seabirds Get Some Much Needed Protection
The American Bird Conservancy is proud to be one of the key partners with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that will install the first predator-proof fence on Kauai, similar to the one at Kaena Point on Oahu, Hawaii. Once in place, the fenced enclosure will serve as the home of a new population of the threatened Newell’s Shearwater (Puffinus newelli). 
Photo credit: Brenda Zaun, USFWS read more here: TheGardenIsland

Threatened Seabirds Get Some Much Needed Protection

The American Bird Conservancy is proud to be one of the key partners with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that will install the first predator-proof fence on Kauai, similar to the one at Kaena Point on Oahu, Hawaii. Once in place, the fenced enclosure will serve as the home of a new population of the threatened Newell’s Shearwater (Puffinus newelli).

Photo credit: Brenda Zaun, USFWS

read more here: TheGardenIsland

Bringing Bison and Biodiversity Back to the Prairie
A Montana-based nonprofit is moving to preserve 3.5 million acres of the Great Plains.
by Sarah Kuck
The American Prairie Reserve (APR), a Montana-based nonprofit, is well on its way to preserving 3.5 million acres of the Great Plains. Once complete, the reserve would become a veritable Serengeti for the States, with enough space, conservation biologists say, to restore a fully functional ecosystem and bring back resilient populations of species like bison, bighorn sheep, elk, and wolves.
The organization is working to secure 500,000 acres of private land to connect three million acres of land already in public ownership in northeastern Montana. The Prairie Reserve states that they have already acquired nearly 274,000 acres of land and a quarter of the $500 million needed for land management, purchasing costs, and permanent endowments. Approximately 250 purebred bison currently live on 60,000 acres of the reserve…
(read more: Yes!)
Photo by Ryan O’Hara / Flickr

Bringing Bison and Biodiversity Back to the Prairie

A Montana-based nonprofit is moving to preserve 3.5 million acres of the Great Plains.

by Sarah Kuck

The American Prairie Reserve (APR), a Montana-based nonprofit, is well on its way to preserving 3.5 million acres of the Great Plains. Once complete, the reserve would become a veritable Serengeti for the States, with enough space, conservation biologists say, to restore a fully functional ecosystem and bring back resilient populations of species like bison, bighorn sheep, elk, and wolves.

The organization is working to secure 500,000 acres of private land to connect three million acres of land already in public ownership in northeastern Montana. The Prairie Reserve states that they have already acquired nearly 274,000 acres of land and a quarter of the $500 million needed for land management, purchasing costs, and permanent endowments. Approximately 250 purebred bison currently live on 60,000 acres of the reserve…

(read more: Yes!)

Photo by Ryan O’Hara / Flickr

The Wilderness Act – turning 50 in September
… doesn’t just help clean the water for this alligator at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, GA/FL, which has 354,000 acres of designated wilderness. 
The Wilderness Act helps us all – and gives us a chance to find recreation in places nearly untouched by man. Celebrate the Wilderness Act this year by finding solitude and beauty in wilderness – and maybe getting a chance to see animals like this, in person: 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service - National Wildlife Refuge System 
Photo by John Reed

The Wilderness Act – turning 50 in September

… doesn’t just help clean the water for this alligator at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, GA/FL, which has 354,000 acres of designated wilderness.

The Wilderness Act helps us all – and gives us a chance to find recreation in places nearly untouched by man. Celebrate the Wilderness Act this year by finding solitude and beauty in wilderness – and maybe getting a chance to see animals like this, in person:

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service - National Wildlife Refuge System

Photo by John Reed

Scientists Figure Out How To Count Whales … FROM SPACE!!!

by Jonathan Amos

Scientists have demonstrated a new method for counting whales from space. It uses very high-resolution satellite pictures and image-processing software to automatically detect the great mammals at or near the ocean surface.

A test count, reported in the journal Plos One, was conducted on southern right whales in the Golfo Nuevo on the coast of Argentina. The automated system found about 90% of creatures pinpointed in a manual search of the imagery.

This is a huge improvement on previous attempts at space-borne assessment, and could now revolutionise the way whale populations are estimated. Currently, such work is done through counts conducted from a shore position, from the deck of a ship or from a plane. But these are necessarily narrow in scope.

An automated satellite search could cover a much larger area of ocean and at a fraction of the cost…

(read more: BBC News)