labellum
sonorensis: Euglossine bee in Mexico :3

For Rhamphotheca and Labellum my lovely boys.  A Euglossa I personally attracted with some scent and flowers.  It is the third record for the state of Sonora and 165 kilometers from the closest known specimens in the state, and from that state the closest populations are over 300 kilometers south in that magical phantasmagoric land known as Méjico…..  MUAH!

sonorensis: Euglossine bee in Mexico :3

For Rhamphotheca and Labellum my lovely boys.  A Euglossa I personally attracted with some scent and flowers.  It is the third record for the state of Sonora and 165 kilometers from the closest known specimens in the state, and from that state the closest populations are over 300 kilometers south in that magical phantasmagoric land known as Méjico…..  MUAH!

The Evolution of the Orchid and the Orchid Bee
by Sarah Zielinski

When scientists delve into studies of the co-evolution of plants and their pollinators, they have something of a chicken/egg problem—which evolved first, the plant or its pollinator? Orchids and orchid bees are a classic example of this relationship. The flowers depend on the bees to pollinate them so they can reproduce and, in return, the bees get fragrance compounds they use during courtship displays (rather like cologne to attract the lady bees). And researchers had thought that they co-evolved, each species changing a bit, back and forth, over time.

(male Euglossa sp. at orchid Mormodes buccinator, by Maarten Sepp)
But a new study in Science has found that the relationship isn’t as equal as had been thought. The biologists reconstructed the complex evolutionary history of the plants and their pollinators, figuring out which bees pollinated which orchid species and analyzing the compounds collected by the bees. It seems that the orchids need the bees more than the bees need the flowers—the compounds produced by the orchids are only about 10 percent of the compounds collected by the bees. The bees collect far more of their “cologne” from other sources, such as tree resin, fungi and leaves.

(male Euglossa sp., by Jacob Rus)
And it was the bees that evolved first, the researchers found, at least 12 million years before the orchids. “The bees evolved much earlier and independently, which the orchids appear to have been catching up,”says the study’s lead author, Santiago Ramirez, a post-doc at the University of California at Berkeley. And as the bees evolve new preferences for these chemical compounds, the orchids follow, evolving new compounds to lure back their bee pollinators…
(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)     (image: Euglossa paisa, by S. Ramirez, 2005)

The Evolution of the Orchid and the Orchid Bee

by Sarah Zielinski

When scientists delve into studies of the co-evolution of plants and their pollinators, they have something of a chicken/egg problem—which evolved first, the plant or its pollinator? Orchids and orchid bees are a classic example of this relationship. The flowers depend on the bees to pollinate them so they can reproduce and, in return, the bees get fragrance compounds they use during courtship displays (rather like cologne to attract the lady bees). And researchers had thought that they co-evolved, each species changing a bit, back and forth, over time.

(male Euglossa sp. at orchid Mormodes buccinator, by Maarten Sepp)

But a new study in Science has found that the relationship isn’t as equal as had been thought. The biologists reconstructed the complex evolutionary history of the plants and their pollinators, figuring out which bees pollinated which orchid species and analyzing the compounds collected by the bees. It seems that the orchids need the bees more than the bees need the flowers—the compounds produced by the orchids are only about 10 percent of the compounds collected by the bees. The bees collect far more of their “cologne” from other sources, such as tree resin, fungi and leaves.

(male Euglossa sp., by Jacob Rus)

And it was the bees that evolved first, the researchers found, at least 12 million years before the orchids. “The bees evolved much earlier and independently, which the orchids appear to have been catching up,”says the study’s lead author, Santiago Ramirez, a post-doc at the University of California at Berkeley. And as the bees evolve new preferences for these chemical compounds, the orchids follow, evolving new compounds to lure back their bee pollinators…

(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)     (image: Euglossa paisa, by S. Ramirez, 2005)