Mythical Medicinal Mushroom Found Only in Old Growth Forest
by Kimberly Mok
Fungi are incredible organisms that are vital to the earth’s ecosystems. They assist in the bioremediation of poisoned soils and oceans, and are also a source of food, and even building material for us humans.
Some, like American mycologist and founder of Fungi Perfecti, Paul Stamets, have famously asserted that fungi will save the world — no off-hand statement, coming from a man who has spent his life studying and promoting fungi and the end of “fungi-phobia” worldwide.
Historically, a wide range of mushrooms have been used in medicine, and there may be one mushroom that might hold the key to the future of medicine. For years, Stamets has been on the look-out for the agarikon (Fomitopsis officinalis or Laricifomes officinalis, depending on the tree it grows on), a rare and endangered mushroom that grows only in old-growth conifer forests of North America and Europe…
(read more: TreeHugger)
photograph by Dusty Yao

Mythical Medicinal Mushroom Found Only in Old Growth Forest

by Kimberly Mok

Fungi are incredible organisms that are vital to the earth’s ecosystems. They assist in the bioremediation of poisoned soils and oceans, and are also a source of food, and even building material for us humans.

Some, like American mycologist and founder of Fungi Perfecti, Paul Stamets, have famously asserted that fungi will save the world — no off-hand statement, coming from a man who has spent his life studying and promoting fungi and the end of “fungi-phobia” worldwide.

Historically, a wide range of mushrooms have been used in medicine, and there may be one mushroom that might hold the key to the future of medicine. For years, Stamets has been on the look-out for the agarikon (Fomitopsis officinalis or Laricifomes officinalis, depending on the tree it grows on), a rare and endangered mushroom that grows only in old-growth conifer forests of North America and Europe…

(read more: TreeHugger)

photograph by Dusty Yao

New report reveals scale of declines of UK migratory birds wintering in Africa
by Martin Fowlie
The migration of millions of birds across the face of the planet is one of nature’s greatest annual events. Every spring some species move in one direction, while every autumn those same species move in the opposite one, very often linking continents.
Although these migration patterns are as regular as the seasons, monitoring is revealing that, for some species, fewer birds are making the journey each season as the populations of these birds, including species nesting in the UK, are declining rapidly.
The latest in the annual series of State of the UK’s Birds report includes a migratory birds section, including trends for 29 migrant species which nest in the UK in summer and spend the winter around the Mediterranean, or in Africa south of the Sahara Desert.  For the first time the recent population trends for these migratory species have been combined into an indicator revealing some marked differences between species that winter in different areas…
(read more: Bird Life International)
image: Yellow Wagtail, by Andy Hay/rspb

New report reveals scale of declines of UK migratory birds wintering in Africa

by Martin Fowlie

The migration of millions of birds across the face of the planet is one of nature’s greatest annual events. Every spring some species move in one direction, while every autumn those same species move in the opposite one, very often linking continents.

Although these migration patterns are as regular as the seasons, monitoring is revealing that, for some species, fewer birds are making the journey each season as the populations of these birds, including species nesting in the UK, are declining rapidly.

The latest in the annual series of State of the UK’s Birds report includes a migratory birds section, including trends for 29 migrant species which nest in the UK in summer and spend the winter around the Mediterranean, or in Africa south of the Sahara Desert.  For the first time the recent population trends for these migratory species have been combined into an indicator revealing some marked differences between species that winter in different areas…

(read more: Bird Life International)

image: Yellow Wagtail, by Andy Hay/rspb

American Intruder Lurks In Scottish Streams, Clawed And Hungry
by Ari Shapiro
The story starts in the streams and lakes of the northwestern United States, where North American signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) are a familiar sight. Turn over a rock and you may well encounter one.
But in Scottish streams and lochs, these creatures are intruders.
In the United States, we often hear about invasive Asian carp, zebra mussels or snakehead fish from China that take over American waterways. It’s a two-way street: American species are causing chaos in other parts of the world, too.
(In their native North American ecosystems) They eat aquatic insects and larvae; raccoons and herons, in turn, eat them. The system works. But those same crayfish wreak havoc in Scottish waters like Clyde’s Burn — a stream in Scotland where anglers from all over the world come to fish…
(read more: NPR)

American Intruder Lurks In Scottish Streams, Clawed And Hungry

by Ari Shapiro

The story starts in the streams and lakes of the northwestern United States, where North American signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) are a familiar sight. Turn over a rock and you may well encounter one.

But in Scottish streams and lochs, these creatures are intruders.

In the United States, we often hear about invasive Asian carp, zebra mussels or snakehead fish from China that take over American waterways. It’s a two-way street: American species are causing chaos in other parts of the world, too.

(In their native North American ecosystems) They eat aquatic insects and larvae; raccoons and herons, in turn, eat them. The system works. But those same crayfish wreak havoc in Scottish waters like Clyde’s Burn — a stream in Scotland where anglers from all over the world come to fish…

(read more: NPR)

libutron
libutron:

Fingal’s Cave | ©Darby Sawchuk (Staffa island, Scotland)
Staffa is the stuff of legend, an unspoilt and uninhabited island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland, best known for its magnificent basalt columns and spectacular sea caves.
The most famous of these is Fingal’s Cave, also known as An Uamh Binn (Cave of Melody). It has a unique, cathedral-like structure and its hexagonal columns are similar to those of the Giant’s Causeway in Ireland.
Fingal’s Cave was immortalized by Mendelssohn in his Hebrides Overture, after he visited the island in 1829, and in a famous painting by the artist J M W Turner.
Reference: [1]

libutron:

Fingal’s Cave | ©Darby Sawchuk (Staffa island, Scotland)

Staffa is the stuff of legend, an unspoilt and uninhabited island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland, best known for its magnificent basalt columns and spectacular sea caves.

The most famous of these is Fingal’s Cave, also known as An Uamh Binn (Cave of Melody). It has a unique, cathedral-like structure and its hexagonal columns are similar to those of the Giant’s Causeway in Ireland.

Fingal’s Cave was immortalized by Mendelssohn in his Hebrides Overture, after he visited the island in 1829, and in a famous painting by the artist J M W Turner.

Reference: [1]

libutron
cyan-biologist:

Clathrus ruber, Red cage or Latticed stinkhornP. Micheli ex Pers.,1801
C. ruber is a fungi species distributed in Europe, but is seen in other parts of the world. The fungus begins its final stage in a white “bag” called the volva. When this membrane opens, a red fruiting body is shown. This “mushroom” consists of a sticky cross-section of arms which emit a foul smell.
The round fruiting body with a diameter of 6 cm produces chemicals to attract flies and other insects, in order to disperse the spores. This way to colonize new areas is found in other fungi, but also in a lot of plant-species.
Fungi-Basidiomycota-Agaricomycetes-Phallales-Phallaceae-Clathrus-C. ruber

Photo-credits:Joseba Castillohttps://www.flickr.com/photos/14858529@N02/References:(x)

cyan-biologist:

Clathrus ruber, Red cage or Latticed stinkhorn
P. Micheli ex Pers.,1801

C. ruber is a fungi species distributed in Europe, but is seen in other parts of the world. The fungus begins its final stage in a white “bag” called the volva. When this membrane opens, a red fruiting body is shown. This “mushroom” consists of a sticky cross-section of arms which emit a foul smell.

The round fruiting body with a diameter of 6 cm produces chemicals to attract flies and other insects, in order to disperse the spores. This way to colonize new areas is found in other fungi, but also in a lot of plant-species.

Fungi-Basidiomycota-Agaricomycetes-Phallales-Phallaceae-Clathrus
-C. ruber

Photo-credits:
Joseba Castillo
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14858529@N02/
References:
(x)

cool-critters

cool-critters:

Northern crested newt (Triturus cristatus)

The northern crested newt, is a newt in the family Salamandridae found across Europe and parts of Asia. It is a relatively large species but there is a large difference between males and females. Females can measure up to 16 cm and males,measure 14 cm long. The species is known for strange behaviour some of which can include females eating males as a source of extra protein. This process of cannibalism encourages huge fights between males and aggressive behaviour as they fight not to be eaten by the huge females. Great crested newts normally live on land, but breed in ponds and pools. Breeding is similar to that of other newts.

photo credits: thenorthernecho, Simon colmer, Paul Franklin