noworseforwear
biomorphosis:

Caracal also known as desert lynx, can survive for long periods without water. Their ears are larger than other big cats, allowing them to navigate preys and escape danger better. They are known for their bird-catching abilities and because of their good sense of hearing they can easily detect birds flying, even birds with specially adapted feathers for silent flight like owl. Altogether, with their long legs and big paws they can leap up into the air to successfully catch their prey.

biomorphosis:

Caracal also known as desert lynx, can survive for long periods without water. Their ears are larger than other big cats, allowing them to navigate preys and escape danger better. They are known for their bird-catching abilities and because of their good sense of hearing they can easily detect birds flying, even birds with specially adapted feathers for silent flight like owl. Altogether, with their long legs and big paws they can leap up into the air to successfully catch their prey.

Big Cat Rescue, Tampa, FL:   Will the Bobcat
Will was found by a couple in their back yard. Their home was situated on a large farm located in a rural area of Dade City. An adult Bobcat was recently seen within the area and nearby farmers had reportedly been shooting at it to deter it from their property and their livestock. It is unknown if this Bobcat was any relation to Will, but since this young cub was found abandoned it is likely that the adult was his mother and had now been scared away from her cub or worse yet killed. When Rescuers came for Will, they noticed something out of the ordinary right away. At this age, a young Bobcat should have been all teeth and claws backed up with hissing and growling. Instead he sat still and quite and went limp when he was picked up. Over the next several weeks he was seen by several specialists including a neurologist and an optometrist. Will would slowly walk around a room and run into walls or objects as if he did not see them. Although he has improved, Will still suffers from these symptoms and if his surroundings are altered he will still run into things. This handicap prevents him from being considered a candidate for release. He will have a home here at the sanctuary and is being raised with Anasazi. The two are very close in age and will hopefully bond to one another.
(via: BigCatRescue)

Big Cat Rescue, Tampa, FL:   Will the Bobcat

Will was found by a couple in their back yard. Their home was situated on a large farm located in a rural area of Dade City. An adult Bobcat was recently seen within the area and nearby farmers had reportedly been shooting at it to deter it from their property and their livestock. It is unknown if this Bobcat was any relation to Will, but since this young cub was found abandoned it is likely that the adult was his mother and had now been scared away from her cub or worse yet killed.

When Rescuers came for Will, they noticed something out of the ordinary right away. At this age, a young Bobcat should have been all teeth and claws backed up with hissing and growling. Instead he sat still and quite and went limp when he was picked up. Over the next several weeks he was seen by several specialists including a neurologist and an optometrist. Will would slowly walk around a room and run into walls or objects as if he did not see them.

Although he has improved, Will still suffers from these symptoms and if his surroundings are altered he will still run into things. This handicap prevents him from being considered a candidate for release. He will have a home here at the sanctuary and is being raised with Anasazi. The two are very close in age and will hopefully bond to one another.

(via: BigCatRescue)

Ocelots in the United States
Historically, the Ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) could be found in southeastern Arizona and across most of Texas. Now, the North American population is restricted to southernmost Texas, where only a few dozen individuals remain. 
This primarily tropical species is about twice the size of your pet cat, ranging from 20-40 lbs (9-18 kg) and 27-39 in (68-100 cm) in body length, not including tail. They are solitary and generally nocturnal, hunting small vertebrates such as rodents, rabbits and opossums over ranges as large as 7 sq mi (18 sq km). 
This need for large territories makes them susceptible to habitat fragmentation and loss, and also vulnerable to roadways, especially given their nocturnal habits - in fact, the greatest source of mortality among Texas individuals is being struck by vehicles. Because they typically breed only every other year, and give birth to only a single kitten at a time, high mortality rates result in a declining population. The Texas population is now only about half of what it was 20 years ago.photo: Tom Smylie/US Fish & Wildlife Service; via Wikimedia Commons
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

Ocelots in the United States

Historically, the Ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) could be found in southeastern Arizona and across most of Texas. Now, the North American population is restricted to southernmost Texas, where only a few dozen individuals remain.

This primarily tropical species is about twice the size of your pet cat, ranging from 20-40 lbs (9-18 kg) and 27-39 in (68-100 cm) in body length, not including tail. They are solitary and generally nocturnal, hunting small vertebrates such as rodents, rabbits and opossums over ranges as large as 7 sq mi (18 sq km).

This need for large territories makes them susceptible to habitat fragmentation and loss, and also vulnerable to roadways, especially given their nocturnal habits - in fact, the greatest source of mortality among Texas individuals is being struck by vehicles. Because they typically breed only every other year, and give birth to only a single kitten at a time, high mortality rates result in a declining population. The Texas population is now only about half of what it was 20 years ago.

photo: Tom Smylie/US Fish & Wildlife Service;
via Wikimedia Commons

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

Rare Borneo Bay Cat Captured in Photo
by Tia Ghose
An extremely elusive creature called a bay cat has been photographed in stunning detail in its native Borneo in Southeast Asia.

The new image, which was captured by a photographer working with the wildcat conservation organization Panthera, is one of the first high-resolution images taken of the enigmatic species. Previously, grainy camera-trap images were the main evidence of the cat’s existence.
The bay cat, or Pardofelis badia, is a mysterious little wildcat that lives only on the island of Borneo, which includes the countries of Malaysia, Brunei and Indonesia. The diminutive hunters are smaller than the average house cat and have either ruddy chestnut or grayish coats. Their nocturnal nature and secretive demeanors, combined with a low population density, make sightings of the cats incredibly rare. Almost nothing is known about what they eat or how they reproduce…
(read more: Live Science)
photo: Sebastian Kennerknecht | Panthera

Rare Borneo Bay Cat Captured in Photo

by Tia Ghose

An extremely elusive creature called a bay cat has been photographed in stunning detail in its native Borneo in Southeast Asia.

The new image, which was captured by a photographer working with the wildcat conservation organization Panthera, is one of the first high-resolution images taken of the enigmatic species. Previously, grainy camera-trap images were the main evidence of the cat’s existence.

The bay cat, or Pardofelis badia, is a mysterious little wildcat that lives only on the island of Borneo, which includes the countries of Malaysia, Brunei and Indonesia. The diminutive hunters are smaller than the average house cat and have either ruddy chestnut or grayish coats. Their nocturnal nature and secretive demeanors, combined with a low population density, make sightings of the cats incredibly rare. Almost nothing is known about what they eat or how they reproduce…

(read more: Live Science)

photo: Sebastian Kennerknecht | Panthera

libutron
libutron:

Leopard cat | ©Gaschwald
The Leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) is a small wild cat native to Asia with five recognized subspecies, whose patterns of genetic variation is currently under study.
The leopard cat is a widespread species in Asia, where occurs in a broad spectrum of habitats, from tropical rainforest to temperate broadleaf and, marginally, coniferous forest, as well as shrub forest and successional grasslands.
The species is classified as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List, but it is included on CITES Appendix II; populations in Bangladesh, India and Thailand are included on Appendix I (as Prionailurus bengalensis bengalensis). The species is protected at the national level over part of its range, with hunting prohibited in several countries.
Source

libutron:

Leopard cat | ©Gaschwald

The Leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) is a small wild cat native to Asia with five recognized subspecies, whose patterns of genetic variation is currently under study.

The leopard cat is a widespread species in Asia, where occurs in a broad spectrum of habitats, from tropical rainforest to temperate broadleaf and, marginally, coniferous forest, as well as shrub forest and successional grasslands.

The species is classified as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List, but it is included on CITES Appendix II; populations in Bangladesh, India and Thailand are included on Appendix I (as Prionailurus bengalensis bengalensis). The species is protected at the national level over part of its range, with hunting prohibited in several countries.

Source

Snow Leopards and Other Animals Caught on Camera Trap in Wilds of Uzbekistan

by Jeremy Hance

Scientists knew that snow leopards (Panthera uncia) still survived in the Central Asian country of Uzbekistan, but late last year they captured the first ever photos. Camera traps in the Gissar Nature Reserve took photos of the big cats, along with bear, lynx, ibex, wild boar, and other mammals. The camera trap program was led by biologists Bakhtiyor Aromov and Yelizaveta Protas working with Panthera, WWF’s Central Asia Program, and Uzbekistan’s Biocontrol Agency…

(read more: MongaBay)

photos: ©Y. Protas/Panthera/WWF Central Asia Program/Uzbek Biocontrol Agency/Gissar Nature Reserve.

fieldmuseumphotoarchives
fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Fossil Friday, Smilodon.
© The Field Museum, CSGEO39721, Photographer Charles Carpenter.
Composite of fossil vertebrate Smilodon [saber tooth] skeleton in mount shop before installation. For Field Columbian Museum, Hall 35. A little of the background of the mount shop is showing. Geology specimen P12418. Late Pleistocene California Rancho La Brea tar pits.
11x14 glass negative
1917

fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Fossil Friday, Smilodon.

© The Field Museum, CSGEO39721, Photographer Charles Carpenter.

Composite of fossil vertebrate Smilodon [saber tooth] skeleton in mount shop before installation. For Field Columbian Museum, Hall 35. A little of the background of the mount shop is showing. Geology specimen P12418. Late Pleistocene California Rancho La Brea tar pits.

11x14 glass negative

1917

Suave and Debonaire, Meet Ricky the Jaguarundi
by Margaret Badore
Ricky the Jaguarundi lives at Project Survival’s Cat Haven in Dunlap, California. The Jaguarundi, also known as a puma yagouaroundi or eyra cat, is native to Central and South America and is about the size of a house cat. According to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, the cats typically hunt alone or in pairs and prey on reptiles, birds, and small mammals.
photograph by Jennifer Umland
(via: TreeHugger)

Suave and Debonaire, Meet Ricky the Jaguarundi

by Margaret Badore

Ricky the Jaguarundi lives at Project Survival’s Cat Haven in Dunlap, California. The Jaguarundi, also known as a puma yagouaroundi or eyra cat, is native to Central and South America and is about the size of a house cat. According to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, the cats typically hunt alone or in pairs and prey on reptiles, birds, and small mammals.

photograph by Jennifer Umland

(via: TreeHugger)

(FULLEPISODE)

Leopards may be smaller than lions and slower than cheetahs, but it is believed there are roughly ten times more of them than lions, tigers and cheetahs combined. How have they achieved this? The key to their success is their cunning, stealth, and adaptability. From South Africa to Sri Lanka, leopards live secretly, clinging to the shadows.

For agoutis, the night is fraught with peril
by Jordanna Dulaney
The early bird might get the worm, but, as scientists have discovered, the bird is also quite likely to become a cat’s meal. In a study recently published in the online Animal Behavior journal, scientists from the US and the Netherlands have examined the impact of predation patterns on prey’s food foraging habits.
The two-year long study on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, focused on the predator-prey relationship between the Central American agouti (Dasyprocta punctata), a common rainforest rodent, and the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis). Agoutis, which look like long-legged guinea pigs, are a common prey item for the ocelot, a medium-sized cat native to the Neotropics.
"The ocelot-agouti relationship is a beautiful example of a predator-prey interaction," Peter Jansen, a researcher with the study, told mongabay.com. "This example was easy to study on Barro Colorado Island, where both species are relatively common."…
(read more: MongaBay)
photograph by Christian Ziegler

For agoutis, the night is fraught with peril

by Jordanna Dulaney

The early bird might get the worm, but, as scientists have discovered, the bird is also quite likely to become a cat’s meal. In a study recently published in the online Animal Behavior journal, scientists from the US and the Netherlands have examined the impact of predation patterns on prey’s food foraging habits.

The two-year long study on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, focused on the predator-prey relationship between the Central American agouti (Dasyprocta punctata), a common rainforest rodent, and the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis). Agoutis, which look like long-legged guinea pigs, are a common prey item for the ocelot, a medium-sized cat native to the Neotropics.

"The ocelot-agouti relationship is a beautiful example of a predator-prey interaction," Peter Jansen, a researcher with the study, told mongabay.com. "This example was easy to study on Barro Colorado Island, where both species are relatively common."…

(read more: MongaBay)

photograph by Christian Ziegler

scienceyoucanlove
scienceyoucanlove:

Lions are now critically endangered in West Africa. 
Although they once ranged continuously from Senegal to Nigeria, new research has revealed only around 250 adult lions survive in the region, and only one of the four isolated populations contains more than 50 individuals. Read more: http://bit.ly/1d2Nna6
from science alert

scienceyoucanlove:

Lions are now critically endangered in West Africa.

Although they once ranged continuously from Senegal to Nigeria, new research has revealed only around 250 adult lions survive in the region, and only one of the four isolated populations contains more than 50 individuals. 

Read more: http://bit.ly/1d2Nna6

from science alert

Snow Leopards, Uncia uncia, are suspected to have declined by at least 20% over the past two generations (16 years) due to habitat loss, prey base depletion, illegal trade, conflict with local people, and lack of conservation capacity, policy and awareness. More about this species: Encyclopedia of Life Also see: Russian Snow Leopard Near Extinction Image by Bernard Landgraf via Wikimedia Commons 

Snow Leopards, Uncia uncia, are suspected to have declined by at least 20% over the past two generations (16 years) due to habitat loss, prey base depletion, illegal trade, conflict with local people, and lack of conservation capacity, policy and awareness.

More about this species: Encyclopedia of Life

Also see: Russian Snow Leopard Near Extinction

Image by Bernard Landgraf via Wikimedia Commons 

Snow Leopard Cubs a Sign of Hope

New camera trap images are good news for Eastern Russia population

WWF press release

Camera trap images of two snow leopard cubs tussling and tumbling in eastern Russia indicate a potential resurgence of a once-decimated population.

The camera traps—partially financed by WWF—captured the photos in the Argut River Valley, an area nearly 40 snow leopards inhabited two decades ago. A sharp increase in poaching in the 1990s nearly eliminated this population.

In 2011, WWF collaborated with the Altai Project and Snow Leopard Conservancy, among other organizations, to research and restore the Argut River Valley snow leopard population. A crackdown on poaching and an increase in patrol helped boost the number of snow leopards to an estimated five to eight this year.

Researchers believe the cubs in the photos are less than a year old. They indicate snow leopards are breeding…

(read more: World Wildlife Fund)

photos: WWF-Russia