grotesquerie

biomorphosis:

Sand cats (Felis margarita) live in sandy, stony deserts and the only species of cat that survive without water for long period of time (couple of months). Unlike other species of cats, sand cat is poor climber and jumper but proficient digger. It digs burrows in the sand where it hides from the harsh desert sun. 

Paws covered with thick fur protect the cat’s feet from the hot desert sand. These feet cushions also act like snowshoes. They prevent the cat from sinking into the sand and leaving footprints [x].

More leg room, less contact with cars for Ocelots. 
That’s the Rx for ocelots in Texas, says Natl Geo (source). Wildlife highway crossings coming this year may help reduce collisions like the one that killed OM (ocelot male) 276 in November, at Laguna Atascosa Refuge, in south Texas. Finding more space for ocelots to roam will be tougher. The refuge has 12 resident ocelots. 
Photo: US Fish & Wildlife Service
(via: USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System)

More leg room, less contact with cars for Ocelots.

That’s the Rx for ocelots in Texas, says Natl Geo (source). Wildlife highway crossings coming this year may help reduce collisions like the one that killed OM (ocelot male) 276 in November, at Laguna Atascosa Refuge, in south Texas. Finding more space for ocelots to roam will be tougher. The refuge has 12 resident ocelots.

Photo: US Fish & Wildlife Service

(via: USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System)

Black-footed Cat Kittens Born at Philly Zoo
Philadelphia Zoo’s female Black-footed Cat Aza gave birth to a litter of kittens on April 8, 2014: the first Black-footed Cats ever to be born at the Philadelphia Zoo! Their names are Drogon, Rhaegal, and Viserion. Drogon and Viserion are male and Rhaegal is female.

Before making their debut, the kittens underwent a routine wellness check to make sure they’re healthy. In addition to weighing and sexing them, veterinarians completed full physical examinations of each kitten. A keeper is present to monitor them throughout the day to make sure they’re maneuvering through their habitat well, but as you can see in these photos, they are feeling quite at home already…

Learn more and see a video: ZooBorns

USFWS: Monitoring Ocelots in Tamaulipas Mexico

In 2012, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service entered into a binational partnership with the Civil Society for the Conservancy and Development of Natural Areas (CDEN), Friends of Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge, Gladys Porter Zoo, and (in 2013) the San Antonio Zoo. This partnership was formed to locate a large population of ocelots in northern Tamaulipas, Mexico, to assess if it might be able to serve as a potential source for translocation to smaller, at-risk populations such as the ones located in south Texas.

Ocelots are endangered in the Texas mostly due to a loss of their habitat, most of which occurred from the 1930′s to the 1960′s.  Collisions with vehicles also pose a threat.  While both of these issues are being countered with efforts in Texas, the looming threat of a significant loss of their genetic diversity, that occurred over a long period of time, needs to be addressed.  Studies suggested that the most appropriate source for re-establishing the historic genetic diversity of ocelots in Texas would be from the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico, and translocation of wild ocelots has been suggested as an option to achieve this goal…

(read more: Southwest Natural Resources Inventory & Monitoring)

Leopard Loves Men’s Body Spray

Reno the leopard loves men’s body spray and can’t get enough of the smell! We use many different perfumes and sprays to add to enrichment items the cats love to play with and destroy! :)

BIG CAT TV is a close look into our day-to-day operations, the conservation efforts we support, and the 100+ feline residents of “Big Cat Rescue” in Tampa, FL. USA. Big Cat Rescue is an educational non-breeding sanctuary and a registered non-profit 501c3 so your donations are tax deductible!

http://bigcatrescue.org

Zoo Enrichment: Fishing Cat Kitten Learns to Fish

To some animals, ZooEnrichment means testing one’s survival skills. For the fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus) kitten born April 15, it means learning how to fish! A patient mother, Electra watches her kitten as it wades and pounces on some unsuspecting goldfish. This six-week-old kitten just began its lessons. By the time it turns 11-12 weeks, it will be able to fish as well as mom!

(via: Smithsonian’s National Zoo)

It’s the lion of long leap: Amazing moment predator catches an antelope in mid-air 
by Simon Tomlinson
A soaring lion leaps from a ridge to catch a fleeing antelope in mid air.
The extraordinary take-down happened after a pair of lionesses surprised two blesboks running in their direction.
To escape, a frightened blesbok jumped several metres from the ridge - only to be intercepted mid-flight by the hungry female…
(read more/see video: Daily Mail)

It’s the lion of long leap: Amazing moment predator catches an antelope in mid-air 

by Simon Tomlinson

A soaring lion leaps from a ridge to catch a fleeing antelope in mid air.

The extraordinary take-down happened after a pair of lionesses surprised two blesboks running in their direction.

To escape, a frightened blesbok jumped several metres from the ridge - only to be intercepted mid-flight by the hungry female…

(read more/see video: Daily Mail)

New Ocelot Found at Laguna Atascosa NWR, TX
Found at Laguna Atascosa Refuge in Texas, another healthy young ocelot. The April 27 discovery raises the known refuge population of the endangered wildcats to 12. “It’s very exciting,” says refuge wildlife biologist Hilary Swarts, who examined OM290 (ocelot male 290) and tagged him.
Photo: USFWS
(via: USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System)

New Ocelot Found at Laguna Atascosa NWR, TX

Found at Laguna Atascosa Refuge in Texas, another healthy young ocelot. The April 27 discovery raises the known refuge population of the endangered wildcats to 12. “It’s very exciting,” says refuge wildlife biologist Hilary Swarts, who examined OM290 (ocelot male 290) and tagged him.

Photo: USFWS

(via: USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System)

BABY KITTEN REPORT!!!

Palawan Bengal Cats Are First of Berlin Zoo’s Breeding Program

Meet Ilian and Taytay, two Palawan Bengal Cats recently born at Berlin Zoo in Germany! These two kittens, a male and a female, are the first offspring of Berlin Zoo’s breeding program for this Vulnerable subspecies, which is only found on the Philippine island of Palawan…

Learn more: ZooBorns

Trying to explain more about largely unseen bobcats in the Dallas-Fort Worth (TX) area
by Ray Sasser
Derek Broman has a passion for wild carnivores. You can hear it when he talks about bobcats. He studied bobcats in Iowa, Connecticut and New Hampshire for his master’s degree.
In Texas just 15 months, Broman is heading up a Texas Parks and Wildlife Department urban bobcat study in conjunction with Utah State University, the National Wildlife Research Center and the Welder Wildlife Foundation.
The study area covers 49,000 acres of urban and suburban sprawl — parts of Arlington, Hurst and Fort Worth. According to the 2010 census, the study area had 229,674 people and 103,475 housing units. The number of bobcats is yet to be determined.
Bobcats are successful in dwindling habitat because of their secretive, nonconfrontational nature, Broman said. Bobcats are, by far, the most common wild cats in North America, yet few people have ever seen one…
(read more: Dallas Morning News)
image: USDA Wildlife Service

Trying to explain more about largely unseen bobcats in the Dallas-Fort Worth (TX) area

by Ray Sasser

Derek Broman has a passion for wild carnivores. You can hear it when he talks about bobcats. He studied bobcats in Iowa, Connecticut and New Hampshire for his master’s degree.

In Texas just 15 months, Broman is heading up a Texas Parks and Wildlife Department urban bobcat study in conjunction with Utah State University, the National Wildlife Research Center and the Welder Wildlife Foundation.

The study area covers 49,000 acres of urban and suburban sprawl — parts of Arlington, Hurst and Fort Worth. According to the 2010 census, the study area had 229,674 people and 103,475 housing units. The number of bobcats is yet to be determined.

Bobcats are successful in dwindling habitat because of their secretive, nonconfrontational nature, Broman said. Bobcats are, by far, the most common wild cats in North America, yet few people have ever seen one…

(read more: Dallas Morning News)

image: USDA Wildlife Service