astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

Prostheceraeus giesbrechtii

Sometimes known as the Pink Flatworm Prostheceraeus giesbrechtii is a species of euryleptid flatworm that is native to the Mediterranean Sea and the Eastern Atlantic. Like other flatworms P. giesbrechtii likely inhabits reefs and feeds on other invertebrates.

Classification

Animalia-Platyhelminthes-Tubellaria-Polycladida-Cotylea-Euryleptoidea-Euryleptidae-Prostheceraeus-P. giesbrechtii

Image(s): Parent Gery

Pseudobiceros hancockanus
… is a species of hermaphroditic marine flatworm in the family Pseudocerotidae. Pseudobiceros hancockanus lives in warm seas, sometimes on coral reefs, other times among coral fragments or stones, in the Indo-Pacific region.
Like other members of the genus, P. hancockanus is hermaphroditic with each individual able to function as either a male or female. Mating between two such worms involves penis fencing, as each worm tries to inject sperm into the other with one of its two stubby penises, while trying to avoid being inseminated itself. One explanation advanced for this behavior is that the female role entails more investment in the resulting fertilized eggs. 
(via: Wikipedia)
photograph by Jens Petersen

Pseudobiceros hancockanus

… is a species of hermaphroditic marine flatworm in the family Pseudocerotidae. Pseudobiceros hancockanus lives in warm seas, sometimes on coral reefs, other times among coral fragments or stones, in the Indo-Pacific region.

Like other members of the genus, P. hancockanus is hermaphroditic with each individual able to function as either a male or female. Mating between two such worms involves penis fencing, as each worm tries to inject sperm into the other with one of its two stubby penises, while trying to avoid being inseminated itself. One explanation advanced for this behavior is that the female role entails more investment in the resulting fertilized eggs. 

(via: Wikipedia)

photograph by Jens Petersen

You can tell which way a flatworm, like this Pseudobiceros, is facing by locating the pair of pseudotentacles, to the left in this picture. They are formed by simple broad folds of the body margin, but they sure make it look like the critter is looking that way, don’t they? 
Well, it is, actually. A large number of marginal eyes are concentrated in that area. So next time you want to commune with a pretty flatworm, just gaze into its pseudotentacles. More about flatworms: Encyclopedia of LifePhoto: Bernard DUPONT via flickr

You can tell which way a flatworm, like this Pseudobiceros, is facing by locating the pair of pseudotentacles, to the left in this picture. They are formed by simple broad folds of the body margin, but they sure make it look like the critter is looking that way, don’t they?

Well, it is, actually. A large number of marginal eyes are concentrated in that area. So next time you want to commune with a pretty flatworm, just gaze into its pseudotentacles.

More about flatworms: Encyclopedia of Life

Photo: Bernard DUPONT via flickr

astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Diversibipalium rauchi
…is a species of terrestrial planarian that occurs in southeast Asia. Like other terrestrial flatworms this species is a voracious predator and feeds almost exclusively on earthworms, although they are known to take other prey. Once it catches its prey it will feed by extending its pharynx into its body and sucking out its inside.
Classification
Animalia-Platyhelminthes-Rhabditophora-Seriata-Tricladida-Terricola-Bipaliidae-Diversibipalium-D. rauchi
Image: Ellen Tan

astronomy-to-zoology:

Diversibipalium rauchi

…is a species of terrestrial planarian that occurs in southeast Asia. Like other terrestrial flatworms this species is a voracious predator and feeds almost exclusively on earthworms, although they are known to take other prey. Once it catches its prey it will feed by extending its pharynx into its body and sucking out its inside.

Classification

Animalia-Platyhelminthes-Rhabditophora-Seriata-Tricladida-Terricola-Bipaliidae-Diversibipalium-D. rauchi

Image: Ellen Tan

astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

Bipalium simrothi

…is a species of terrestrial flatworm that is native to the Natuna Island chain in Indonesia. Like other members of the genus Bipalium B.simrothi is a predator and feeds almost exclusively on earthworms, but is known to take molluscs as-well. It feeds by extending its pharynx (which is located in the middle of its body) into its prey and sucking out its insides like a drink.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Platyhelminthes-Turbellaria-Tricladida-Contenenticola-Geoplanidae-Bipalium-simrothi

Image Source(s)

Flatworm Discovered Possessing 60 Eyes 
July 2012 - by Mark Brown
A flatworm with 50 to 60 eyes has been  discovered at a nature reserve in Cambridgeshire. The odd little critter is potentially an undescribed species. Brian Eversham, chief executive of the Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire, found the flatworm in the  Shepreth L nature reserve…
(read more: Wired Science)

Flatworm Discovered Possessing 60 Eyes

July 2012 - by Mark Brown

A flatworm with 50 to 60 eyes has been discovered at a nature reserve in Cambridgeshire. The odd little critter is potentially an undescribed species. Brian Eversham, chief executive of the Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire, found the flatworm in the Shepreth L nature reserve

(read more: Wired Science)

hey hey hey

can u ID this for me? <3

image

Paxon:

Of course I can, my little kumquat! This is the Canary Worm (Fletchamia sugdeni or Geoplanaria sugdeni). Its a terrestrial planarian that occurs in NSW, Victoria, and Tasmania.

Platyhelminthes (Phylum) > Rhabditophora (Class) > Seriata (Order) > Tricladida (Suborder) > Terricola (Infraorder) > Geoplanidae (Family) > Caenoplaninae (Subfamily) > Fletchamia (Genus)

astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

Genus Bipalium

(Broadhead planarians)

Also referred to as Hammerhead worms, genus Bipalium is a group of large land flatworms found worldwide and are considered to be an invasive species in many places like the US and Europe. The name Hammerhead or Broadhead comes from the shape of their head region, which looks similar to the head of a hammerhead shark. This genus unlike most planarians is predatory and feeds on “large” invertebrates like earthworms and mollusks. But it feeds the same way as all planarians by extending it’s pharynx out of its mouth (which is located in the middle of its body) and digesting the prey outside of the animal.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Platyhelminethes-Turbellaria-Tricladida-Continenticola-Geoplanidae-Bipalium

Source,Source

ichthyologist

ichthyologist:

Batesian Mimicry in Batfish

Batesian mimicry is a form of mimicry whereby a harmless species copies a dangerous species as a defensive measure.

Juvenile specimens of the Pinnate Batfish (Platax Pinnatus) are known to mimic some flatworms. The fish swims with flowing motions parallel to rocks, similar to the rippling of a flatworm.

Richard Ling and Daniel Kwok on Flickr

Immortal Planarian Worms Defy Aging
by Emma Thorne
Researchers from The University of Nottingham have demonstrated how a species of flatworm overcomes the ageing process to be potentially immortal. Planarian worms have amazed scientists with their apparently limitless ability to regenerate. Researchers have been studying their ability to replace aged or damaged tissues and cells in a bid to understand the mechanisms underlying their longevity.
“Usually when stem cells divide — to heal wounds, or during reproduction or for growth — they start to show signs of ageing. This means that the stem cells are no longer able to divide and so become less able to replace exhausted specialised cells in the tissues of our bodies. Our ageing skin is perhaps the most visible example of this effect. Planarian worms and their stem cells are somehow able to avoid the ageing process and to keep their cells dividing.”One of the events associated with ageing cells is related to telomere length. In order to grow and function normally, cells in our bodies must keep dividing to replace cells that are worn out or damaged. During this division process, copies of the genetic material must pass on to the next generation of cells. The genetic information inside cells is arranged in twisted strands of DNA called chromosomes. At the end of these strands is a protective ‘cap’ called a telomere. Telomeres have been likened to the protective end of a shoelace which stops strands from fraying or sticking to other strands&#8230;
(read more: University of Nottingham)  

Immortal Planarian Worms Defy Aging

by Emma Thorne

Researchers from The University of Nottingham have demonstrated how a species of flatworm overcomes the ageing process to be potentially immortal. Planarian worms have amazed scientists with their apparently limitless ability to regenerate. Researchers have been studying their ability to replace aged or damaged tissues and cells in a bid to understand the mechanisms underlying their longevity.

“Usually when stem cells divide — to heal wounds, or during reproduction or for growth — they start to show signs of ageing. This means that the stem cells are no longer able to divide and so become less able to replace exhausted specialised cells in the tissues of our bodies. Our ageing skin is perhaps the most visible example of this effect. Planarian worms and their stem cells are somehow able to avoid the ageing process and to keep their cells dividing.”

One of the events associated with ageing cells is related to telomere length. In order to grow and function normally, cells in our bodies must keep dividing to replace cells that are worn out or damaged. During this division process, copies of the genetic material must pass on to the next generation of cells. The genetic information inside cells is arranged in twisted strands of DNA called chromosomes. At the end of these strands is a protective ‘cap’ called a telomere. Telomeres have been likened to the protective end of a shoelace which stops strands from fraying or sticking to other strands…

(read more: University of Nottingham)