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Pyxicephalus edulis | ©Tyrone Ping   (False Bay, South Africa)
Known as Edible bullfrog or African bullfrog, Pyxicephalus edulis (Ranidae) is a large, very compact ranid, widespread in Central and East Africa.
In Burkino Faso, P. edulis is one of many frog species that are traded and it is the second most consumed frog species. In Malanville, Benin, it is the third most commonly caught and traded frog. Because villagers are employed to catch and prepare frogs, and because they are an important international trading item,  frogs are an integral part of the economy in areas with large frog populations. Aside from their value as an essential food source, they may also be used for cultural reasons and as traditional medicine in areas where Western medicine is not available. The overexploitation of frogs has lead to villagers observing high decline rates in several species of frog, P. edulis having the highest reported rate among them.
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Pyxicephalus edulis | ©Tyrone Ping   (False Bay, South Africa)

Known as Edible bullfrog or African bullfrog, Pyxicephalus edulis (Ranidae) is a large, very compact ranid, widespread in Central and East Africa.

In Burkino Faso, P. edulis is one of many frog species that are traded and it is the second most consumed frog species. In Malanville, Benin, it is the third most commonly caught and traded frog. Because villagers are employed to catch and prepare frogs, and because they are an important international trading item,  frogs are an integral part of the economy in areas with large frog populations. Aside from their value as an essential food source, they may also be used for cultural reasons and as traditional medicine in areas where Western medicine is not available. The overexploitation of frogs has lead to villagers observing high decline rates in several species of frog, P. edulis having the highest reported rate among them.

[Source]

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Ameerega bilinguis | ©Santiago Ron   (Yasuni National Park, Ecuador)
The Ecuador poison frog, Ameerega bilinguis (Dendrobatidae), is known from the Ecuadorian Amazon Basin in Napo moist forests in the Eastern tropical Altitudinal Zone, and from the department of Putumayo in Colombia [1].
This brightly coloured poison dart frog has a granular red dorsum and a blue and black mottled venter. The degree of mottling and depth of blue color varies from individual to individual. Most Ameerega bilinguis posses a yellow spot at the top of the front and rear legs, again, the size and extent of the spots are variable. The dorsal surfaces of the limbs are dark, whereas the ventral surfaces are a variable shade of blue. There is also a white stripe that runs from the top of the forelimbs, along the top lip towards the snout. Juveniles do not possess the red granular dorsum, it is black. The red color appears steadily as the frog matures to adulthood. A golden canthal stripe may be visible [2].

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Ameerega bilinguis | ©Santiago Ron   (Yasuni National Park, Ecuador)

The Ecuador poison frog, Ameerega bilinguis (Dendrobatidae), is known from the Ecuadorian Amazon Basin in Napo moist forests in the Eastern tropical Altitudinal Zone, and from the department of Putumayo in Colombia [1].

This brightly coloured poison dart frog has a granular red dorsum and a blue and black mottled venter. The degree of mottling and depth of blue color varies from individual to individual. Most Ameerega bilinguis posses a yellow spot at the top of the front and rear legs, again, the size and extent of the spots are variable. The dorsal surfaces of the limbs are dark, whereas the ventral surfaces are a variable shade of blue. There is also a white stripe that runs from the top of the forelimbs, along the top lip towards the snout. Juveniles do not possess the red granular dorsum, it is black. The red color appears steadily as the frog matures to adulthood. A golden canthal stripe may be visible [2].

Shenandoah National Park - VA, USA
 If you’re in a wooded wetland area of Shenandoah National Park and you hear a whole lot of “quacking” going on, chances are that you aren’t hearing ducks.  Wood Frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) are considered “explosive breeders:” virtually all adults in a population show up at the same place at about the same time to play the mating game. The male chorus ~ often heard throughout the day ~ sounds so…rt of like a contentious convention of ducks. 
Wood Frogs place their hopes for the future on vernal pools: temporary ponds that are free of predatory fish. The risk is that the pool may dry up before the eggs hatch or before the tadpoles can metamorphose into air-breathing juvenile frogs. If successful, the new generation of Wood Frogs will leave their natal pond and spend the rest of their lives roaming the forest floor in search of insects and other invertebrates.
They’ll hibernate under leaf litter in winter, when, amazingly, they can undergo freezing and thawing without damage to their tissue, thanks to the production of “antifreeze”-like compounds. In early spring, as soon as the air temperature rises above 50 degrees, the new adult Wood Frogs will head to the nearest vernal pond to start the cycle all over again.
 If you’re in a wooded wetland area of Shenandoah National Park and you hear a whole lot of “quacking” going on, chances are that you aren’t hearing ducks. Wood Frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) are considered “explosive breeders:” virtually all adults in a population show up at the same place at about the same time to play the mating game. The male chorus ~ often heard throughout the day ~ sounds sort of like a contentious convention of ducks.
 
Wood Frogs place their hopes for the future on vernal pools: temporary ponds that are free of predatory fish. The risk is that the pool may dry up before the eggs hatch or before the tadpoles can metamorphose into air-breathing juvenile frogs. If successful, the new generation of Wood Frogs will leave their natal pond and spend the rest of their lives roaming the forest floor in search of insects and other invertebrates.
They’ll hibernate under leaf litter in winter, when, amazingly, they can undergo freezing and thawing without damage to their tissue, thanks to the production of “antifreeze”-like compounds. In early spring, as soon as the air temperature rises above 50 degrees, the new adult Wood Frogs will head to the nearest vernal pond to start the cycle all over again.
New Frog Found in Viet Nam
by Carrie Arnold
High in the remote mountains of Vietnam, scientists have found a “striking” new species of pink-and-yellow frog covered with sharp spikes.
Jodi Rowley, an expert on Southeast Asian amphibians, had never seen a frog with such spiny skin, and neither had her colleagues.
That’s because thorny tree frogs (Gracixalus lumarius), as they’re named in a new study published April 2 in the journal Zootaxa, are found only on Mount Ngoc Linh and surrounding peaks above 5,900 feet (1,800 m).
“Almost every tree hole we looked in had these frogs. They seem to be only from the tops of mountains in this one area in Vietnam, and this region is known to be home to a bunch of species that are found nowhere else,” said Rowley, a biologist at the Australian Museum Research Institute in Sydney. Although her and her colleagues didn’t spot that many tree holes, nearly every one they did find had a frog…
(read more: http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2014/04/03/new-frog-species-vietnam-animals-science-world/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Social&utm_content=link_fb20140406ngnw-frogsp&utm_campaign=Content)
Photograph by Jodi Rowley

New Frog Found in Viet Nam

by Carrie Arnold

High in the remote mountains of Vietnam, scientists have found a “striking” new species of pink-and-yellow frog covered with sharp spikes.

Jodi Rowley, an expert on Southeast Asian amphibians, had never seen a frog with such spiny skin, and neither had her colleagues.

That’s because thorny tree frogs (Gracixalus lumarius), as they’re named in a new study published April 2 in the journal Zootaxa, are found only on Mount Ngoc Linh and surrounding peaks above 5,900 feet (1,800 m).

“Almost every tree hole we looked in had these frogs. They seem to be only from the tops of mountains in this one area in Vietnam, and this region is known to be home to a bunch of species that are found nowhere else,” said Rowley, a biologist at the Australian Museum Research Institute in Sydney. Although her and her colleagues didn’t spot that many tree holes, nearly every one they did find had a frog…

(read more: http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2014/04/03/new-frog-species-vietnam-animals-science-world/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Social&utm_content=link_fb20140406ngnw-frogsp&utm_campaign=Content)

Photograph by Jodi Rowley

New Frog Discovered… In a Swimming Pool!
by Carrie Arnold
A few weeks ago, a boy in eastern Colombia found more than just fun in his swimming pool—he discovered a new species of frog.

The 1.5-inch-long (4-cm-long) frog “is rather strange-looking—it’s quite fat with short legs and bright orange spots on its sides,” said Luis German Naranjo, WWF Colombia‘s conservation director.
Naranjo and a team of scientists were surveying wildlife in eastern Colombia’s Orinoco savanna, including animals found on a small farm.
Expecting to find little more than livestock, the team was surprised when the farmer’s seven-year-old son, whose name was given only as Camilito, called the group over to a pool. There, in the water, was the small spotted frog…
(read more: National Geo)
Photograph by Adam Dixon, WWF

New Frog Discovered… In a Swimming Pool!

by Carrie Arnold

A few weeks ago, a boy in eastern Colombia found more than just fun in his swimming pool—he discovered a new species of frog.

The 1.5-inch-long (4-cm-long) frog “is rather strange-looking—it’s quite fat with short legs and bright orange spots on its sides,” said Luis German Naranjo, WWF Colombia‘s conservation director.

Naranjo and a team of scientists were surveying wildlife in eastern Colombia’s Orinoco savanna, including animals found on a small farm.

Expecting to find little more than livestock, the team was surprised when the farmer’s seven-year-old son, whose name was given only as Camilito, called the group over to a pool. There, in the water, was the small spotted frog…

(read more: National Geo)

Photograph by Adam Dixon, WWF

Chorus Frogs (genus Pseudacris*) 
… are cool-weather breeders. In the south they are sometimes called ‘winter frogs’, as they breed - and call - during the months associated with cool rains. In the north they are in hibernation during the winter, but are often the very first frogs heard after spring thaw, emerging with the earliest warm rains. They are relatively cold-tolerant frogs, with hardy individuals sometimes heard calling when the temperature is only a few degrees above freezing, when other frog species are silent. 
Chorus frogs are related to treefrogs of the genus Hyla; they also have sticky toe disks (albeit smaller than in treefrogs) and are able to climb vertical surfaces. They can be attracted to lights and are sometimes found clinging to the outside of windows, especially in the fall when the summer’s newly-metamorphosed individuals are dispersing to new ponds.
*the genus also includes the Spring Peeper, P. crucifer
photo by Dave Huth (DaveHuth) on Flickr
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

Chorus Frogs (genus Pseudacris*)

… are cool-weather breeders. In the south they are sometimes called ‘winter frogs’, as they breed - and call - during the months associated with cool rains. In the north they are in hibernation during the winter, but are often the very first frogs heard after spring thaw, emerging with the earliest warm rains. They are relatively cold-tolerant frogs, with hardy individuals sometimes heard calling when the temperature is only a few degrees above freezing, when other frog species are silent.

Chorus frogs are related to treefrogs of the genus Hyla; they also have sticky toe disks (albeit smaller than in treefrogs) and are able to climb vertical surfaces. They can be attracted to lights and are sometimes found clinging to the outside of windows, especially in the fall when the summer’s newly-metamorphosed individuals are dispersing to new ponds.

*the genus also includes the Spring Peeper, P. crucifer

photo by Dave Huth (DaveHuth) on Flickr

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

Sunday Species Snapshot: Panamanian Golden Frog
by John R. Platt
These tiny, brightly colored amphibians pack a potent neurotoxin on their skin. That toxin protected them from predators, but it won’t save them from extinction. They haven’t been seen in the wild in seven years.
Species name: Panamanian golden frog (Atelopus zeteki). This is actually a misnomer. These “frogs” are actually toads!
Where found: The mountain ranges and streams of central Panama. Well, that’s where they used to be found…
IUCN Red List status: Officially they are still listed as critically endangered, but populations of this species have crashed so dramatically that they may actually be functionally extinct, if not already extinct, in the wild. The last documented frog in the wild was seen in 2007.
Major threat: Long protected under Panamanian law, the golden frogs have faced numerous threats ranging from deforestation to water pollution to the pet trade. But it was the arrival of the amphibian-killing disease chytridiomycosis in 2004 which effectively (and quite quickly) wiped out this species…
(read more: Scientific American)
image by Heather Paul via Flickr.

Sunday Species Snapshot: Panamanian Golden Frog

by John R. Platt

These tiny, brightly colored amphibians pack a potent neurotoxin on their skin. That toxin protected them from predators, but it won’t save them from extinction. They haven’t been seen in the wild in seven years.

Species name: Panamanian golden frog (Atelopus zeteki). This is actually a misnomer. These “frogs” are actually toads!

Where found: The mountain ranges and streams of central Panama. Well, that’s where they used to be found…

IUCN Red List status: Officially they are still listed as critically endangered, but populations of this species have crashed so dramatically that they may actually be functionally extinct, if not already extinct, in the wild. The last documented frog in the wild was seen in 2007.

Major threat: Long protected under Panamanian law, the golden frogs have faced numerous threats ranging from deforestation to water pollution to the pet trade. But it was the arrival of the amphibian-killing disease chytridiomycosis in 2004 which effectively (and quite quickly) wiped out this species…

(read more: Scientific American)

image by Heather Paul via Flickr.

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The Archey’s Frog, a Critically Endangered species from New Zealand
The Archey’s Frog, Leiopelma archeyi (Leiopelmatidae) is a rare frog endemic to New Zealand. It is the smallest of the indigenous species (<38 mm) which are restricted to two regions on the North Island of New Zealand [1].
Archey’s frog is one of the world’s most primitive frogs, almost indistinguishable from the fossilized remains of frogs that lived 150 million years ago, leading to its description as a “living fossil” [2]. 
Leiopelma archeyi has bizarre features such as tail-wagging muscles (despite having no tail to wag) and no eardrums. It therefore does not communicate by sound, but is instead thought to employ scent. The male guards the eggs in moist nests and the tailed froglets that hatch out crawl onto the father’s back where they remain for several weeks whilst they develop [2]. 
Formerly, this species was recorded in the tens of thousands, but declines since 1996 have reduced the numbers throughout their range. The decline was first noted in 1996; one study population on the Tapu Ridge declined by 88% (433 frogs down to 53 frogs) over the period 1996-2002. So, L. archeyi is classified as a Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red List [3].
It is primarily threatened by a virulent fungal disease (chytridiomycosis), as well as introduced predators such as rats and mice [2].
Photo credit: ©James T. Reardon

smartpeopleposting:

The Archey’s Frog, a Critically Endangered species from New Zealand

The Archey’s Frog, Leiopelma archeyi (Leiopelmatidae) is a rare frog endemic to New Zealand. It is the smallest of the indigenous species (<38 mm) which are restricted to two regions on the North Island of New Zealand [1].

Archey’s frog is one of the world’s most primitive frogs, almost indistinguishable from the fossilized remains of frogs that lived 150 million years ago, leading to its description as a “living fossil” [2]. 

Leiopelma archeyi has bizarre features such as tail-wagging muscles (despite having no tail to wag) and no eardrums. It therefore does not communicate by sound, but is instead thought to employ scent. The male guards the eggs in moist nests and the tailed froglets that hatch out crawl onto the father’s back where they remain for several weeks whilst they develop [2]. 

Formerly, this species was recorded in the tens of thousands, but declines since 1996 have reduced the numbers throughout their range. The decline was first noted in 1996; one study population on the Tapu Ridge declined by 88% (433 frogs down to 53 frogs) over the period 1996-2002. So, L. archeyi is classified as a Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red List [3].

It is primarily threatened by a virulent fungal disease (chytridiomycosis), as well as introduced predators such as rats and mice [2].

Photo credit: ©James T. Reardon

Scientists uncover new species of Andean marsupial frog
by Jordanna Dulaney
Recently, herpetologists welcomed a new species of marsupial frog, known as Gastrotheca dysprosita and described in the journal Phyllomedusa.
Unlike mammal marsupials, which typically carry their young in pouches on their torsos and are found primarily in Australia, the Gastrotheca genus of frogs, which contains 62 species, is found in the Andes region on South America and sport their pouches on their backs (also called a &#8220;dorsal brood pouch&#8221;).
The female frog&#8217;s vascular tissue provides oxygen to the eggs, which she carries for three to four months until they hatch as fully-developed froglets and head off on their own&#8230;
(read more: MongaBay)
photo: William E. Duellman

Scientists uncover new species of Andean marsupial frog

by Jordanna Dulaney

Recently, herpetologists welcomed a new species of marsupial frog, known as Gastrotheca dysprosita and described in the journal Phyllomedusa.

Unlike mammal marsupials, which typically carry their young in pouches on their torsos and are found primarily in Australia, the Gastrotheca genus of frogs, which contains 62 species, is found in the Andes region on South America and sport their pouches on their backs (also called a “dorsal brood pouch”).

The female frog’s vascular tissue provides oxygen to the eggs, which she carries for three to four months until they hatch as fully-developed froglets and head off on their own…

(read more: MongaBay)

photo: William E. Duellman

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Fort Randolph robber frog | ©Aaron G.    (Panama)
Pristimantis gaigei (Craugastoridae) is a nocturnal species of primary humid lowland forest, and secondary forest. Adults are found under surface debris and in leaf-litter, its range often associated with caves or rocky stream banks. It breeds by direct development. This species is native to Colombia; Costa Rica, and Panama [source].

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Fort Randolph robber frog | ©Aaron G.    (Panama)

Pristimantis gaigei (Craugastoridae) is a nocturnal species of primary humid lowland forest, and secondary forest. Adults are found under surface debris and in leaf-litter, its range often associated with caves or rocky stream banks. It breeds by direct development. This species is native to Colombia; Costa Rica, and Panama [source].

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Splendid Treefrog (Cruziohyla calcarifer) | ©Otto Monge
Cruziohyla calcarifer (Hylidae) from Sarapiquí, Heredia, Costa Rica.
This species was previously within the genus Agalychnis but was moved to the new genus Cruziohyla in 2005.
The Splendid Trrefrog is native to Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. This species is often considered to be rare, although more likely it is under-recorded, since it is a canopy frog and has a very soft call. Only occasional individuals are seen from time to time.
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Splendid Treefrog (Cruziohyla calcarifer) | ©Otto Monge

Cruziohyla calcarifer (Hylidae) from Sarapiquí, Heredia, Costa Rica.

This species was previously within the genus Agalychnis but was moved to the new genus Cruziohyla in 2005.

The Splendid Trrefrog is native to Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. This species is often considered to be rare, although more likely it is under-recorded, since it is a canopy frog and has a very soft call. Only occasional individuals are seen from time to time.

[Source]