libutron
libutron:

Pirre Harlequin frog  (Pirri Range Stubfoot Toad)
Actually the Pirre Harlequin frog is not a frog but a toad of the species Atelopus glyphus (Bufonidae), found in eastern Panama, in the Serranía de Pirre, and Colombia, in the Chocó.
Atelopus glyphus is currently classified as a Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red List, since like other species within the genus, their populations are being severely affected the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis that causes chytridiomycosis disease.
Specimen pictured is a juvenile captive-bred as part of the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, an organization based in Panama, which is making significant efforts to establish colonies of the harlequin frogs and develop methods to reduce the impact of chytrid fungus, so that one day the captive amphibians may be reintroduced to their habitat.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Brian Gratwicke | Locality: Panama

libutron:

Pirre Harlequin frog  (Pirri Range Stubfoot Toad)

Actually the Pirre Harlequin frog is not a frog but a toad of the species Atelopus glyphus (Bufonidae), found in eastern Panama, in the Serranía de Pirre, and Colombia, in the Chocó.

Atelopus glyphus is currently classified as a Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red List, since like other species within the genus, their populations are being severely affected the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis that causes chytridiomycosis disease.

Specimen pictured is a juvenile captive-bred as part of the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, an organization based in Panama, which is making significant efforts to establish colonies of the harlequin frogs and develop methods to reduce the impact of chytrid fungus, so that one day the captive amphibians may be reintroduced to their habitat.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Brian Gratwicke | Locality: Panama

Common Frog larvae have developed rapid defenses against red swamp crayfish
Source: Plataforma SINC
The common frog (Pelophylax perezi) is one of the amphibians with the highest distribution in the Iberian Peninsula. It reproduces preferably in permanent areas of water where it comes into contact with the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), which preys on its larvae. Research confirms that the larvae of these frogs have developed a defensive response to the invasive species…
(read more: Science Daily)
photo: Ángel Ruiz Elizalde

Common Frog larvae have developed rapid defenses against red swamp crayfish

Source: Plataforma SINC

The common frog (Pelophylax perezi) is one of the amphibians with the highest distribution in the Iberian Peninsula. It reproduces preferably in permanent areas of water where it comes into contact with the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), which preys on its larvae. Research confirms that the larvae of these frogs have developed a defensive response to the invasive species…

(read more: Science Daily)

photo: Ángel Ruiz Elizalde

Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks - CA, USA

Every summer, biological technicians spend weeks in the wilderness studying the mountain yellow legged frog (Rana muscosa). Non-native trout species have reduced frog numbers by 92 percent. Park employees work to remove invasive trout from the alpine lakes to give the frogs a chance at survival.
Every summer, biological technicians spend weeks in the wilderness studying the mountain yellow legged frog (Rana muscosa). Non-native trout species have reduced frog numbers by 92 percent. Park employees work to remove invasive trout from the alpine lakes to give the frogs a chance at survival.
libutron

astronomy-to-zoology:

 Desert Rain Frog

(Breviceps macrops)

is a species of frog that is found in shrubland and shores in Namibia and South Africa. they can be identified by their plumpness, short snout and limbs and on their underside they have a transparent area of skin in which you can see their internal organs. they are nocturnal spending their entire day in a burrow that they dig then at night they emerge and wander the beach, they spend time around patches of dung where they wait for bugs. they are called rain frogs because they are known to come up when it rains. they are also victims to habitat loss and are listed as vulnerable by the IUCN.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Amphibia-Anura-Microhylidae-Breviceps

libutron

libutron:

The ‘Frog Glue’ of the Crucifix Frog 

This peculiar frog is an Australian endemic species that occurs in central inland New South Wales and the interior of southern Queensland. Its scientific name is Notaden bennettii (Myobatrachidae), and is better known as the Crucifix Frog or Holy Cross Frog because of the pattern of dark spots on its back resembling a cross.

Notaden bennettii is a fossorial frog, it means that is adapted to spend most of its life underground. They only emerge after heavy rains and breed in temporary pools.

Frogs of this species (and also of N. melanoscaphus and N. nichollsi)  produce an exudate, secreted by glands on their backs, that quickly sets into an adhesive and elastic material. They secrete the sticky material when they are provoked, probably in an attempt to deter potential predators.

The frogs typically live 1m underground in dried mud for nine months of the year. When they emerge are vulnerable to insect attacks and so a possible use of the exudate may be to jam the jaws of biting insects like ants, sticking them to the frog’s skin, which it later sheds and eats. The exudate sets rapidly as a yellow-colored tacky elastic solid, and sticks well even in the frog’s moist habitat.

Preliminary studies of this adhesive, which is biocompatible, have shown its several useful potential properties for medical applications.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©paulhypnos  |  [Top]  -  [Bottom]

Locality: Australia

libutron
libutron:

Borneo Tree-hole frog - A frog that exploits resonance effects
The Borneo Tree-hole frog, Metaphrynella sundana (Microhylidae),a small Asian frog with just 22 mm length, actively exploit the acoustic properties of cavities in tree trunks that are partially filled with water and which are primarily used as egg-deposition sites.
By tuning their vocalizations to the resonant frequency of the hole, which varies with the amount of water that it contains, these frogs enhance their chances of attracting females.
This species occurs in Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia and Malaysia.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Jeremy Holden
Locality: Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia

libutron:

Borneo Tree-hole frog - A frog that exploits resonance effects

The Borneo Tree-hole frog, Metaphrynella sundana (Microhylidae),a small Asian frog with just 22 mm length, actively exploit the acoustic properties of cavities in tree trunks that are partially filled with water and which are primarily used as egg-deposition sites.

By tuning their vocalizations to the resonant frequency of the hole, which varies with the amount of water that it contains, these frogs enhance their chances of attracting females.

This species occurs in Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia and Malaysia.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Jeremy Holden

Locality: Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia

libutron

libutron:

Black-Spotted Rock Frog  (Rock Frog, Mindanao Splash Frog)

Staurois natator (Ranidae), the Black-Spotted Rock Frog, is a species found in Palawan, Mindanao, Leyte, Bohol, Basilan, Busuanga, Culion, and Samar Islands in the Philippines, and has been observed at many sites in Borneo (in Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei Darussalam).

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Wong Hock Weng  |  [Top]  -  [Bottom]

Locality: Gunung Gading National Park, Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia

Bushveld Rain Frog Feeding

This little frog is a close relative of the ‘World’s cutest frog’, in fact they are in the same genus, Bushveld rain frog (Breviceps adspersus). I made this video for those wanting to learn more about these unusual frogs. This specimen was found in coastal forest along the east coast of South Africa, nearly a staggering 2000 km’s away from the north-western parts the Desert rain frog calls home.

To see other amphibians, reptiles & creepy crawlies I photographed while out in the African wilderness, go check out my photography page here:

http://deanboshoff.wix.com/deanboshoff