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Black-Spotted Rock Frog  (Rock Frog, Mindanao Splash Frog)

Staurois natator (Ranidae), the Black-Spotted Rock Frog, is a species found in Palawan, Mindanao, Leyte, Bohol, Basilan, Busuanga, Culion, and Samar Islands in the Philippines, and has been observed at many sites in Borneo (in Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei Darussalam).

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Wong Hock Weng  |  [Top]  -  [Bottom]

Locality: Gunung Gading National Park, Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia

Bushveld Rain Frog Feeding

This little frog is a close relative of the ‘World’s cutest frog’, in fact they are in the same genus, Bushveld rain frog (Breviceps adspersus). I made this video for those wanting to learn more about these unusual frogs. This specimen was found in coastal forest along the east coast of South Africa, nearly a staggering 2000 km’s away from the north-western parts the Desert rain frog calls home.

To see other amphibians, reptiles & creepy crawlies I photographed while out in the African wilderness, go check out my photography page here:

http://deanboshoff.wix.com/deanboshoff

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River Toad  (Rough Toad, Giant Asian Toad, Kodok Buduk Sungal, Kodok Puru Besar)
Bufo asper, Syn. Phrynoidis aspera (Bufonidae), is an Asian toad with large and stout body (100-140mm snout-vent length). The skin is covered with warts or tubercles; so the name of this species derives from its rough skin texture.
This species occurs in Brunei Darussalam; Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar and Thailand. It is consumed for food in Sabah and peninsular Malaysia .
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Ingomar Kiehlmann
Locality: Bukit Larut, Malaysia

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River Toad  (Rough Toad, Giant Asian Toad, Kodok Buduk Sungal, Kodok Puru Besar)

Bufo asper, Syn. Phrynoidis aspera (Bufonidae), is an Asian toad with large and stout body (100-140mm snout-vent length). The skin is covered with warts or tubercles; so the name of this species derives from its rough skin texture.

This species occurs in Brunei Darussalam; Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar and Thailand. It is consumed for food in Sabah and peninsular Malaysia .

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Ingomar Kiehlmann

Locality: Bukit Larut, Malaysia

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Rhacophorus lateralis: a species with an inusual nesting behavior
 Rhacophorus lateralis (Rhacophoridae) is a very rare frog endemic to India. Two color morphs of the species have been observed, one morph with a dominantly green dorsum (was shown in the photo), and the other with  brown dorsum with a mixture of varying shades of green.
It is an arboreal frog with a specialized nest building behavior, unique among Rhacophorus species. A purse-like nest is made over water by folding a single leaf around the egg mass (embryos and translucent foam) by the female alone after oviposition. The function of this parental investment is to prevent desiccation of eggs in open sunlight. 
In 204, the IUCN assessed this species as Endangered and considered its range to be restricted to two small areas of Wyanad and Coorg in southern Western Ghats of India. However, in 2009 this species was reported also from Shanthi Estate, Coorg; and, in 2010 from the surroundings of Bhadra Tiger Reserve and Kudremukh National Park.
References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]
Photo credit: ©Vipin Baliga
Locality: Virajpet, Karnataka, Western Ghats, India.

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Rhacophorus lateralis: a species with an inusual nesting behavior

Rhacophorus lateralis (Rhacophoridae) is a very rare frog endemic to India. Two color morphs of the species have been observed, one morph with a dominantly green dorsum (was shown in the photo), and the other with  brown dorsum with a mixture of varying shades of green.

It is an arboreal frog with a specialized nest building behavior, unique among Rhacophorus species. A purse-like nest is made over water by folding a single leaf around the egg mass (embryos and translucent foam) by the female alone after oviposition. The function of this parental investment is to prevent desiccation of eggs in open sunlight. 

In 204, the IUCN assessed this species as Endangered and considered its range to be restricted to two small areas of Wyanad and Coorg in southern Western Ghats of India. However, in 2009 this species was reported also from Shanthi Estate, Coorg; and, in 2010 from the surroundings of Bhadra Tiger Reserve and Kudremukh National Park.

References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]

Photo credit: ©Vipin Baliga

Locality: Virajpet, Karnataka, Western Ghats, India.

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Masako ball frog  (Masako fishing frog)
Aubria masako (Pyxicephalidae) is a relatively large (60-100 mm long) brown frog with a large, distinct tympanum. 
This species ranges from southeastern Cameroon and eastern Gabon, east through southwestern Central African Republic and northern Republic of the Congo to central Democratic Republic of Congo.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Konrad Mebert
Locality: Banalia-Longala, Democratic Republic of Congo

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Masako ball frog  (Masako fishing frog)

Aubria masako (Pyxicephalidae) is a relatively large (60-100 mm long) brown frog with a large, distinct tympanum. 

This species ranges from southeastern Cameroon and eastern Gabon, east through southwestern Central African Republic and northern Republic of the Congo to central Democratic Republic of Congo.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Konrad Mebert

Locality: Banalia-Longala, Democratic Republic of Congo

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Angola Banana Frog (Congo Spiny Reed Frog, Osorio’s Spiny Reed Frog)
Afrixalus osorioi (Hyperoliidae), the Angola Banana Frog, is a large Afrixalus species (males 27–31 mm, females 32–35 mm) from bushland from Angola to Uganda.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Konrad Mebert
Locality: Banalia-Longala, Democratic Republic of the Congo

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Angola Banana Frog (Congo Spiny Reed Frog, Osorio’s Spiny Reed Frog)

Afrixalus osorioi (Hyperoliidae), the Angola Banana Frog, is a large Afrixalus species (males 27–31 mm, females 32–35 mm) from bushland from Angola to Uganda.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Konrad Mebert

Locality: Banalia-Longala, Democratic Republic of the Congo

The male Panamanian Golden Frog (Atelopus zeteki) has a subtle way of attracting females… it waves. This friendly gesture can arouse the attention of a rival male, which often ends in a wrestling match.

* Since this footage was filmed, this species has gone extinct in the wild due to the deadly chytrid fungus. Conservationists now care for the last of this frog in various zoos and other institutions.

with David Attenborrough

(via: Nature - PBS)