astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

"Hebrew Volute" (Voluta ebraea)
…a species of volute (Volutidae) which is endemic to north and northeastern Brazil (I have no idea why its called Hebrew) where it occupy the littoral zone, generally in areas with coral and rocks. Like other volutids Hebrew volutes are carnivorous/predatory and will feed on other gastropods and bivalves (notably Trachycardium muricatum and Stramontia haemastoma)
Classification
Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-Caenogastropoda-Hypsogastropoda-Neogastropoda-Muricoidea-Volutidae-Voluta-V. ebraea
Image: Thelma Lúcia Pereira Dias

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Hebrew Volute" (Voluta ebraea)

…a species of volute (Volutidae) which is endemic to north and northeastern Brazil (I have no idea why its called Hebrew) where it occupy the littoral zone, generally in areas with coral and rocks. Like other volutids Hebrew volutes are carnivorous/predatory and will feed on other gastropods and bivalves (notably Trachycardium muricatum and Stramontia haemastoma)

Classification

Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-Caenogastropoda-Hypsogastropoda-Neogastropoda-Muricoidea-Volutidae-Voluta-V. ebraea

Image: Thelma Lúcia Pereira Dias

Redwood National and State Parks - CA, USA
Keep your eyes out for our local predatory snail, the robust lancetooth (Haplotrema vancouverense). 
Sometimes known as an albino snail for its pearly-white body, this snail is a true carnivore who devours slugs, earthworms, millipedes, and even other snails. The snail’s name comes from the extra-long and extra-sharp teeth on its radula, the tough, sandpapery tongue it uses to eat. 
This particular robust lancetooth was caught redhanded in the middle of the trail enjoying a meal of its less fortunate kin. Proof positive that big things can come in small packages!

Keep your eyes out for our local predatory snail, the robust lancetooth (Haplotrema vancouverense).

Sometimes known as an albino snail for its pearly-white body, this snail is a true carnivore who devours slugs, earthworms, millipedes, and even other snails. The snail’s name comes from the extra-long and extra-sharp teeth on its radula, the tough, sandpapery tongue it uses to eat.

This particular robust lancetooth was caught redhanded in the middle of the trail enjoying a meal of its less fortunate kin. Proof positive that big things can come in small packages!

Semen Says:
Scientists report for the first time that a snail’s seminal fluid proteins can suppress the mating success of the male side of its hermaphroditic partner.
by Rina Shaikh-Lesko
Although copulation is often brief, males of many animal species leave a lasting impression on their mates. The seminal fluid they deposit contains not just sperm, but proteins that can alter the physiology and behavior of the female, often in ways that hurt the paternal success of her subsequent mates.
Among hermaphrodites—animals with both male and female reproductive organs—mates themselves are potential competitors, too, and copulation gives seminal fluid proteins the unique opportunity to directly manipulate the recipient’s male as well as female function.
Ovipostatin, a seminal fluid protein (SFP) in the hermaphroditic freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis, cuts egg production in half in the sperm recipient, according to a 2010 study led by Joris Koene of VU University Amsterdam in the Netherlands.
It’s been theorized that SFPs might also affect the sperm-producing capacity of recipient snails—their maleness—to reduce competition within a population. “It had been predicted … more than 30 years ago, but no one had properly tested it,” says Koene…
(read more: The Scientist)
illustration: © Scott Leighton

Semen Says:

Scientists report for the first time that a snail’s seminal fluid proteins can suppress the mating success of the male side of its hermaphroditic partner.

by Rina Shaikh-Lesko

Although copulation is often brief, males of many animal species leave a lasting impression on their mates. The seminal fluid they deposit contains not just sperm, but proteins that can alter the physiology and behavior of the female, often in ways that hurt the paternal success of her subsequent mates.

Among hermaphrodites—animals with both male and female reproductive organs—mates themselves are potential competitors, too, and copulation gives seminal fluid proteins the unique opportunity to directly manipulate the recipient’s male as well as female function.

Ovipostatin, a seminal fluid protein (SFP) in the hermaphroditic freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis, cuts egg production in half in the sperm recipient, according to a 2010 study led by Joris Koene of VU University Amsterdam in the Netherlands.

It’s been theorized that SFPs might also affect the sperm-producing capacity of recipient snails—their maleness—to reduce competition within a population. “It had been predicted … more than 30 years ago, but no one had properly tested it,” says Koene…

(read more: The Scientist)

illustration: © Scott Leighton

astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Cymatium lotorium
…is a species of triton (Ranellidae) which is widely distributed throughout the Indo-Pacific oceans. Like other tritons Cymantium lotorium is a predator and will feed on echinoderms and other molluscs by gripping them with its muscular foot and using its radula to saw through their hard shells/skin. Once it has finished “drilling” it will inject a paralyzing saliva into the prey which subdues the prey allowing C. lotorium to feed at its leisure. 
Classification
Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-Caenogastropoda-Hypsogastropoda-Littorinimorpha-Tonnoidea-Ranellidae-Ranellinae-Cymatium-C. lotorium
Image: George Chernilvsky 

astronomy-to-zoology:

Cymatium lotorium

…is a species of triton (Ranellidae) which is widely distributed throughout the Indo-Pacific oceans. Like other tritons Cymantium lotorium is a predator and will feed on echinoderms and other molluscs by gripping them with its muscular foot and using its radula to saw through their hard shells/skin. Once it has finished “drilling” it will inject a paralyzing saliva into the prey which subdues the prey allowing C. lotorium to feed at its leisure. 

Classification

Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-Caenogastropoda-Hypsogastropoda-Littorinimorpha-Tonnoidea-Ranellidae-Ranellinae-Cymatium-C. lotorium

Image: George Chernilvsky 

Hopkin’s Rose Nudubranch (Okenia rosacea)

- Pillar Point, Princeton, CA, USA

Feeds on the bryozoan Eurystomella bilabiata, which is also a rosy color.Lays eggs in a narrow rose-colored ribbon spiraled counterclockwise. The nudibranch Navanax inermis eats this species. There are no digestive diverticula in the cerata-like growths. Named after Timothy Hopkins, a railroad executive who helped establish Hopkins Marine Station.

(Read more: Encyclopedia of Life)

Photo: Ken-ichi Ueda via iNaturalist

libutron

libutron:

Ornate Sapsucking Slug  (Ornate Elysia)

Elysia ornata is a sea slug in the Family Plakobranchidae (Order Sacoglossa)Its body is a translucent leaf-green in color with speckles of white and black. The parapodial margin is black with a yellow or orange submarginal band. The green rhinophores are usually black-tipped, but can also have orange bands (as shown).

It is also known as Ornate Leaf Slug. They feed on green algae (Bryopsis sp.), and reaches a length of 5cm.

This species is circumtropical and can be found both in the Caribbean and the Pacific Ocean.

Reference: [1

Photo credit: ©Blogie | [Top] - [Bottom]

Locality: Off the coast of Paradise island Beach Resort, Samal Island, Philippines (less than 10m depth)

paisleywitch-deactivated2014061

tervaneula:

MORE SNAILS WHEEEEE we took new photos of them today with Piippu

These are Achatina fulica f. white jade, they can be found from this post over here as well. They are already adults! <3<3<3 Miss Universum is 8.5 cm and Riviera 8 cm in shell length. We had a third one, who is seen in the post I linked, but he never really grew and died just recently. Rest in peace, sweet little Invisible Man. ♥

But these two, I really really REALLY love them ahhh they’ve already been showing each other their love darts, I can’t wait for them to lay eggs! Though… there’s always a possibility that neither of them is fertile, but I won’t give up hope! SNAIL BABBIES IHIHIIIIII

Corolla ovate - a rare sea butterfly     
This tiny sea butterfly spends its days floating in the ocean, feeding on plankton
by Becky Crew
FLOATING THROUGH THE ocean like a lonely spacecraft on a mission to smother its transparent hull in stars, Corolla ovate is a rarely encountered species of sea butterfly.
Found all around the world&#8217;s oceans at depths of up to 2km, this tiny creature is known to haunt the coast of Australia, in the Bismarck, Solomon and Coral seas up near the Cape York Peninsula and Papua New Guinea, and down south in the Bass Strait.
It&#8217;s delicate thing, at just 4cm long, and spends most of its days trying to avoid the enormous mucous webs laid out for it by carnivorous sea slugs called Cliopsis. Also known as sea angels, these formidable hunters are the sea butterfly&#8217;s own Doctor Who nightmare&#8230;
(read more: Australian Geographic)
photo by Philippe Poppe

Corolla ovate - a rare sea butterfly     

This tiny sea butterfly spends its days floating in the ocean, feeding on plankton

by Becky Crew

FLOATING THROUGH THE ocean like a lonely spacecraft on a mission to smother its transparent hull in stars, Corolla ovate is a rarely encountered species of sea butterfly.

Found all around the world’s oceans at depths of up to 2km, this tiny creature is known to haunt the coast of Australia, in the Bismarck, Solomon and Coral seas up near the Cape York Peninsula and Papua New Guinea, and down south in the Bass Strait.

It’s delicate thing, at just 4cm long, and spends most of its days trying to avoid the enormous mucous webs laid out for it by carnivorous sea slugs called Cliopsis. Also known as sea angels, these formidable hunters are the sea butterfly’s own Doctor Who nightmare

(read more: Australian Geographic)

photo by Philippe Poppe

Pleurobranchaea californica 
&#8230; is a large snail (a sea slug in the family Pleurobranchidae) without a shell. It can get to over 8 inches long and live at depths to 400 meters (~1200 feet). Its mottled brown mantle resembles the muddy bottom on which it forages. It feeds on a variety of sand and mud bottom invertebrates, but has also been documented to eat small flatfish, and sometimes cannibalizes its own species! 
This species is a common inhabitant of the muddy seafloor observed using MBARI&#8217;s ROV Ventana at depths between 100 and 400&#160;m.
(via: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)

Pleurobranchaea californica

… is a large snail (a sea slug in the family Pleurobranchidae) without a shell. It can get to over 8 inches long and live at depths to 400 meters (~1200 feet). Its mottled brown mantle resembles the muddy bottom on which it forages. It feeds on a variety of sand and mud bottom invertebrates, but has also been documented to eat small flatfish, and sometimes cannibalizes its own species!

This species is a common inhabitant of the muddy seafloor observed using MBARI’s ROV Ventana at depths between 100 and 400 m.

(via: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)