Critically Endangered Dama Gazelle Caught on Camera in Sahara

via: Wildlife Extra

Barbary sheep, caracal and poachers also caught on camera

Listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, the Dama gazelle is one of the world’s rarest and most endangered antelopes. Formerly common across its grassland habitats of the Sahelian zone of Africa, it now only exists in a small handful of tiny, isolated populations in Niger and Chad.

Overhunting means just 300 Dama gazelle left in the wild

With overhunting by far the major cause for its demise, the Dama gazelle is also prone to encroachment of its preferred habitats by livestock development and agriculture, as well by severe drought and desertification. In all, there are probably no more than 300 Dama gazelles in the wild today…

(read more)

photos via Sahara Conservation Fund

National Zoo’s New Baby Gazelle Runs Around the Yard

by Benjamin R. Freed

The Smithsonian’s National Zoo is showing off its newest specimen this week, and guess what? It’s freaking adorable. A female gazelle

calf that was born October 13 debuted to the public on Wednesday, and is already running around the yard with its siblings.

The calf, which does not yet have a name, joined the other gazelles in the mixed species exhibit at the zoo’s Cheetah Conservation Station. Along with gazelles, the exhibit also houses Ruppell’s griffon vultures and two male scimitar-horned oryx. The new gazelle’s mother is three-year-old Zafirah. It was sired by male gazelle Raul, who also fathered a male calf born September 4. Player.

Dama gazelles are one of the most critically endangered species, with fewer than 500 specimens remaining in the wild, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

And, oh yeah, as a bonus the zoo also has this video of the male calf running and stouting—a bouncy gait in which all four legs lift up from the ground—around the yard.

(via and see video at: The DCist)          (images: Smithsonian National Zoo)

Mongolian Gazelle Studies
A Mongolian gazelle is fitted with a satellite tracking collar by Wildlife Conservation Society conservationists.
Gathering in vast herds on Mongolian’s Eastern Steppe, gazelles like this one have been part of a decade long wildlife health study conducted to determine the causes of Foot and Mouth disease outbreaks. As it turns out from WCS’s research, livestock, rather than gazelles, drive the viral spread of the highly contagious disease. 
Learn more http://bit.ly/wC8dvT
(Photo © Takehiko Y. Ito/Arid Land Research Center-Tottori University)

Mongolian Gazelle Studies

A Mongolian gazelle is fitted with a satellite tracking collar by Wildlife Conservation Society conservationists.

Gathering in vast herds on Mongolian’s Eastern Steppe, gazelles like this one have been part of a decade long wildlife health study conducted to determine the causes of Foot and Mouth disease outbreaks. As it turns out from WCS’s research, livestock, rather than gazelles, drive the viral spread of the highly contagious disease.

Learn more http://bit.ly/wC8dvT

(Photo © Takehiko Y. Ito/Arid Land Research Center-Tottori University)