TSA Turtle Tuesday:  Sulawesi Forest Turtle 
 Little is known about the critically endangered Sulawesi Forest Turtle (Leucocephalon yuwonoi). The species occurs in a very remote region of Indonesia, in the forest of North and Central Sulawesi. 
When spotted in the wild, they can be found along heavily wooded banks and in shallow clear streams. It is believed that their natural diet consists of various insects, leaves and fallen fruit. Because this species is so close to extinction in the wild, the TSA has made the management of a sustainable captive population a top priority. 
Read more about our work with this amazing species…
 (Turtle Survival Alliance) 
photograph credit: Sheena Koeth

TSA Turtle Tuesday:  Sulawesi Forest Turtle

Little is known about the critically endangered Sulawesi Forest Turtle (Leucocephalon yuwonoi). The species occurs in a very remote region of Indonesia, in the forest of North and Central Sulawesi.

When spotted in the wild, they can be found along heavily wooded banks and in shallow clear streams. It is believed that their natural diet consists of various insects, leaves and fallen fruit. Because this species is so close to extinction in the wild, the TSA has made the management of a sustainable captive population a top priority.

Read more about our work with this amazing species…

(Turtle Survival Alliance)

photograph credit: Sheena Koeth

libutron
libutron:

Tiger Egg Cowrie - Cuspivolva tigris | ©Ülar Tikk   (Lembeh, Indonesia)
This beauty is a live Cuspivolva tigris (Gastropoda - Ovulidae), showing the brightly colored mantle covering the shell and the siphon (left side).
The siphon is an anterior extension of the mantle, through which water is drawn into the mantle cavity and over the gill for respiration. 
The mantle is orange-yellow and has black patches with white border, due to this and the ovoid shape of the shell, this species is commonly known as Tigger egg cowrie.

libutron:

Tiger Egg Cowrie - Cuspivolva tigris | ©Ülar Tikk   (Lembeh, Indonesia)

This beauty is a live Cuspivolva tigris (Gastropoda - Ovulidae), showing the brightly colored mantle covering the shell and the siphon (left side).

The siphon is an anterior extension of the mantle, through which water is drawn into the mantle cavity and over the gill for respiration. 

The mantle is orange-yellow and has black patches with white border, due to this and the ovoid shape of the shell, this species is commonly known as Tigger egg cowrie.

Project NOAH Spotting of the Day:  
Spectral Tarsier (Tarsier tarsier)
Small nocturnal primate, endemic to Sulawesi, Indonesia. they have enormous eyes, each eyeball is approximately 16 mm in diameter and is as large as its entire brain.
Tarsiers are one of the main attractions at Tangkoko Batuangus National Park (the other being the black crested macaque). My guide and I went out late afternoon to look for them. He knew a few trees to check, as they live inside tree holes during the day. We found them in the first tree we checked. Three of them living in the tree. At one point all three of them were sitting on the tree, scanning their surroundings, waiting for night to fall. As soon as it got dark, just after 6pm, they left the tree with lightning speed and we soon lost sight of them.
Text/Photo: Dan Doucette
(via: Project NOAH)

Project NOAH Spotting of the Day: 

Spectral Tarsier (Tarsier tarsier)

Small nocturnal primate, endemic to Sulawesi, Indonesia. they have enormous eyes, each eyeball is approximately 16 mm in diameter and is as large as its entire brain.

Tarsiers are one of the main attractions at Tangkoko Batuangus National Park (the other being the black crested macaque). My guide and I went out late afternoon to look for them. He knew a few trees to check, as they live inside tree holes during the day. We found them in the first tree we checked. Three of them living in the tree. At one point all three of them were sitting on the tree, scanning their surroundings, waiting for night to fall. As soon as it got dark, just after 6pm, they left the tree with lightning speed and we soon lost sight of them.

Text/Photo: Dan Doucette

(via: Project NOAH)

reptilefacts

reptilefacts:

reptilesrevolution:

White Lined Gecko. (soon)

White lined geckos (Gekko vittatus) have several common names including lined gecko, sago gecko, and skunk gecko. This species can be found in Indonesia, New Guinea, Palau, and the Solomon Islands. They usually live 3 to 4 years, but 14-year-old individuals are known. [x]

Protecting Elephants in Sumatra
While the Sumatran Orangutan gets the majority of the media play, it’s the elephants who are facing a higher proportional threat to their home range in Aceh, and the impact from this is likely to be much greater.  When the home range of the elephants are damaged through the expanse of roads, mining and industrial agriculture (palm oil and other commodity plantations such as rubber, timber and soy), it’s often elephants and communities who suffer as human wildlife conflict escalates while elephants seek new lands.  Protecting the forest for the elephants also protects the communities. It’s a win win. http://a.ran.org/a7photo: Senior Forest Campaigner Gemma Tillack
(via: Rainforest Action Network)

Protecting Elephants in Sumatra

While the Sumatran Orangutan gets the majority of the media play, it’s the elephants who are facing a higher proportional threat to their home range in Aceh, and the impact from this is likely to be much greater.

When the home range of the elephants are damaged through the expanse of roads, mining and industrial agriculture (palm oil and other commodity plantations such as rubber, timber and soy), it’s often elephants and communities who suffer as human wildlife conflict escalates while elephants seek new lands.

Protecting the forest for the elephants also protects the communities. It’s a win win. http://a.ran.org/a7

photo: Senior Forest Campaigner Gemma Tillack

(via: Rainforest Action Network)

dendroica
conservationbiologist:

The Sulawesi Babirusa, Babyrousa celebensis, is listed as ‘Vulnerable’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is endemic to Indonesia and occurs, as its name suggests, on the island of Sulawesi – specifically in the north. It also still occurs in central Sulawesi and the eastern and southeastern peninsula. 
Numbers of Sulawesi Babirusa have shown a marked reduction on the northern peninsular of Sulawesi primarily as a result of over-hunting, with widespread snare trapping being a major threat to existing populations. The market demand for wild pig meat continues to place severe pressure on the Sulawesi Babirusa, and other areas are now being targeted as the species becomes scarcer in numbers. Commercial logging, together with forest conversion and degradation, are also escalating threats to this species.
Under Indonesian law, the genus Babyrousa has received full protection since 1931. It also protected through its inclusion on Appendix I of CITES since 1982, making it an offence to trade this species or its parts internationally. The Sulawesi Babirusa occurs in several protected areas, although hunting can still pose a threat in some of these.
(via: IUCN)(read more: IUCN)(experts: Wild Pig Specialist Group)(photo: Michel Gunther)

conservationbiologist:

The Sulawesi Babirusa, Babyrousa celebensis, is listed as ‘Vulnerable’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is endemic to Indonesia and occurs, as its name suggests, on the island of Sulawesi – specifically in the north. It also still occurs in central Sulawesi and the eastern and southeastern peninsula. 

Numbers of Sulawesi Babirusa have shown a marked reduction on the northern peninsular of Sulawesi primarily as a result of over-hunting, with widespread snare trapping being a major threat to existing populations. The market demand for wild pig meat continues to place severe pressure on the Sulawesi Babirusa, and other areas are now being targeted as the species becomes scarcer in numbers. Commercial logging, together with forest conversion and degradation, are also escalating threats to this species.

Under Indonesian law, the genus Babyrousa has received full protection since 1931. It also protected through its inclusion on Appendix I of CITES since 1982, making it an offence to trade this species or its parts internationally. The Sulawesi Babirusa occurs in several protected areas, although hunting can still pose a threat in some of these.

(via: IUCN)
(read more: IUCN)
(experts: Wild Pig Specialist Group)
(photo: Michel Gunther)

Indonesia Announces World’s Largest Manta Ray Sanctuary

by Jane J. Lee

One of the world’s largest fishes gets a super-size sanctuary thanks to a decision by the Indonesian government to ban fishing for manta rays within the country’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ).

The move, hailed by conservation organizations and researchers, has resulted in the world’s largest protected area for these migratory animals. Indonesia’s EEZ stretches for almost 2.3 million square miles (6 million square kilometers). (Watch a video to learn more about manta rays.)

Two manta ray species, the reef manta (Manta alfredi) and the oceanic manta (Manta birostris), occur in the waters around Indonesia, and both are afforded protection under this new legislation…

(via: National Geo)

photo: Herman Harsoyo

The Mangrove Robin (Peneoenanthe pulverulenta) is a species of bird in the family Petroicidae which lives in the mangrove forests of Australia, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea. These birds feed on insects, hunting those found in the mud after the tide ebbs; they may also feed on crabs.
Photograph: JJ Harrison                                                                  via: Wikipedia

The Mangrove Robin (Peneoenanthe pulverulenta) is a species of bird in the family Petroicidae which lives in the mangrove forests of Australia, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea. These birds feed on insects, hunting those found in the mud after the tide ebbs; they may also feed on crabs.

Photograph: JJ Harrison                                                                  via: Wikipedia

TSA Turtle Tuesday!
This week we are highlighting the Roti Island snake neck turtle (Chelodina mccordi). Little is known about this critically endangered species from southeastern Indonesia. Its distribution is very limited, being found only on the tiny island of Roti. This relatively small turtle is virtually extinct in the wild due to pressures from the international pet trade. Luckily, this species does very well in captive environments and breeds easily, allowing us to conserve a diverse genetic population.
(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

TSA Turtle Tuesday!

This week we are highlighting the Roti Island snake neck turtle (Chelodina mccordi). Little is known about this critically endangered species from southeastern Indonesia. Its distribution is very limited, being found only on the tiny island of Roti. This relatively small turtle is virtually extinct in the wild due to pressures from the international pet trade. Luckily, this species does very well in captive environments and breeds easily, allowing us to conserve a diverse genetic population.

(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

Catara rugosicollis

…is a species of cockroach that is distributed throughout Malaysia, Sumatra, Java and Borneo. Like many other species of cockroach C. rugosicollis is mainly terrestrial and is capable of releasing a foul smelling chemical when threatened

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Blattodea-Blattidae-Archiblattinae-Catara-C. rugosicollis

Images: Eduard Jendek and bernard DUPONT