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Help Chintimini Wildlife Center Repair its Flight Cages.

A recent major winter storm in the Willamette Valley of Oregon had dire consequences for the Chintimini Wildlife Center.  The storm dropped over a foot of snow on our wildlife rehabilitation flight cages. Two of these essential cages collapsed under the weight of the snow. One is (was) 30 feet long, the other 60 feet. These cages are invaluable to our rehabilitation efforts, and absolutely have to be replaced if we are going to be able to continue our work.

Last year was a record setting year with 1,311 animals admitted (3/4 of them birds), and we expect this year to be even busier, so we need to get these cages replaced or repaired by spring at the latest. We are reaching out to the community to ask for contributions to a fund to help us get these structures back in working order so that we can continue to provide care for Oregon’s injured and orphaned wildlife. 

If you can’t donate (and even if you can), signal boosts are greatly appreciated!

To learn more about Chintimini Wildlife Center, visit them on the web! http://www.chintiminiwildlife.org/

33 round tailed horned lizard skulls found while cleaning out an America Kestrel nest box. “My wife and I have a place in the Chiricahua Mtns of SE Arizona. I have a Kestrel nest box there. This spring the Kestrel pair raised 5 young in the box and after they were through nesting I cleaned out the box to get it ready for next year. The only bones in the box were 33 Round-tailed Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma modestum) skulls, which I placed in my palm and photographed.”
text and photo: John Roser 
(via: San Diego Nat. Hist. Mus. - Herpetology Dept.)

33 round tailed horned lizard skulls found while cleaning out an America Kestrel nest box.

“My wife and I have a place in the Chiricahua Mtns of SE Arizona. I have a Kestrel nest box there. This spring the Kestrel pair raised 5 young in the box and after they were through nesting I cleaned out the box to get it ready for next year. The only bones in the box were 33 Round-tailed Horned Lizard (
Phrynosoma modestum) skulls, which I placed in my palm and photographed.”

text and photo: John Roser

(via: San Diego Nat. Hist. Mus. - Herpetology Dept.)

Chintimini Wildlife Center requests donations for Flynn’s wing surgery!
Flynn is a male American Kestrel. He came to CWC in August 2009. Flynn is unable to be released into the wild due to a wing injury that was unable to heal. Flynn has been a wonderful ambassador for his species since he joined our program.
http://www.chintiminiwildlife.org/falcons.htmRecently Flynn’s wing has settled into a position that is causing damage to his flight feathers and requires reconstruction surgery.The cost of the surgery is $650 and your generous donationswill help Flynn’s wing receive proper care it needs so he can continue to bedelight to behold in our education programs.
Go here to help:  http://flynnsurgery.chipin.com/flynns-surgery
(photo: Angela Calabrese| Flickr)

Chintimini Wildlife Center requests donations for Flynn’s wing surgery!

Flynn is a male American Kestrel. He came to CWC in August 2009. Flynn is unable to be released into the wild due to a wing injury that was unable to heal. Flynn has been a wonderful ambassador for his species since he joined our program.

http://www.chintiminiwildlife.org/falcons.htm

Recently Flynn’s wing has settled into a position that is causing damage to his flight feathers and requires reconstruction surgery.

The cost of the surgery is $650 and your generous donationswill help Flynn’s wing receive proper care it needs so he can continue to bedelight to behold in our education programs.

Go here to help:  http://flynnsurgery.chipin.com/flynns-surgery

(photo: Angela Calabrese| Flickr)


Wildlife Rehab and Education, Houston, TX:  American Kestrel
Fall migration continues as this colorful American kestrel was found sitting on the ground at night. The bird’s rescuer realized that something was not right and brought it in for the night. The next morning she called the Wildlife Center and brought it to the Center. The kestrel was suffering head trauma and damage to a wing. The American kestrel is a small falcon that many gulf coast residents observe during the winter. Kestrels like to sit on power lines and drop down on their prey of rodents and insects. They have been known to hide surplus kills in bushes or cavities to save food for lean times. With the drought this year they may have to work harder to acquire a surplus.
(via: WRE - Facebook)

Wildlife Rehab and Education, Houston, TX:  American Kestrel

Fall migration continues as this colorful American kestrel was found sitting on the ground at night. The bird’s rescuer realized that something was not right and brought it in for the night. The next morning she called the Wildlife Center and brought it to the Center. The kestrel was suffering head trauma and damage to a wing. The American kestrel is a small falcon that many gulf coast residents observe during the winter. Kestrels like to sit on power lines and drop down on their prey of rodents and insects. They have been known to hide surplus kills in bushes or cavities to save food for lean times. With the drought this year they may have to work harder to acquire a surplus.

(via: WRE - Facebook)