Redwood National and State Parks - CA, USA
The rut is almost upon the Roosevelt elk herds within Redwood National and State Park. In this exciting time, the bull elk are rubbing the velvet off their antlers and beginning to seek out and claim herds. This is also the time of year that we hear bugling from competing bulls! Caution is advised since the rutting males can be dangerous and unpredictable. This time of year is also tumultuous for the cows and young, so lots of room should be given to the herd.

The rut is almost upon the Roosevelt elk herds within Redwood National and State Park. In this exciting time, the bull elk are rubbing the velvet off their antlers and beginning to seek out and claim herds. This is also the time of year that we hear bugling from competing bulls!

Caution is advised since the rutting males can be dangerous and unpredictable. This time of year is also tumultuous for the cows and young, so lots of room should be given to the herd.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park, TN, USA
Great Smoky Mountains National Park contains some of the largest tracts of wilderness in the East and is a critical sanctuary for a wide variety of animals. Protected in the park are some 65 species of mammals, over 200 varieties of birds, 67 native fish species, and more than 80 types of reptiles and amphibians.  The symbol of the Smokies, the American Black Bear, is perhaps the most famous resident of the park. Great Smoky Mountains National Park provides the largest protected bear habitat in the East. Though populations are variable, biologists estimate approximately 1,500 bears live in the park, a density of approximately two bears per square mile. Photo: Charlie Choc - www.sharetheexperience.org

(via: U.S. Department of the Interior)

Great Smoky Mountains National Park, TN, USA

Great Smoky Mountains National Park contains some of the largest tracts of wilderness in the East and is a critical sanctuary for a wide variety of animals. Protected in the park are some 65 species of mammals, over 200 varieties of birds, 67 native fish species, and more than 80 types of reptiles and amphibians.

The symbol of the Smokies, the American Black Bear, is perhaps the most famous resident of the park. Great Smoky Mountains National Park provides the largest protected bear habitat in the East. Though populations are variable, biologists estimate approximately 1,500 bears live in the park, a density of approximately two bears per square mile.

Photo: Charlie Choc - www.sharetheexperience.org


mypubliclands

mypubliclands:

Bat Habitat Study Continues in Oregon High Desert 

Does a lactating bat prefer warm rocks or old juniper trees for night roosting? How about a male? These are the types of questions a BLM team of investigators is trying to answer in a three-year research study on bat habitat in the high desert of Central Oregon.

The team, led by BLM Wildlife Habitat Biologist Christopher “Digger” Anthony, just completed field work last month for summer number two at Frederick Butte in Brothers, Oregon.

The research required three different groups from the team: one captured and attached the small transmitters to the Western Long-eared Myotis bats; another hiked to nearby high points with telemetry equipment to track movements on the range; and the final and only day shift processed the data. 

After next year’s final field analysis, Anthony said he hopes the study can fill in some of the knowledge gaps regarding day roosts and habitat selection for bats in juniper woodland environments. 

Visit BLM Oregon’s Flickr site to see more photos from the field: ​http://bit.ly/1ATn4lB .

libutron
libutron:

Mara - Dolichotis sp.
The Maras or Patagonian hares, belonging to the genus Dolichotis, are part of a group of rodents, the Caviidae Family, which includes the cavies and the familiar guinea pigs. Maras are strange animals. Mara’s body resembles a short deer, and the shape of its head is similar to that of the Capybara (member of the same family) but with longer ears.
There are two recognized species of Mara, Dolichotis salinicola (Dwarf Mara), which occurs in Paraguay, Argentina and Bolivia; and Dolichotis patagonum (Patagonian Mara), native to Argentina. The latter is considered a Near Threatened species.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©William Warby | Locality: captive (Whipsnade Zoo, Bedfordshire, England (2014)

libutron:

Mara - Dolichotis sp.

The Maras or Patagonian hares, belonging to the genus Dolichotis, are part of a group of rodents, the Caviidae Family, which includes the cavies and the familiar guinea pigs. Maras are strange animals. Mara’s body resembles a short deer, and the shape of its head is similar to that of the Capybara (member of the same family) but with longer ears.

There are two recognized species of Mara, Dolichotis salinicola (Dwarf Mara), which occurs in Paraguay, Argentina and Bolivia; and Dolichotis patagonum (Patagonian Mara), native to Argentina. The latter is considered a Near Threatened species.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©William Warby | Locality: captive (Whipsnade Zoo, Bedfordshire, England (2014)

Seeing is believing for Florida panthers and bears

You are more likely to see a panther or a black bear today in Florida than someone here 40 years ago. Take a look at these photos to see some panthers and bears spotted recently by people who reported their sightings to us. Florida’s largest land mammals have made a comeback because of conservation efforts in the state.

Thank you to everyone reporting panther and black bear sightings to the FWC! This information helps our biologists with research and management of these species. So if you haven’t already, get involved as a citizen scientist and remember to report your panther or bear sightings!

Full Story: http://ow.ly/AGwla

Report panther sightings: http://ow.ly/AGwsn

Report bear sightings: http://ow.ly/AGwyD

Learn more about panthers at http://www.floridapanthernet.org/ and more about bears at http://myfwc.com/Bear

A list of FWC wildlife sightings, surveys and hotlines that citizen scientists are invited to participate in: http://myfwc.com/get-involved/citizen-science/

(via: Florida Wildlife Commission)

astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Bay Cat (Pardofelis badia)
Also known as the Bornean cat, or Bornean marbled cat, the bay cat is a species of wild cat (Felinae) which is endemic to the island of Borneo, where it is relatively rare. Like many other cat species, bay cats are nocturnal and secretive. Due to this not much is known about bay cat biology and ecology, however they are known to feed on medium sized vertebrates. 
Currently Pardofelis badia is listed as endangered on the IUCN red list as it faces threats from deforestation and habitat destruction.
Classification 
Animalia-Chordata-Mammalia-Carnivora-Feliformia-Felidae-Felinae-Pardofelis-P. badia
Image: Jim Sanderson

astronomy-to-zoology:

Bay Cat (Pardofelis badia)

Also known as the Bornean cat, or Bornean marbled cat, the bay cat is a species of wild cat (Felinae) which is endemic to the island of Borneo, where it is relatively rare. Like many other cat species, bay cats are nocturnal and secretive. Due to this not much is known about bay cat biology and ecology, however they are known to feed on medium sized vertebrates. 

Currently Pardofelis badia is listed as endangered on the IUCN red list as it faces threats from deforestation and habitat destruction.

Classification 

Animalia-Chordata-Mammalia-Carnivora-Feliformia-Felidae-Felinae-Pardofelis-P. badia

Image: Jim Sanderson

Endangered New England Cottontails Released

by Tom Barnes

Yesterday, we took two male juvenile New England cottontails captive bred and raised at Roger Williams Park Zoo to Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge and released them at the hardening pen that helps ease the transition into the wild. They will later be released to Patience Island. Some rabbits will go to Great Bay National Wildlife Refuge in New Hampshire.

This is the only captive rearing program for this species, and one of few captive-rearing program for rabbit species in general. The goal is to eventually release captive-bred cottontails (or following generations on the islands) to boost existing populations or re-introduce to historical areas of the range.

Anyway, here’s some footage we grabbed at the moment of the release, where one rabbit was checking out our GoPro. We’d like to say a big thanks to the zoo, the refuge and our Coastal Program for having us out there!

(via: USFWS - NE Blog)

Moving Back Home Together:

Rarest Native Animals Find Haven on Tribal Lands

by Nate Schweber

FORT BELKNAP AGENCY, Mont. — In the employee directory of the Fort Belknap Reservation, Bronc Speak Thunder’s title is buffalo wrangler.

In 2012, Mr. Speak Thunder drove a livestock trailer in a convoy from Yellowstone National Park that returned genetically pure bison to tribal land in northeastern Montana for the first time in 140 years. Mr. Speak Thunder, 32, is one of a growing number of younger Native Americans who are helping to restore native animals to tribal lands across the Northern Great Plains, in the Dakotas, Montana and parts of Nebraska.

They include people like Robert Goodman, an Oglala Lakota Sioux, who moved away from his reservation in the early 2000s and earned a degree in wildlife management. When he graduated in 2005, he could not find work in that field, so he took a job in construction in Rapid City, S.D…

(read more: NY Times)

photographs by Jonathan Proctor/Defenders of Wildlife

scienceyoucanlove

scienceyoucanlove:

Happy Birthday Patrick the Wombat! This 29 year old is the world’s oldest living wombat (living currently at the Ballarat Wildlife Park in Australia). Given that Patrick has never had children, or any partners in general, probably makes him the oldest living wombat virgin as well! Congrats mate!