libutron
libutron:

Short-clawed Otter | ©Peter Stubbs
The Oriental small-clawed otter, also known as the Asian small-clawed otter, Aonyx cinerea (Carnivora - Mustelidae), is the smallest of the world’s otters.
As well as its size, the Asian short-clawed otter can be distinguished from other otters by its small claws, after which it is named, and the incomplete webbing between digits. These tiny claws, which do not protrude beyond the ends of the fingers, enhance the manual dexterity of this otter as it handles prey.
Aonyx cinerea has a large distribution, ranging from north-western and south-western India, through southern China and the Malay Peninsula, to Sumatra, Java, Borneo and the Riau Archipelago (Indonesia), and Palawan Island in the Philippines.
This species is classified as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List, and listed on Appendix II of CITES.
[Source] 

libutron:

Short-clawed Otter | ©Peter Stubbs

The Oriental small-clawed otter, also known as the Asian small-clawed otter, Aonyx cinerea (Carnivora - Mustelidae), is the smallest of the world’s otters.

As well as its size, the Asian short-clawed otter can be distinguished from other otters by its small claws, after which it is named, and the incomplete webbing between digits. These tiny claws, which do not protrude beyond the ends of the fingers, enhance the manual dexterity of this otter as it handles prey.

Aonyx cinerea has a large distribution, ranging from north-western and south-western India, through southern China and the Malay Peninsula, to Sumatra, Java, Borneo and the Riau Archipelago (Indonesia), and Palawan Island in the Philippines.

This species is classified as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List, and listed on Appendix II of CITES.

[Source

palaeopedia
palaeopedia:

The Hyrax tooth, Hyracodon (1856)
Phylum : ChordataClass : MammaliaOrder : PerissodactylaFamily : HyracodontidaeSubfamily : HyracodontinaeGenus : HyracodonSpecies : H. browni, H. leidyanus, H. medius, H. nebraskensis, H. petersoni
Middle Eocene/late Oligocene (32 - 26 Ma)
1,5 m long and 200 kg
North America
It was a lightly built, pony-like mammal of about 1.5 m long. Hyracodon’s skull was large in comparison to the rest of the body. Hyracodon’s dentition resembled that of later rhinoceroses, but it was a much smaller animal and differed very little in appearance from the primitive horses of which it was a contemporary (32-26 million years ago). It had a short, broad snout and its long, slender limbs had three digits.
Like the primitive horses, hyracodonts inhabited open forests and wooded steppes and turned from browsing foliage to grazing grass. They died out without leaving any descendants and they mark the end of the phylogenetic branch of hornless, running rhinoceroses.
This small, fast-running creature was a close relative of the largest land mammal that ever lived, the 8 m long Paraceratherium.

palaeopedia:

The Hyrax tooth, Hyracodon (1856)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Mammalia
Order : Perissodactyla
Family : Hyracodontidae
Subfamily : Hyracodontinae
Genus : Hyracodon
Species : H. browni, H. leidyanus, H. medius, H. nebraskensis, H. petersoni

  • Middle Eocene/late Oligocene (32 - 26 Ma)
  • 1,5 m long and 200 kg
  • North America

It was a lightly built, pony-like mammal of about 1.5 m long. Hyracodon’s skull was large in comparison to the rest of the body. Hyracodon’s dentition resembled that of later rhinoceroses, but it was a much smaller animal and differed very little in appearance from the primitive horses of which it was a contemporary (32-26 million years ago). It had a short, broad snout and its long, slender limbs had three digits.

Like the primitive horses, hyracodonts inhabited open forests and wooded steppes and turned from browsing foliage to grazing grass. They died out without leaving any descendants and they mark the end of the phylogenetic branch of hornless, running rhinoceroses.

This small, fast-running creature was a close relative of the largest land mammal that ever lived, the 8 m long Paraceratherium.

BIG CAT RESCUE:  Big Cat Playtime!

Cameron the male African Lion and Zabu the female white tiger love each other very much and love “playtime” where they can be very goofy big cats!

Learn more about Big Cat Rescue’s “odd couple” - watch their video bio here: Youtube

* We do not breed our cats at the sanctuary for life in a cage, Cameron was given a vasectomy and Zabu was spayed to prevent them from breeding and producing ligers. You can read more about ligers here: BCR - Ligers

WEBSITE: http://www.bigcatrescue.org

City Lights Threaten Rainforests by Deterring Bats
by Paul Sutherland
Fruit-eating bats play an important role in forest regeneration, collecting and spreading seeds far and wide. However, human development may be stymying bat-mediated dispersal.
In a new study published in the British Ecological Society’s Journal of Applied Ecology, researchers found that fruit bats avoid feeding in light-polluted areas, which may significantly affect forest growth.
Scientists from the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Berlin (IZW), undertook the study in Costa Rica, and focused on Sowell’s short-tailed bats (Carollia sowelli), a species found throughout Central America and Mexico. The findings of their study indicate that artificial lights may deter these bats from feeding on fruit and spreading seeds by 25 to 50 percent…
(read more: MongaBay)
Photograph by Alex Borisenko

City Lights Threaten Rainforests by Deterring Bats

by Paul Sutherland

Fruit-eating bats play an important role in forest regeneration, collecting and spreading seeds far and wide. However, human development may be stymying bat-mediated dispersal.

In a new study published in the British Ecological Society’s Journal of Applied Ecology, researchers found that fruit bats avoid feeding in light-polluted areas, which may significantly affect forest growth.

Scientists from the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Berlin (IZW), undertook the study in Costa Rica, and focused on Sowell’s short-tailed bats (Carollia sowelli), a species found throughout Central America and Mexico. The findings of their study indicate that artificial lights may deter these bats from feeding on fruit and spreading seeds by 25 to 50 percent…

(read more: MongaBay)

Photograph by Alex Borisenko

palaeopedia
palaeopedia:

The Elomeryx (1894)
Phylum : ChordataClass : MammaliaOrder : ArtiodactylaFamily : AnthracotheriidaeSubfamily : BothriodontinaeGenus : ElomeryxSpecies : E. armatus, E. brobonicus, E. cluai, E. crispus, E. garbanii
Middle Eocene/Early Oligocene (42 - 33 Ma)
1,5 m long (size)
Eurasia and North America (map)
Elomeryx is an extinct genus of artiodactyl ungulate, and is among the earliest known anthracotheres. The genus was extremely widespread, first being found in Asia in the middle Eocene, in Europe during the latest Eocene, and having spread to North America by the early Oligocene.
Elomeryx was about 1.5 in body length, and had a long, vaguely horse-like head. It had small tusks which it used to uproot plants, and spoon-shaped incisors ideal for pulling and cropping water plants. Elomeryx had five-toed hind legs and four-toed front legs, resulting in wide feet which made it easier to walk on soft mud. It probably had similar habits to the modern hippopotamus, to which it may have been related.

palaeopedia:

The Elomeryx (1894)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Mammalia
Order : Artiodactyla
Family : Anthracotheriidae
Subfamily : Bothriodontinae
Genus : Elomeryx
Species : E. armatus, E. brobonicus, E. cluai, E. crispus, E. garbanii

  • Middle Eocene/Early Oligocene (42 - 33 Ma)
  • 1,5 m long (size)
  • Eurasia and North America (map)

Elomeryx is an extinct genus of artiodactyl ungulate, and is among the earliest known anthracotheres. The genus was extremely widespread, first being found in Asia in the middle Eocene, in Europe during the latest Eocene, and having spread to North America by the early Oligocene.

Elomeryx was about 1.5 in body length, and had a long, vaguely horse-like head. It had small tusks which it used to uproot plants, and spoon-shaped incisors ideal for pulling and cropping water plants. Elomeryx had five-toed hind legs and four-toed front legs, resulting in wide feet which made it easier to walk on soft mud. It probably had similar habits to the modern hippopotamus, to which it may have been related.

palaeopedia
palaeopedia:

Near the horn beast, Paraceratherium (1911)or Indricotherium (Indric beast)/Baluchitherium (beast of Baluchistan)
Phylum : ChordataClass : MammaliaOrder : PerissodactylaFamily : HyracodontidaeSubfamily : IndricotherinaeGenus : ParaceratheriumSpecies : P. bugtiense, P. transouralicum, P. prohorovi, P. orgosensis, P. zhajremensis
Oligocene (38 - 20,4 Ma)
9,5 m long and 15 000 kg (size)
Pakistan, Mongolia and western China (map)

Ever since its scattered, oversized remains were discovered in the early 20th century, Indricotherium has occasioned controversy among paleontologists, who have named this giant mammal not once, but three times—Indricotherium, Paraceratherium and Baluchitherium have all been in common usage, with the first two currently battling it out for supremacy. (For the record, Paraceratherium seems to have won the race among paleontologists, but Indricotherium is still preferred by the general public—and may yet wind up being assigned to a separate, but similar, genus.)
Whatever you choose to call it, Indricotherium was, hands-down, the largest terrestrial mammal that ever lived, approaching the size of the giant sauropod dinosaurs that preceded it by over a hundred million years. An ancestor of the modern rhinoceros, the 15-to-20-ton Indricotherium had a relatively long neck (though nothing approaching what you’d see on a Diplodocus or Brachiosaurus) and surprisingly thin legs with three-toed feet, which years ago used to be portrayed as elephant-like stumps. The fossil evidence is lacking, but this huge herbivore probably possessed a prehensile upper lip—not quite a trunk, but an appendage flexible enough to allow it to grab and tear the tall leaves of trees.
To date, fossils of Indricotherium have only been found in the central and eastern parts of Eurasia, but it’s possible that this gigantic mammal also stomped across the plains of western Europe and (conceivably) other continents as well during the Oligocene epoch. Classified as a “hyrocodont” mammal, one of its closest relatives was the much smaller (only about 500 pound) Hyracodon, a distant North American anecstor of the modern rhinoceros.

palaeopedia:

Near the horn beast, Paraceratherium (1911)
or Indricotherium (Indric beast)/Baluchitherium (beast of Baluchistan)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Mammalia
Order : Perissodactyla
Family : Hyracodontidae
Subfamily : Indricotherinae
Genus : Paraceratherium
Species : P. bugtiense, P. transouralicum, P. prohorovi, P. orgosensis, P. zhajremensis

  • Oligocene (38 - 20,4 Ma)
  • 9,5 m long and 15 000 kg (size)
  • Pakistan, Mongolia and western China (map)

Ever since its scattered, oversized remains were discovered in the early 20th century, Indricotherium has occasioned controversy among paleontologists, who have named this giant mammal not once, but three times—Indricotherium, Paraceratherium and Baluchitherium have all been in common usage, with the first two currently battling it out for supremacy. (For the record, Paraceratherium seems to have won the race among paleontologists, but Indricotherium is still preferred by the general public—and may yet wind up being assigned to a separate, but similar, genus.)

Whatever you choose to call it, Indricotherium was, hands-down, the largest terrestrial mammal that ever lived, approaching the size of the giant sauropod dinosaurs that preceded it by over a hundred million years. An ancestor of the modern rhinoceros, the 15-to-20-ton Indricotherium had a relatively long neck (though nothing approaching what you’d see on a Diplodocus or Brachiosaurus) and surprisingly thin legs with three-toed feet, which years ago used to be portrayed as elephant-like stumps. The fossil evidence is lacking, but this huge herbivore probably possessed a prehensile upper lip—not quite a trunk, but an appendage flexible enough to allow it to grab and tear the tall leaves of trees.

To date, fossils of Indricotherium have only been found in the central and eastern parts of Eurasia, but it’s possible that this gigantic mammal also stomped across the plains of western Europe and (conceivably) other continents as well during the Oligocene epoch. Classified as a “hyrocodont” mammal, one of its closest relatives was the much smaller (only about 500 pound) Hyracodon, a distant North American anecstor of the modern rhinoceros.

Trouble for Panthers in Florida

Attempts are being made in Florida to place a disposal well for oil and gas waste right next door to the only refuge for Florida’s last 100 panthers AND close to drinking water supplies. This kind of poorly regulated toxic dumping ground would pose a serious threat to both panthers and people.

More here: EPA should protect the endangered Florida panther, not oil and gas profits

* NRDC BioGems Defenders take collective action to protect wildlife and our last wild places. Join us by liking us at www.facebook.com/BioGemsDefenders

Scientists Discover Majestic New Cat Species (Well… Subspecies) in Nepal
by Stephen Messenger
Researchers studying snow leopard populations high in the Himalayas have announced the accidental discovery of a cat previously unknown to Nepal — a majestic little cat that’s at home in the highest mountain range on Earth.
The small feline, about the same size as a domestic house cat, was caught on film by various camera traps between 13,000 and 15,000 feet above sea level. On 11 occasions between 2012 and 2013, the cat was spotted prowling the rocky mountainside at night in search of food…
(read more: TheDodo.com)

Scientists Discover Majestic New Cat Species (Well… Subspecies) in Nepal

by Stephen Messenger

Researchers studying snow leopard populations high in the Himalayas have announced the accidental discovery of a cat previously unknown to Nepal — a majestic little cat that’s at home in the highest mountain range on Earth.

The small feline, about the same size as a domestic house cat, was caught on film by various camera traps between 13,000 and 15,000 feet above sea level. On 11 occasions between 2012 and 2013, the cat was spotted prowling the rocky mountainside at night in search of food…

(read more: TheDodo.com)

FL Native Wildlife Spotlight:  Eastern Chipmunk

How much food can a chipmunk stuff into its cheeks? The cute, furry striped rodent can gather as much as time allows before it senses some predator and scurries off to stash the food in its burrow system, from which it rarely ranges more than 50 feet away.

Chipmunks seem to spend their life scurrying, from their eagerness to leave the nest, to finding a home for themselves and reproducing before they die, which happens in less than two years, according to outside sources from around the eastern United States.

The Florida native is found mostly in the five western-most Panhandle counties, in upland hardwood forests near water. Because we classify this teacup-sized creature as a species of special concern, we want to know if you have seen one, where and when. People have recorded 150 so far at MY FWC.

For more information:

Profile  and  Status

Video: Youtube  and  Audio: National Geo

(via: Florida Wildlife Commission)

More bad news for bats :/
 White-nose syndrome (WNS), the deadly disease that has killed millions of bats since 2006, has spread to Michigan and Wisconsin. Bats are incredibly valuable, and the decimation of bat populations by WNS has far-reaching ecological consequences. Worldwide, bats play essential roles as pollinators, seed dispersers, and primary consumers of insects.  The USGS confirmed the new diagnoses. Learn more about WNS at http://on.doi.gov/1fEAFFG, and read today’s news at http://bit.ly/1hEs9Si.Photo: Nancy Heaslip, USGS
(via: U.S. Geological Survey)

More bad news for bats :/

White-nose syndrome (WNS), the deadly disease that has killed millions of bats since 2006, has spread to Michigan and Wisconsin.

Bats are incredibly valuable, and the decimation of bat populations by WNS has far-reaching ecological consequences. Worldwide, bats play essential roles as pollinators, seed dispersers, and primary consumers of insects.

The USGS confirmed the new diagnoses. Learn more about WNS at http://on.doi.gov/1fEAFFG, and read today’s news at http://bit.ly/1hEs9Si.

Photo: Nancy Heaslip, USGS

(via: U.S. Geological Survey)

On Far-Flung Wrangel Island,A Scientist Sizes up Muskoxen
by Joel Berger, Wildlife Conservation Soc.
My mission is to train my Russian colleagues in the use of photo-grammetry, a technique that, in this instance, will use photoimaging to understand the precise body-size proportions of muskoxen and their calves.
That information will help us determine how the Wrangel Island population is faring in comparison with the populations I have studied in Arctic Alaska, a region warming faster than northeastern Siberia. I will provide my Russian colleagues with some basic photogrammetry equipment — a camera, computer, laser rangefinder, and lenses — enabling them to establish baseline physiological data for muskoxen and some other Arctic mammals.
My goal is to understand how different factors affect growth in individual muskoxen. To get sufficiently accurate measurements of the heads and profiles of muskoxen from photographs, we need to get within 50 m of our Wrangel subjects — any closer might provoke a stampede…
(read more: Environment360 - Yale Univ.)
photo by Joel Berger

On Far-Flung Wrangel Island,A Scientist Sizes up Muskoxen

by Joel Berger, Wildlife Conservation Soc.

My mission is to train my Russian colleagues in the use of photo-grammetry, a technique that, in this instance, will use photoimaging to understand the precise body-size proportions of muskoxen and their calves.

That information will help us determine how the Wrangel Island population is faring in comparison with the populations I have studied in Arctic Alaska, a region warming faster than northeastern Siberia. I will provide my Russian colleagues with some basic photogrammetry equipment — a camera, computer, laser rangefinder, and lenses — enabling them to establish baseline physiological data for muskoxen and some other Arctic mammals.

My goal is to understand how different factors affect growth in individual muskoxen. To get sufficiently accurate measurements of the heads and profiles of muskoxen from photographs, we need to get within 50 m of our Wrangel subjects — any closer might provoke a stampede…

(read more: Environment360 - Yale Univ.)

photo by Joel Berger

Help Give Bison Room to Roam… Safely
Right now as spring arrives, bison in Yellowstone National Park can be harassed, corralled and slaughtered when they wander out of park boundaries in search of food.
But a critical new plan would help bison by opening more than 400,000 acres of public lands outside of Yellowstone for the wild bison to roam freely—and after years of hard work, just one more approval is needed to provide bison more room to roam!
Help give Yellowstone bison more room to safely roam by editing and sending a message to the Montana Board of Livestock, telling them to agree to the expanded habitat plan…
(sign the petition: National Wildlife Federation)

Help Give Bison Room to Roam… Safely

Right now as spring arrives, bison in Yellowstone National Park can be harassed, corralled and slaughtered when they wander out of park boundaries in search of food.

But a critical new plan would help bison by opening more than 400,000 acres of public lands outside of Yellowstone for the wild bison to roam freely—and after years of hard work, just one more approval is needed to provide bison more room to roam!

Help give Yellowstone bison more room to safely roam by editing and sending a message to the Montana Board of Livestock, telling them to agree to the expanded habitat plan…

(sign the petition: National Wildlife Federation)

Tasmania tiger relative more like a quoll
by Signe Cane
Tasmanian tiger’s ancient relative had more powerful jaws than its size would suggest
UNLIKE THE TASMANIAN tiger, whose relatively weak jaw strength meant it was better suited to hunting small animals, an ancient relative was capable of taking down prey larger than itself.
Australian researchers have discovered that, Dickson’s thylacine (Nimbacinus dicksoni), an ancient cousin of the Tasmanian tiger, had a powerful bite capable of subduing much larger prey than its own body weight.
"The biomechanical performance of Nimbacinus is more similar to that of dasyurids - such as quolls - than of thylacinids. That would suggest it hunted a large variety of prey,” says zoologist Marie Attard from the University of New England in Armidale.
"In contrast, the iconic Tasmanian tiger was considerably more specialised than large living dasyurids and Nimbacinus, and was likely more restricted in the range of prey it could hunt, making it more vulnerable to extinction,” says Marie…
(read more: Australian Geographic)
Illustration of Mid Miocene N. dicksoni. Image Credit: Anne Musser

Tasmania tiger relative more like a quoll

by Signe Cane

Tasmanian tiger’s ancient relative had more powerful jaws than its size would suggest

UNLIKE THE TASMANIAN tiger, whose relatively weak jaw strength meant it was better suited to hunting small animals, an ancient relative was capable of taking down prey larger than itself.

Australian researchers have discovered that, Dickson’s thylacine (Nimbacinus dicksoni), an ancient cousin of the Tasmanian tiger, had a powerful bite capable of subduing much larger prey than its own body weight.

"The biomechanical performance of Nimbacinus is more similar to that of dasyurids - such as quolls - than of thylacinids. That would suggest it hunted a large variety of prey,” says zoologist Marie Attard from the University of New England in Armidale.

"In contrast, the iconic Tasmanian tiger was considerably more specialised than large living dasyurids and Nimbacinus, and was likely more restricted in the range of prey it could hunt, making it more vulnerable to extinction,” says Marie…

(read more: Australian Geographic)

Illustration of Mid Miocene N. dicksoni. Image Credit: Anne Musser