elijahshandseight

chalkandwater:

Mantis shrimp have divided into two distinct groups based on weaponry. 

Smashers have developed hard clubs that they use to crack open hard-shelled prey, while Spearers have long and sharp spines at the tip of their claws for spearing their prey. Both use their weapons with lightning speed, showing that their nickname, “thumb splitters”, is well-earned.

[video]

“But it didn’t really make sense,” according to doctoral research student Hanne Thoen at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, “as you really don’t need that many photoreceptors to see color and discriminate well.”

It’s a lovely thought that a glass-punching, rainbow-colored crustacean could have sensory and aesthetic capabilities beyond our wildest dreams. Yet mathematical models predict that even a so-called “ideal system” for color vision would need no more than seven photoreceptors, tops. Beyond the questionable “need” for twelve photoreceptors, “such a large number of photoreceptors would also require a large amount of processing power” for a shrimp brain to encode color like the rest of the animal kingdom—a brain whose complexity we are only beginning to explore, Thoen said…

Study finds mantis shrimp process vision differently than other organisms (w/ video) (Phys.org) —Researchers with the University of Queensland, Brisbane along with an associate from National Cheng Kung University, in China have found what they believe to be a reasonable explanation for mantis shrimp having 12 photoreceptors in their eyes. 
In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes a study they conducted where shrimp were trained to respond to different colors, which led to the discovery that despite more receptors than most other organisms, they are less able to discriminate between different colors—a finding that indicates they process colors in a different way. Michael Land and Daniel Osorio offer a Perspective piece on the researchers efforts in the same journal issue.
Scientists have known for many years that mantis shrimp have more photoreceptors than most other organisms, but have not, until now, been able to come up with a reason why. The assumption had been that the creatures had some special vision abilities that allowed them to see things that others could not. In this new effort, it appears that the large numbers of receptors adds a speed advantage rather than visual enhancement…
(read more)Image: Roy L. Caldwell

Study finds mantis shrimp process vision differently than other organisms (w/ video)

(Phys.org) —Researchers with the University of Queensland, Brisbane along with an associate from National Cheng Kung University, in China have found what they believe to be a reasonable explanation for mantis shrimp having 12 photoreceptors in their eyes.

In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes a study they conducted where shrimp were trained to respond to different colors, which led to the discovery that despite more receptors than most other organisms, they are less able to discriminate between different colors—a finding that indicates they process colors in a different way. Michael Land and Daniel Osorio offer a Perspective piece on the researchers efforts in the same journal issue.

Scientists have known for many years that mantis shrimp have more photoreceptors than most other organisms, but have not, until now, been able to come up with a reason why. The assumption had been that the creatures had some special vision abilities that allowed them to see things that others could not. In this new effort, it appears that the large numbers of receptors adds a speed advantage rather than visual enhancement…

(read more)

Image: Roy L. Caldwell

Mantis Shrimp:
Just saw your post and I figured I would share this picture with you! My crew and I got these when we were sampling with the SUNY Stony Brook Trawl in the Long Island sound! :3
Paxon:
Oh awesome, wow. He’s beautiful! This looks like my old friend Squilla empusa.
http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/arthropoda/crustacea/malacostraca/eumalacostraca/royslist/species.php?name=s_empusa

Mantis Shrimp:

Just saw your post and I figured I would share this picture with you! My crew and I got these when we were sampling with the SUNY Stony Brook Trawl in the Long Island sound! :3

Paxon:

Oh awesome, wow. He’s beautiful! This looks like my old friend Squilla empusa.

http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/arthropoda/crustacea/malacostraca/eumalacostraca/royslist/species.php?name=s_empusa

mucholderthen

mucholderthen:

BEAUTIFUL SHRIMP (continued from my previous post of Guerra illustrations)

[1] Dark mantis shrimpNeogonodactylus curacaoensis 

[2] Rock mantis shrimp – Neogonodactylus oerstedii 

[3] Caribbean Striped Mantis ShrimpLysiosquillina glabriuscula

[4] Ghost shrimp – Neocallichirus cacahuate

[5] Spotted cleaner shrimp – Periclimenes yucatanicus

Taxonomic Illustrations of Shrimp
by Alberto Guerra  [ albertoguerra ] - Yucatan (Mexico)
Digital art created with Photoshop CS6 & Wacom tablet
© BDMY - Biodiversidad Marina de Yucatán / UNAM Sisal

Absurd Creature of the Week:

Ferocious, Fearless Mantis Shrimp Is the Honey Badger of the Sea

by Matt Simon

These are the stomatopods, some 550 known species of mantis shrimp that range from less than an inch long to well over a foot. They’re feisty, beautifully complex creatures that strike so quickly that they momentarily superheat the water around their spring-loaded clubs to a temperature nearly as hot as the surface of the sun.

They may not be particularly big, but they will fight just about anything that so much as looks at them funny. Octopuses, humans, each other — you name it. You see, the mantis shrimp doesn’t grab ass. It kicks it.

Mantis shrimp are split into two groups. Smashers methodically dismember and knock their prey unconscious. Spearers impale fish with spikey appendages, much like their insect namesake. The speed and power with which these creatures strike simply defies logic. While the spearers can lash at their prey in a mere 20 to 30 milliseconds, the smashers can be 10 times as quick. This is the fastest predatory strike on the planet…

(read more: Wired Science)

amazing motherfucking photos by Roy Caldwell

montereybayaquarium
montereybayaquarium:

Peacock Mantis Shrimp — He’s Baaaaack!
Tiny, deadly and gorgeous. That’s the peacock mantis shrimp, and we just placed one on exhibit in our Splash Zone galleries.
You’ll have to work a bit to see it. It’s housed — alone — in a small aquarium inside the Coral Crawl tunnel in Splash Zone. But it’s well worth the effort!
This is the first time we’ve hosted a  mantis shrimp since 2001 when one of them stowed away inside some coral rock and earned us international headlines and live CNN coverage. (There’s something compelling about a “killer shrimp” terrorizing other animals in the children’s area of an internationally known aquarium.)
They pack quite a punch
Since then, we’ve been wary of deliberately introducing a mantis shrimp — and for good reason. Aquarists and scuba divers refer to them as “thumb-splitters” because their claws pack a punch as powerful as a .22-caliber bullet.
Those same claws can shatter a clam shell, and crack open a crab or shatter glass. They can bring down a blue-ringed octopus or a fish. The claws are made of a material so hard it can deliver 50,000 blows between molts - without breaking. It’s being studied by scientists as a model for crafting super-strong body armor for soldiers.
And it moves its claws so fast that they turn water into plasma and sound into light.
Amazing!
“A thermonuclear bomb of light and beauty”
But that’s not the end of the story, as celebrated cartoonist Matthew Inman of The Oatmeal explains in his online love-letter, “Why the mantis shrimp is my new favorite animal.”
He starts by examining the eyes that make them unbelievably effective hunters. Their vision is so sensitive that a mantis shrimp can see in both infrared and ultraviolet spectra, and uses 16 color receptor cones (compared to just three for humans).
Inman observes: “Where we see a rainbow, the mantis shrimp sees a thermonuclear bomb of light and beauty.”
It’s that combination of experiencing a world of transcendent beauty — and then turning around and pounding its prey to smithereens — that fascinates Matthew Inman.
We hope you’ll be fascinated, too, at the chance to see a peacock mantis shrimp face to face — on the other side of shatterproof acrylic.

montereybayaquarium:

Peacock Mantis Shrimp — He’s Baaaaack!

Tiny, deadly and gorgeous. That’s the peacock mantis shrimp, and we just placed one on exhibit in our Splash Zone galleries.

You’ll have to work a bit to see it. It’s housed — alone — in a small aquarium inside the Coral Crawl tunnel in Splash Zone. But it’s well worth the effort!

This is the first time we’ve hosted a  mantis shrimp since 2001 when one of them stowed away inside some coral rock and earned us international headlines and live CNN coverage. (There’s something compelling about a “killer shrimp” terrorizing other animals in the children’s area of an internationally known aquarium.)

They pack quite a punch

Since then, we’ve been wary of deliberately introducing a mantis shrimp — and for good reason. Aquarists and scuba divers refer to them as “thumb-splitters” because their claws pack a punch as powerful as a .22-caliber bullet.

Those same claws can shatter a clam shell, and crack open a crab or shatter glass. They can bring down a blue-ringed octopus or a fish. The claws are made of a material so hard it can deliver 50,000 blows between molts - without breaking. It’s being studied by scientists as a model for crafting super-strong body armor for soldiers.

And it moves its claws so fast that they turn water into plasma and sound into light.

Amazing!

“A thermonuclear bomb of light and beauty”

But that’s not the end of the story, as celebrated cartoonist Matthew Inman of The Oatmeal explains in his online love-letter, “Why the mantis shrimp is my new favorite animal.”

He starts by examining the eyes that make them unbelievably effective hunters. Their vision is so sensitive that a mantis shrimp can see in both infrared and ultraviolet spectra, and uses 16 color receptor cones (compared to just three for humans).

Inman observes: “Where we see a rainbow, the mantis shrimp sees a thermonuclear bomb of light and beauty.”

It’s that combination of experiencing a world of transcendent beauty — and then turning around and pounding its prey to smithereens  that fascinates Matthew Inman.

We hope you’ll be fascinated, too, at the chance to see a peacock mantis shrimp face to face — on the other side of shatterproof acrylic.

How ‘Smashing’ & ‘Spearing’ Shrimp Speedily Attack Prey 
by Douglas Main
Spearing mantis shrimp hide in their burrows and wait for an unsuspecting creature to come along. Then, in the blink of an eye, they spear it with their long claws, like an underwater archer. How do they spear their prey so quickly?
Maya deVries, a researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, compared the attack of the spearing shrimp with its relative, the “smasher” shrimp. Both animals are able to unleash quick attacks with a strange spring and latch system that stores up energy in their muscles and releases it in an instant. It’s like a bow and arrow, she said.
Unexpectedly, she found that smasher mantis shrimp can move much more quickly than the spearing variety, which is the opposite of what was expected. The smashers, she found, need quick speeds to produce enough force to crack the shells of their prey, such as crabs and other shellfish. The spearing shrimp, on the other hand, only needs to move slightly faster than their prey, she said…
(read more: LiveScience)                        (photo: Roy Caldwell/UC Berkeley)

How ‘Smashing’ & ‘Spearing’ Shrimp Speedily Attack Prey

by Douglas Main

Spearing mantis shrimp hide in their burrows and wait for an unsuspecting creature to come along. Then, in the blink of an eye, they spear it with their long claws, like an underwater archer. How do they spear their prey so quickly?

Maya deVries, a researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, compared the attack of the spearing shrimp with its relative, the “smasher” shrimp. Both animals are able to unleash quick attacks with a strange spring and latch system that stores up energy in their muscles and releases it in an instant. It’s like a bow and arrow, she said.

Unexpectedly, she found that smasher mantis shrimp can move much more quickly than the spearing variety, which is the opposite of what was expected. The smashers, she found, need quick speeds to produce enough force to crack the shells of their prey, such as crabs and other shellfish. The spearing shrimp, on the other hand, only needs to move slightly faster than their prey, she said…

(read more: LiveScience)                        (photo: Roy Caldwell/UC Berkeley)

ichthyologist

ichthyologist:

World’s fastest punch vaporizes water

The Peacock mantis shrimp (Odontodactylus scyllarus) is capable of firing its clubbed claws at over 80 km/h (50 mph), with an acceleration similar to a .22 caliber bullet. The shrimp uses its club both for defense and offense, and can generate 90 kg (200 pounds) of force. The strike is so fast, it boils surrounding water, creating cavitation bubbles that immediately collapse under water pressure, striking the prey a second time. The collapsing bubble also creates a short lived flash of light and temperatures of several thousand kelvin.

Gifs are made from this BBC YouTube video:

Fastest animals on Earth in slow motion - Animal Camera - BBC

Credit goes to BBC