Chesapeake Bay almost rid of invasive nutria

When they feed, nutria damage or destroy the root mat that binds the marsh together. When this fibrous root network is lost, marshlands are quickly reduced to unconsolidated mudflats. These areas, in turn, are highly susceptible to erosion and are eventually converted to open water. This downward spiraling not only harms the marsh but the wildlife that depend on them.

In a 2004 economic study commissioned by the Maryland DNR, Southwick Associates reported that, without decisive action, more than 35,000 acres of Chesapeake Bay marshes could be destroyed by nutria in 50 years

Down in the Chesapeake Bay, we’ve made great progress to get rid of the exotic, invasive nutria rodent. So well that we invited our regional agency leadership from Massachusetts down for a  tour of Chesapeake Bay marshes and a demonstration of nutria eradication methods…

(read more: USFWS NE Region)

photos by USFWS

Nutria in Texas (and the United States)

by TPWD staff

The Nutria is a large, semi-aquatic exotic rodent that has created problems for coastal marsh and bald cypress swamps in Texas. Nutria populations have swelled in recent years due to the collapse of the fur trade industry (for which they were originally bred during the first half of the twentieth century).

These pesky rodents feed on planted seedlings and saplings, and have consequently denuded hundreds of thousands of acres of marshlands and floodplains along the Gulf Coast. Efforts to regenerate destroyed regions have been futile, as nutria have been observed to decimate replanted vegetation even further…

(read more: Texas Parks and Wildlife Dept.)

(photos: T - jennrich | Flickr; B - Arman Werth | Flickr)

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USGS paper about Worldwide introductions of Nutria:

http://www.nwrc.usgs.gov/special/nutria/index.htm

bullshit-bullsharks
bullshit-bullsharks: NUTRIA

 This, my friends, is a Nutria, or Coypu (Myocastor coypus). They have webbed feet, and find themselves more agile in water than on land. I mean if I could stay submerged in water for 5 minutes, I’d love it too! They enjoy water so much, their burrows are always near it. They have two to three litters a year, each consisting of five to seven young. Copyu learn to leave their mothers fairly quick, a month after birth, to live on their on. Nutria  tend to feast on aquatic plants or roots, but will also go for mussels, snails, and other small creatures. They used to only inhabit South America, but as their lush fur undercoat became popular in fur trade, they were transported world wide. Now they’re domesticated purely for fur animals, and can be found basically everywhere. 
Photo credits: NDomer73

bullshit-bullsharks: NUTRIA

This, my friends, is a Nutria, or Coypu (Myocastor coypus). They have webbed feet, and find themselves more agile in water than on land. I mean if I could stay submerged in water for 5 minutes, I’d love it too! They enjoy water so much, their burrows are always near it. They have two to three litters a year, each consisting of five to seven young. Copyu learn to leave their mothers fairly quick, a month after birth, to live on their on. Nutria  tend to feast on aquatic plants or roots, but will also go for mussels, snails, and other small creatures. They used to only inhabit South America, but as their lush fur undercoat became popular in fur trade, they were transported world wide. Now they’re domesticated purely for fur animals, and can be found basically everywhere. 

Photo credits: NDomer73

Nutria (Myocastor coypus)

utria are large, web-footed rodents that are more agile in the water than on land. They live in burrows, or nests, never far from the water. Nutria may inhabit a riverbank or lakeshore, or dwell in the midst of wetlands. They are strong swimmers and can remain submerged for as long as five minutes.
Nutria (also called coypu) are varied eaters, most fond of aquatic plants and roots. They also feast on small creatures such as snails or mussels.
Nutria can be rather social animals and sometimes live in large colonies, reproducing prolifically. Females have two or three litters every year, each consisting of five to seven young. These animals mature quickly and remain with their mothers for only a month or two. In some areas, booming nutria populations have become troublesome as the animals develop a taste for farm fare…
(read more: National Geo)     (photo: Robert Caputo)

Nutria (Myocastor coypus)

utria are large, web-footed rodents that are more agile in the water than on land. They live in burrows, or nests, never far from the water. Nutria may inhabit a riverbank or lakeshore, or dwell in the midst of wetlands. They are strong swimmers and can remain submerged for as long as five minutes.

Nutria (also called coypu) are varied eaters, most fond of aquatic plants and roots. They also feast on small creatures such as snails or mussels.

Nutria can be rather social animals and sometimes live in large colonies, reproducing prolifically. Females have two or three litters every year, each consisting of five to seven young. These animals mature quickly and remain with their mothers for only a month or two. In some areas, booming nutria populations have become troublesome as the animals develop a taste for farm fare…

(read more: National Geo)     (photo: Robert Caputo)