North American Field Crickets
Summer nights are filled with the sound of field crickets (family Gryllidae). 
Many species are so visually similar they are best identified by their chirps. The sound is produced by rubbing the sharp edge of one forewing (usually the right one) against rough teeth spaced along a vein on the other; only males have these structures. 
Females have special “eardrums” on their forelegs called tympanum, with which they detect the calls of males. Female crickets can be distinguished from males by the presence of an ovipositor that they lay eggs under the soil with - males have only two appendages on the abdomen, while females have three (the long central one is the ovipositor; this is a female). 
Field crickets are omnivorous, feeding on seeds, fruit, and small insects, including the eggs of other invertebrates.photo by Mr.TinDC on Flickr
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

North American Field Crickets

Summer nights are filled with the sound of field crickets (family Gryllidae).

Many species are so visually similar they are best identified by their chirps. The sound is produced by rubbing the sharp edge of one forewing (usually the right one) against rough teeth spaced along a vein on the other; only males have these structures.

Females have special “eardrums” on their forelegs called tympanum, with which they detect the calls of males. Female crickets can be distinguished from males by the presence of an ovipositor that they lay eggs under the soil with - males have only two appendages on the abdomen, while females have three (the long central one is the ovipositor; this is a female).

Field crickets are omnivorous, feeding on seeds, fruit, and small insects, including the eggs of other invertebrates.

photo by Mr.TinDC on Flickr

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

While messing around with the Celebrity Tomatoes, I came across this little fellow, who appears in my garden every year around this time, an Obscure Bird Grasshopper (Schistocerca obscura), Houston, TX, USA. I kept seeing him around for the next few days, in different locations.

http://ninnescahlife.wichita.edu/node/705

http://bugguide.net/node/view/5009

http://www.austinbug.com/larvalbug/beast/archbeast9-09.html

Greater Arid Land Katydid (Neobarrettia spinosa) 
Also referred to as the “Predaceous Katydid” and the “Red-Eyed Devil”. 
http://bugguide.net/node/view/35532
This critter was encountered at our Headquarters building in Bandera, TX,  and was doing its very best to prevent us from entering the building! Little bitty bug with a gigantic attitude! 
Check out this paper about songbird nest predation by this species of katydid… here.
(via: Hill Country State Natural Area - Texas Parks and Wildlife)

Greater Arid Land Katydid (Neobarrettia spinosa)

Also referred to as the “Predaceous Katydid” and the “Red-Eyed Devil”.

http://bugguide.net/node/view/35532

This critter was encountered at our Headquarters building in Bandera, TX,  and was doing its very best to prevent us from entering the building! Little bitty bug with a gigantic attitude!

Check out this paper about songbird nest predation by this species of katydid… here.

(via: Hill Country State Natural Area - Texas Parks and Wildlife)

A pink color phase Oblong-winged Katydid (Amblycorypha oblongifolia) alights on a palmetto frond, Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge, FL, USA. This species comes in 3 color phases: green, tan, and pink. Pink being the rarest of the color phases. (phase does not refer to a period of time, but a color variety, as the color is life long.)
Photo by Jenny/Creative Commons
(via: USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System)

A pink color phase Oblong-winged Katydid (Amblycorypha oblongifolia) alights on a palmetto frond, Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge, FL, USA. This species comes in 3 color phases: green, tan, and pink. Pink being the rarest of the color phases. (phase does not refer to a period of time, but a color variety, as the color is life long.)

Photo by Jenny/Creative Commons

(via: USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System)

Newly discovered insect ‘Supersonus’ hits animal kingdom’s highest-pitch love call
via: University of Lincoln
In the rainforests of South America, scientists have discovered a new genus and three new species of katydid with the highest ultrasonic calling songs ever recorded in the animal kingdom. The insects have lost the ability of flight due to their reduced wing size, so the adoption of extreme ultrasonic frequencies might play a role in avoiding predators, such as bats.
Katydids (or bushcrickets) are insects known for their acoustic communication, with the male producing sound by rubbing its wings together (stridulation) to attract distant females for mating.
Scientists from the universities of Lincoln, Strathclyde and Toronto located a new genus with three new species of katydid in the rainforests of Colombia and Ecuador…
(read more: Science Alert)

Newly discovered insect ‘Supersonus’ hits animal kingdom’s highest-pitch love call

via: University of Lincoln

In the rainforests of South America, scientists have discovered a new genus and three new species of katydid with the highest ultrasonic calling songs ever recorded in the animal kingdom. The insects have lost the ability of flight due to their reduced wing size, so the adoption of extreme ultrasonic frequencies might play a role in avoiding predators, such as bats.

Katydids (or bushcrickets) are insects known for their acoustic communication, with the male producing sound by rubbing its wings together (stridulation) to attract distant females for mating.

Scientists from the universities of Lincoln, Strathclyde and Toronto located a new genus with three new species of katydid in the rainforests of Colombia and Ecuador…

(read more: Science Alert)

astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Genus: Macroxiphus
Macroxiphus is a genus of unusual katydids (Tettigoniidae) that are distributed throughout South East Asia and Micronesia. Members of Macroxiphus are unique in that their larvae are exceptional ant mimics, and use their mimicry to trick potential predators into thinking they are harmful ants. Macroxiphus spp. will lose this disguise as they move on into adulthood.
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Orthoptera-Ensifera-Tettigoniidea-Tettigonioidea-Tettigoniidae-Macroxiphus
Image: Muhammad Mahdi Karim

astronomy-to-zoology:

Genus: Macroxiphus

Macroxiphus is a genus of unusual katydids (Tettigoniidae) that are distributed throughout South East Asia and Micronesia. Members of Macroxiphus are unique in that their larvae are exceptional ant mimics, and use their mimicry to trick potential predators into thinking they are harmful ants. Macroxiphus spp. will lose this disguise as they move on into adulthood.

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Orthoptera-Ensifera-Tettigoniidea-Tettigonioidea-Tettigoniidae-Macroxiphus

Image: Muhammad Mahdi Karim

libutron
libutron:

Elegant Grasshopper - Zonocerus elegans | ©LAMPSHELL   (Timbavati Nature Reserve, South Africa)
This striking colored African grasshopper, Zonocerus elegans (Orthoptera - Pyrgomorphidae), reaches up to 50 mm in length, and may or may not have fully developed wings. The head is black with yellow spots and stripes, orange eyes, and antennae alternately striped in black and orange. The prothorax is blue-grey with yellow endings, and the abdomen is striped in yellow, black and blue. The wings are mostly reddish.
This aposematic coloring advertise the unpleasant smell, and presumably taste, of the body of this grasshopper [1].
The elegant grasshopper, Zonocerus elegans, occurs in large numbers in Kilosa district, in Tanzania, during the dry season June to January and attacks a wide range of wild and crop plants [2].

libutron:

Elegant Grasshopper - Zonocerus elegans | ©LAMPSHELL   (Timbavati Nature Reserve, South Africa)

This striking colored African grasshopper, Zonocerus elegans (Orthoptera - Pyrgomorphidae), reaches up to 50 mm in length, and may or may not have fully developed wings. The head is black with yellow spots and stripes, orange eyes, and antennae alternately striped in black and orange. The prothorax is blue-grey with yellow endings, and the abdomen is striped in yellow, black and blue. The wings are mostly reddish.

This aposematic coloring advertise the unpleasant smell, and presumably taste, of the body of this grasshopper [1].

The elegant grasshopper, Zonocerus elegans, occurs in large numbers in Kilosa district, in Tanzania, during the dry season June to January and attacks a wide range of wild and crop plants [2].

Calliptamus italicus is a species of “short horned” grasshopper native to Europe and Asia. They reach a length of up to 40 mm. They display a wide variation in size and coloration. This polyphagous species can feed on various wild plants, such as crops, especially legumes.
Photograph: Kulac                                                                        via: Wikipedia

Calliptamus italicus is a species of “short horned” grasshopper native to Europe and Asia. They reach a length of up to 40 mm. They display a wide variation in size and coloration. This polyphagous species can feed on various wild plants, such as crops, especially legumes.

Photograph: Kulac                                                                        via: Wikipedia