astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Genus: Macroxiphus
Macroxiphus is a genus of unusual katydids (Tettigoniidae) that are distributed throughout South East Asia and Micronesia. Members of Macroxiphus are unique in that their larvae are exceptional ant mimics, and use their mimicry to trick potential predators into thinking they are harmful ants. Macroxiphus spp. will lose this disguise as they move on into adulthood.
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Orthoptera-Ensifera-Tettigoniidea-Tettigonioidea-Tettigoniidae-Macroxiphus
Image: Muhammad Mahdi Karim

astronomy-to-zoology:

Genus: Macroxiphus

Macroxiphus is a genus of unusual katydids (Tettigoniidae) that are distributed throughout South East Asia and Micronesia. Members of Macroxiphus are unique in that their larvae are exceptional ant mimics, and use their mimicry to trick potential predators into thinking they are harmful ants. Macroxiphus spp. will lose this disguise as they move on into adulthood.

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Orthoptera-Ensifera-Tettigoniidea-Tettigonioidea-Tettigoniidae-Macroxiphus

Image: Muhammad Mahdi Karim

libutron
libutron:

Elegant Grasshopper - Zonocerus elegans | ©LAMPSHELL   (Timbavati Nature Reserve, South Africa)
This striking colored African grasshopper, Zonocerus elegans (Orthoptera - Pyrgomorphidae), reaches up to 50 mm in length, and may or may not have fully developed wings. The head is black with yellow spots and stripes, orange eyes, and antennae alternately striped in black and orange. The prothorax is blue-grey with yellow endings, and the abdomen is striped in yellow, black and blue. The wings are mostly reddish.
This aposematic coloring advertise the unpleasant smell, and presumably taste, of the body of this grasshopper [1].
The elegant grasshopper, Zonocerus elegans, occurs in large numbers in Kilosa district, in Tanzania, during the dry season June to January and attacks a wide range of wild and crop plants [2].

libutron:

Elegant Grasshopper - Zonocerus elegans | ©LAMPSHELL   (Timbavati Nature Reserve, South Africa)

This striking colored African grasshopper, Zonocerus elegans (Orthoptera - Pyrgomorphidae), reaches up to 50 mm in length, and may or may not have fully developed wings. The head is black with yellow spots and stripes, orange eyes, and antennae alternately striped in black and orange. The prothorax is blue-grey with yellow endings, and the abdomen is striped in yellow, black and blue. The wings are mostly reddish.

This aposematic coloring advertise the unpleasant smell, and presumably taste, of the body of this grasshopper [1].

The elegant grasshopper, Zonocerus elegans, occurs in large numbers in Kilosa district, in Tanzania, during the dry season June to January and attacks a wide range of wild and crop plants [2].

Calliptamus italicus is a species of “short horned” grasshopper native to Europe and Asia. They reach a length of up to 40 mm. They display a wide variation in size and coloration. This polyphagous species can feed on various wild plants, such as crops, especially legumes.
Photograph: Kulac                                                                        via: Wikipedia

Calliptamus italicus is a species of “short horned” grasshopper native to Europe and Asia. They reach a length of up to 40 mm. They display a wide variation in size and coloration. This polyphagous species can feed on various wild plants, such as crops, especially legumes.

Photograph: Kulac                                                                        via: Wikipedia

The desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria)

… is a species of locust (swarming grasshopper species). Plagues of desert locusts have threatened agricultural production in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia for centuries. The livelihood of at least one-tenth of the world’s human population can be affected by this voracious insect. The desert locust is potentially the most dangerous of the locust pests because of the ability of swarms to fly rapidly across great distances. It has two to five generations per year.

The last major desert locust upsurge in 2004–05 caused significant crop losses in West Africa and had a negative impact on food security in the region. While the desert locust alone is not responsible for famines, it can be an important contributing factor.

The desert locust lives a solitary life until it rains. Rain causes vegetation growth and allows the female to lay eggs in the sandy soil. The new vegetation provides food for the newly hatched locusts and provides them with shelter as they develop into winged adults…

(read more: Wikipedia)

photos by Christiaan Kooyman and Compton Tucker, NASA