Keepers at Paignton Zoo have stepped in to hand-raise a Pygmy Slow Loris baby that was neglected by its mother.

Dedicated keepers at Paignton Zoo in England are caring for a rare baby that weighed little more than a CD at birth.

The Pygmy Slow Loris – which weighed just 22 grams when it was born - was one of twins born to a first-time mother. One twin did not survive, and keepers stepped in to save the other when its mother abandoned it.

For the first night Head Mammal Keeper Craig Gilchrist slept in an office at the zoo, feeding the tiny youngster every couple of hours. It was given a milk replacer using a 1 milliliter syringe and a small rubber teat…

Read more: Zooborns

Good News:  Endangered Panda Lemur Makes a Comeback
by Jeremy Hance
One of the world’s biggest populations of greater bamboo lemurs (Prolemur simus)—sometimes known as the panda lemur—has doubled in just three years, giving conservationists new hope that the species can be kept from extinction. 
With the recent arrival of twenty babies, a community conservation project run by the Aspinall Foundation has boosted the local population to over 100 individuals in Andriantantely, one of Madagascar’s only surviving lowland rainforests. Greater bamboo lemurs are currently categorized as Critically Endangered, though they were once believed extinct until hidden populations were uncovered in the 1980s…
(read more: MongaBay)
photo: Hery Randriahaingo

Good News:  Endangered Panda Lemur Makes a Comeback

by Jeremy Hance

One of the world’s biggest populations of greater bamboo lemurs (Prolemur simus)—sometimes known as the panda lemur—has doubled in just three years, giving conservationists new hope that the species can be kept from extinction.

With the recent arrival of twenty babies, a community conservation project run by the Aspinall Foundation has boosted the local population to over 100 individuals in Andriantantely, one of Madagascar’s only surviving lowland rainforests. Greater bamboo lemurs are currently categorized as Critically Endangered, though they were once believed extinct until hidden populations were uncovered in the 1980s…

(read more: MongaBay)

photo: Hery Randriahaingo

Project NOAH Spotting of the Day:  
Spectral Tarsier (Tarsier tarsier)
Small nocturnal primate, endemic to Sulawesi, Indonesia. they have enormous eyes, each eyeball is approximately 16 mm in diameter and is as large as its entire brain.
Tarsiers are one of the main attractions at Tangkoko Batuangus National Park (the other being the black crested macaque). My guide and I went out late afternoon to look for them. He knew a few trees to check, as they live inside tree holes during the day. We found them in the first tree we checked. Three of them living in the tree. At one point all three of them were sitting on the tree, scanning their surroundings, waiting for night to fall. As soon as it got dark, just after 6pm, they left the tree with lightning speed and we soon lost sight of them.
Text/Photo: Dan Doucette
(via: Project NOAH)

Project NOAH Spotting of the Day: 

Spectral Tarsier (Tarsier tarsier)

Small nocturnal primate, endemic to Sulawesi, Indonesia. they have enormous eyes, each eyeball is approximately 16 mm in diameter and is as large as its entire brain.

Tarsiers are one of the main attractions at Tangkoko Batuangus National Park (the other being the black crested macaque). My guide and I went out late afternoon to look for them. He knew a few trees to check, as they live inside tree holes during the day. We found them in the first tree we checked. Three of them living in the tree. At one point all three of them were sitting on the tree, scanning their surroundings, waiting for night to fall. As soon as it got dark, just after 6pm, they left the tree with lightning speed and we soon lost sight of them.

Text/Photo: Dan Doucette

(via: Project NOAH)

A Glimpse of Liberia’s Secret Biodiversity

by FFI staff

A decade after the country emerged from conflict, Fauna & Flora International’s Josh Kempinski shares a glimpse into some of Liberia’s incredible and yet unseen biodiversity, from pygmy hippos to chimpanzees.

Liberia is a country famous for all the wrong reasons.

Decades back, it was only really known for tyre and rubber company Firestone’s enormous and controversial rubber plantation, at a time when Liberia was often referred to as the ‘Firestone Republic’.

But then things got worse – a lot worse. Two devastating civil wars gave the world Charles Taylor and nightmarish tales of cannibalism, child soldiers and the infamous blood diamonds; and these dominated Liberia’s new image.

What is less well known is that the wars were not only funded by diamonds, but mostly by timber – ‘blood timber’. Liberia is, by far, the most densely forested country in West Africa…

(read more: Fauna and Flora International)

photos: White-necked Rockfowl, Chimpanzees, and Zebra Duiker

The unusually large eyes and ears of Demidoff’s Dwarf Galago, Galagoides demidoff, are essential adaptations to its nocturnal lifestyle. Hunting during the night, it uses its acute senses to follow inconspicuous prey through the dense foliage of its rainforest habitat in equatorial Africa. Small insects, such as beetles and moths, form the bulk of its diet, but it will also forage for fruits and gums.  More about this species: Encyclopedia of LifeImage by Natalie Weber via iNaturalist.org 

The unusually large eyes and ears of Demidoff’s Dwarf Galago, Galagoides demidoff, are essential adaptations to its nocturnal lifestyle. Hunting during the night, it uses its acute senses to follow inconspicuous prey through the dense foliage of its rainforest habitat in equatorial Africa. Small insects, such as beetles and moths, form the bulk of its diet, but it will also forage for fruits and gums.

More about this species: Encyclopedia of Life

Image by Natalie Weber via iNaturalist.org 

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Lion-tailed macaque..!! | ©Sachin Shidlingannavar
Lion-tailed macaques, Macaca silenus (Primates - Cercopithecidae) are found only in India, in the Western Ghats mountains.
They are classified as a Endangered species on the IUCN Red List and are also included in Appendix I of CITES.
According to the last evaluation made by the IUCN Red List (ver. 3.1) the total wild population of Macaca silenus is estimated to be less than 4,000 individuals, made up of 47 isolated subpopulations in seven different locations. The macaque in the photo is from a self-sustainable single population of 32 groups of lion-tailed macaques in Sirsi-Honnavara, India.

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Lion-tailed macaque..!! | ©Sachin Shidlingannavar

Lion-tailed macaques, Macaca silenus (Primates - Cercopithecidae) are found only in India, in the Western Ghats mountains.

They are classified as a Endangered species on the IUCN Red List and are also included in Appendix I of CITES.

According to the last evaluation made by the IUCN Red List (ver. 3.1) the total wild population of Macaca silenus is estimated to be less than 4,000 individuals, made up of 47 isolated subpopulations in seven different locations. The macaque in the photo is from a self-sustainable single population of 32 groups of lion-tailed macaques in Sirsi-Honnavara, India.

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Greater bamboo lemur | ©Manuela Kulpa
The greater bamboo lemur (Prolemur simus) is the largest bamboo lemur, but it has the smallest population size of any other lemur species in Madagascar.
Their habitat is threatened by slash-and-burn agriculture, illegal logging, and the extensive cutting down of bamboo. In some areas greater bamboo lemurs are being hunted with slingshots and snares. The IUCN lists this species as Critically Endangered

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Greater bamboo lemur | ©Manuela Kulpa

The greater bamboo lemur (Prolemur simus) is the largest bamboo lemur, but it has the smallest population size of any other lemur species in Madagascar.

Their habitat is threatened by slash-and-burn agriculture, illegal logging, and the extensive cutting down of bamboo. In some areas greater bamboo lemurs are being hunted with slingshots and snares. The IUCN lists this species as Critically Endangered

The Zanzibar red colobus (Procolobus kirkii) is a species of red colobus monkey endemic to Unguja, the main island of the Zanzibar Archipelago, in Tanzania. Brought to attention of Western science by Sir John Kirk, this colobus was first described by John Edward Gray in 1868. It is now considered an endangered species, and extensive conservation efforts have been undertaken since the mid-1990s.
Photograph: juvenile pictured, byHasin Shakur                                         via: WIkipedia

The Zanzibar red colobus (Procolobus kirkii) is a species of red colobus monkey endemic to Unguja, the main island of the Zanzibar Archipelago, in Tanzania. Brought to attention of Western science by Sir John Kirk, this colobus was first described by John Edward Gray in 1868. It is now considered an endangered species, and extensive conservation efforts have been undertaken since the mid-1990s.

Photograph: juvenile pictured, byHasin Shakur                                         via: WIkipedia

Fruit-loving lemurs score higher on spatial memory tests Food-finding tests in five lemur species show that fruit-eaters may have better spatial memory than lemurs with a more varied diet.
Food-finding tests in five lemur species show that fruit-eaters may have better spatial memory than lemurs with a more varied diet.The results support the idea that relying on foods that are seasonally available and far-flung gives a competitive edge to individuals with certain cognitive abilities—such as remembering where the goodies are.
In a study appearing in the journal Animal Cognition, researchers Alexandra Rosati at Yale University and Kerri Rodriguez and Brian Hare of Duke compared spatial memory skills across five species of lemurs living in captivity at the Duke Lemur Center—fruit-eating red-ruffed and black-and-white ruffed lemurs, leaf-eating Coquerel’s sifakas, and ring-tailed and mongoose lemurs that eat a mix of fruit, leaves, seeds, flowers, nectar and insects…
(read more: PhysOrg)

Fruit-loving lemurs score higher on spatial memory tests

Food-finding tests in five lemur species show that fruit-eaters may have better spatial memory than lemurs with a more varied diet.

Food-finding tests in five lemur species show that fruit-eaters may have better spatial memory than lemurs with a more varied diet.The results support the idea that relying on foods that are seasonally available and far-flung gives a competitive edge to individuals with certain cognitive abilities—such as remembering where the goodies are.

In a study appearing in the journal Animal Cognition, researchers Alexandra Rosati at Yale University and Kerri Rodriguez and Brian Hare of Duke compared skills across five species of living in captivity at the Duke Lemur Center—fruit-eating red-ruffed and black-and-white ruffed lemurs, leaf-eating Coquerel’s sifakas, and ring-tailed and mongoose lemurs that eat a mix of fruit, leaves, seeds, flowers, nectar and insects…

(read more: PhysOrg)

Archaeoindris fontoynontii is an extinct, giant lemur and the largest primate known to have evolved on Madagascar, comparable in size to a male gorilla. It belonged to a family of extinct lemurs known as “sloth lemurs" (Palaeopropithecidae). The most likely lived between 8000 and 350 BCE…
(read more: Wikipedia)
illustration by Smokeybjb | Wikimedia

Archaeoindris fontoynontii is an extinct, giant lemur and the largest primate known to have evolved on Madagascar, comparable in size to a male gorilla. It belonged to a family of extinct lemurs known as “sloth lemurs" (Palaeopropithecidae). The most likely lived between 8000 and 350 BCE…

(read more: Wikipedia)

illustration by Smokeybjb | Wikimedia

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Leontopithecus chrysomelas (in tree) | ©Hans Hillewaert
The Golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas), also known as the Golden-headed tamarin, is a lion tamarin endemic to Brazil. It is found only in the lowland and premontane tropical forest fragments in the state of Bahia, and therefore is considered to be an endangered species.
Mammalia - Primates - Callitrichidae - Leontopithecus - L. chrysomelas

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Leontopithecus chrysomelas (in tree) | ©Hans Hillewaert

The Golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas), also known as the Golden-headed tamarin, is a lion tamarin endemic to Brazil. It is found only in the lowland and premontane tropical forest fragments in the state of Bahia, and therefore is considered to be an endangered species.

Mammalia - Primates - Callitrichidae - LeontopithecusL. chrysomelas

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Macaco-da-noite (Aotus nigriceps) - Peru | ©Cláudio Dias Timm
The Black-headed night monkeys, Aotus nigriceps, are small primates approximately the same size as a small squirrel. They are native to neotropical South America (Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia and Peru).
Animalia - Chordata - Mammalia - Primates - Aotidae - Aotus - A. nigriceps
More information.

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Macaco-da-noite (Aotus nigriceps) - Peru | ©Cláudio Dias Timm

The Black-headed night monkeys, Aotus nigriceps, are small primates approximately the same size as a small squirrel. They are native to neotropical South America (Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia and Peru).

Animalia - Chordata - Mammalia - Primates - Aotidae - Aotus - A. nigriceps

More information.

Video: Female Monkeys Throw Stones To Attract Males
People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones. But the tactic works for female capuchin monkeys who want a male’s attention.
by Douglas Main
To signal their readiness to mate and get males’ attention, some female capuchin monkeys in a Brazilian forest reserve have taken to throwing stones at the objects of their desire. It’s the first time this type of behavior has been witnessed in the wild. To make a scientifically dubious cross-species reference, perhaps they have simply run out of other courtship ideas, like human men honking horns in this Seinfeld bit (at 1:45). More typically, females signal their readiness to mate by pulling pouting faces, whining loudly or touching males and running away. But some female bearded capuchin monkeys in Serra da Capivara National Park have taken this more assertive approach. As the BBC reports…
(read more and watch video: Popular Science)
image: Tiago Falótico and Eduardo B. Ottoni / PLOS ONE

Video: Female Monkeys Throw Stones To Attract Males

People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones. But the tactic works for female capuchin monkeys who want a male’s attention.

by Douglas Main

To signal their readiness to mate and get males’ attention, some female capuchin monkeys in a Brazilian forest reserve have taken to throwing stones at the objects of their desire. It’s the first time this type of behavior has been witnessed in the wild. To make a scientifically dubious cross-species reference, perhaps they have simply run out of other courtship ideas, like human men honking horns in this Seinfeld bit (at 1:45). More typically, females signal their readiness to mate by pulling pouting faces, whining loudly or touching males and running away. But some female bearded capuchin monkeys in Serra da Capivara National Park have taken this more assertive approach. As the BBC reports

(read more and watch video: Popular Science)

image: Tiago Falótico and Eduardo B. Ottoni / PLOS ONE

Giant Apes May Have Been Brought Down By Fruit
by Colin Barras
It was fruit killed the beast. Gigantopithecus, the largest known ape, may have been wiped out by a diet of fruit containing little nourishment.
Nearly 80 years ago, Dutch anthropologist Gustav Heinrich Ralph von Koenigswald discovered a giant human-like tooth in a drug store in Hong Kong, and named the animal it came from Gigantopithecus.
Since then, thousands more large teeth – and three jawbones – have come to light in southern Asia. They show that Gigantopithecus stood up to 3 metres tall, making it the largest known ape, and was probably related to orang-utans. But why it went extinct remains unclear.
Now Yingqi Zhang of the Chinese Academy of Sciences’s Key Laboratory of Evolutionary Systematics of Vertebrates in Beijing has analysed 17 newly discovered Gigantopithecus teeth. At less than 400,000 years old, they are among the youngest remains of the ape ever found, meaning they belonged to some of the last of the giant apes to walk the Earth…
(read more: New Scientist)
image: Natural History Museum - London

Giant Apes May Have Been Brought Down By Fruit

by Colin Barras

It was fruit killed the beast. Gigantopithecus, the largest known ape, may have been wiped out by a diet of fruit containing little nourishment.

Nearly 80 years ago, Dutch anthropologist Gustav Heinrich Ralph von Koenigswald discovered a giant human-like tooth in a drug store in Hong Kong, and named the animal it came from Gigantopithecus.

Since then, thousands more large teeth – and three jawbones – have come to light in southern Asia. They show that Gigantopithecus stood up to 3 metres tall, making it the largest known ape, and was probably related to orang-utans. But why it went extinct remains unclear.

Now Yingqi Zhang of the Chinese Academy of Sciences’s Key Laboratory of Evolutionary Systematics of Vertebrates in Beijing has analysed 17 newly discovered Gigantopithecus teeth. At less than 400,000 years old, they are among the youngest remains of the ape ever found, meaning they belonged to some of the last of the giant apes to walk the Earth…

(read more: New Scientist)

image: Natural History Museum - London