Common Scaly-footed Lizard (Pygopus lepidopus)
The Common Scaly-foot is a widespread species of legless lizard in the Pygopodidae family. It is endemic to Australia. Up to 80 cm in length with a noticeable “keel” or ridge on the top of the lizard. Variable in colours and pattern. Prominent limb flaps may be seen on close inspection, hence the name “scaly foot”.
Mostly active at dusk or dawn (crepuscular), though can be nocturnal after high daytime temperatures. Lives in long grasses, heaths and woodlands. Most often seen on warm mornings, foraging for food. When threatened, the Scalyfoot flashes its thick fleshy tongue, in an apparent mimicry of snakes. Usually two eggs laid per clutch…
(read more: Wikipedia)      
(photo: by Eyeweed, taken at Dudley, NSW, Australia)

Common Scaly-footed Lizard (Pygopus lepidopus)

The Common Scaly-foot is a widespread species of legless lizard in the Pygopodidae family. It is endemic to Australia. Up to 80 cm in length with a noticeable “keel” or ridge on the top of the lizard. Variable in colours and pattern. Prominent limb flaps may be seen on close inspection, hence the name “scaly foot”.

Mostly active at dusk or dawn (crepuscular), though can be nocturnal after high daytime temperatures. Lives in long grasses, heaths and woodlands. Most often seen on warm mornings, foraging for food. When threatened, the Scalyfoot flashes its thick fleshy tongue, in an apparent mimicry of snakes. Usually two eggs laid per clutch…

(read more: Wikipedia)      

(photo: by Eyeweed, taken at Dudley, NSW, Australia)

Flap-footed Lizards (family Pygopodidae)

… a family of squamates that have reduced or absent limbs and are related to the geckos. There are at least 35 sp. They have unusually long, slender, bodies, giving them a strong resemblance to snakes. Like both snakes and most geckos, they have no eyelids, but unlike snakes, they have external ear-holes and flat, non-forked tongues. Native to Australia and New Guinea.
Pygopods have no fore-limbs at all, but they do possess vestigial hind limbs in the form of small, flattened, flaps. These may have some role in courtship and defensive behaviour, and may even aid in locomotion through vegetation. Some species are insectivorous burrowing animals, but others are adapted to moving through dense spinifex or other vegetation. Like the Geckos, Pygopods lay two eggs in each clutch and nest communally. Some nests have been found to have as many as 30 eggs. Also like the geckos, Pygopods have the ability to vocalise - emitting a high pitched squeak. Snakes are incapable of vocalising.
(text via: Wikipedia)

(photo: Burton’s legless lizard, Lialis burtonis, by Smacdonald)

Flap-footed Lizards (family Pygopodidae)

… a family of squamates that have reduced or absent limbs and are related to the geckos. There are at least 35 sp. They have unusually long, slender, bodies, giving them a strong resemblance to snakes. Like both snakes and most geckos, they have no eyelids, but unlike snakes, they have external ear-holes and flat, non-forked tongues. Native to Australia and New Guinea.

Pygopods have no fore-limbs at all, but they do possess vestigial hind limbs in the form of small, flattened, flaps. These may have some role in courtship and defensive behaviour, and may even aid in locomotion through vegetation. Some species are insectivorous burrowing animals, but others are adapted to moving through dense spinifex or other vegetation. Like the Geckos, Pygopods lay two eggs in each clutch and nest communally. Some nests have been found to have as many as 30 eggs. Also like the geckos, Pygopods have the ability to vocalise - emitting a high pitched squeak. Snakes are incapable of vocalising.

(text via: Wikipedia)

(photo: Burton’s legless lizard, Lialis burtonis, by Smacdonald)