libutron
libutron:

Crested Eagle - Morphnus guianensis 
With large size and slender form, the Crested Eagle, Morphnus guianensis (Accipitridae), is a South and Central American raptor that lives primarily in tropical and subtropical forest. 
These eagles reach up to 84 cm in length and wingspan up to 176 cm. The underparts are variable, there are dark morph and pale morphs.   
Crested Eagles take medium-sized birds, mammals such as monkeys and opossums, reptiles, and frogs. They still-hunt from a perch, and may forage by flying slowly above the canopy. 
This species is regarded as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List. 
Other common names are Guianan Crested Eagle, Águila Crestada, Águila Monera, Arpía Menor.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Thierry Montford | Locality: French Guiana (2009)

libutron:

Crested Eagle - Morphnus guianensis 

With large size and slender form, the Crested Eagle, Morphnus guianensis (Accipitridae), is a South and Central American raptor that lives primarily in tropical and subtropical forest. 

These eagles reach up to 84 cm in length and wingspan up to 176 cm. The underparts are variable, there are dark morph and pale morphs.   

Crested Eagles take medium-sized birds, mammals such as monkeys and opossums, reptiles, and frogs. They still-hunt from a perch, and may forage by flying slowly above the canopy. 

This species is regarded as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List. 

Other common names are Guianan Crested Eagle, Águila Crestada, Águila Monera, Arpía Menor.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Thierry Montford | Locality: French Guiana (2009)

astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

Chimango Caracara (Milvago chimango)

…a species of Caracara (Polyborinae) which occurs in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay. Chimango caracaras typically inhabit subtropical and tropical dry shrubland, temperate grassland, Patagonian steppe, and heavily degraded former forests. Like other caracaras Milvago chimango is omnivorous and will feed on reptiles, amphibians, other small animals and carrion. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Falconiformes-Falconidae-Polyborinae-Milvago-M. chimango

Images: E. Schreurs and Cláudio Dias Timm

ABC Bird of the Week:  Snail Kite
The Snail Kite has one of the most specialized tools among raptors: a long, deeply curved beak designed to pull snails—the birds’ main food—out of their shells. This specialized diet restricts the Snail Kite to wetlands, so if that habitat is destroyed, the bird declines.
When hunting, Snail Kites fly low over marshlands, plunging down to snatch snails from just under the water or from vegetation. They then return to a favorite perch to feed. Although common in Latin America, the species is a federal and state endangered species in the United States.
Snail Kites are gregarious and may congregate in flocks at roost sites (as this recording from Brazil demonstrates) or while foraging for food. The birds also nest in colonies in low trees and bushes, usually over water. This species is markedly dimorphic: males are a dark blue-gray with striking red legs and females are streaked brown and white, with a white eyebrow line…
(read more: American Bird Conservancy)
 photograph by R.J. Wiley

ABC Bird of the Week:  Snail Kite

The Snail Kite has one of the most specialized tools among raptors: a long, deeply curved beak designed to pull snails—the birds’ main food—out of their shells. This specialized diet restricts the Snail Kite to wetlands, so if that habitat is destroyed, the bird declines.

When hunting, Snail Kites fly low over marshlands, plunging down to snatch snails from just under the water or from vegetation. They then return to a favorite perch to feed. Although common in Latin America, the species is a federal and state endangered species in the United States.

Snail Kites are gregarious and may congregate in flocks at roost sites (as this recording from Brazil demonstrates) or while foraging for food. The birds also nest in colonies in low trees and bushes, usually over water. This species is markedly dimorphic: males are a dark blue-gray with striking red legs and females are streaked brown and white, with a white eyebrow line…

(read more: American Bird Conservancy)

 photograph by R.J. Wiley

Peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus)
… are the fastest members of the animal kingdom. When preying on other birds, peregrines can dive through the air at speeds of over 200 mph! Usually, the impact from the dive (or stoop) will kill or stun the prey, and then the peregrine will retrieve the prey in mid-air. This fearless species also happens to be one of the most common and widespread birds of prey in the world. 
(via: Grand Teton National Park - WY, USA)

Peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus)

… are the fastest members of the animal kingdom. When preying on other birds, peregrines can dive through the air at speeds of over 200 mph! Usually, the impact from the dive (or stoop) will kill or stun the prey, and then the peregrine will retrieve the prey in mid-air. This fearless species also happens to be one of the most common and widespread birds of prey in the world.

(via: Grand Teton National Park - WY, USA)

Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge - TX

Scientists for The Peregrine Fund have located a natural nest in use by a pair of Aplomado Falcons (Falco femoralis) at the refuge, in a yucca. These birds have primarily been using the artificial nest boxes provided for them which have a cover to prevent predation by great horned owls. So far all looks good with these nestlings. This species was once extirpated from much of their range in the SW United States, but is once again doing well because of conservation efforts.

photo credit: Larry Ditto (x)