astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

Pygmy Falcon (Polihierax semitorquatus)

Also known as the African Pygmy Falcon, P. semitorquatus is a small species of falcon, that occurs in eastern and southern Africa. The population in eastern Africa (P. s. castanotus) occurs from Sudan to Somalia south to Uganda and Tanzania. The population in southern Africa (P. s. semitorquatus) occurs from Angola to South Africa.

True to its common name P. semitorquatus is very small at only 19-20 cm long, making it the smallest raptor in Africa. Pygmy falcons typically inhabit dry bush habitats and will feed on insects, small mammals, birds, and reptiles. Pygmy falcons will usually in the nests of weavers, and even though they feed on bird will rarely go after their weaver neighbors.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Falconiformes-Falconidae-Polihierax-P. semitorquatus

Images: Steve Garvie and Bob

Have you seen? We have bald eagle babies!

Our National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) in partnership with the Outdoor Channel provides a Live Eagle Cam to stream the activities of an eagle nest located 110 feet up, in a tree on the NCTC grounds. The nest has been active since 2006, fledging several juvenile bald eagles. The eagles return to the nest for the winter season around mid-January, with eggs being laid in early February that hatched this year in late March.

Follow updates here and the live feed: http://www.fws.gov/nctc/cam and on Twitter at ‪#‎LiveEagleCam‬

Another great live eagle cam from the Pennsylvania Game Commission (http://www.pgc.state.pa.us/) has also been capturing viewers’ attention shown recently on ABC News: http://abcn.ws/1hvPrxY

Photos: Two eaglets and mom. (USFWS)

(via: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

mypubliclands

mypubliclands:

Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area

Congress established the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area in 1993 to protect a unique environment that supports one of the world’s most dense concentrations of nesting birds of prey.  Falcons, eagles, hawks and owls are found here in unique profusion and variety.  It is part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands. The Omnibus Public Lands Management Act of 2009 officially added the name of conservationist Morley Nelson to the NCA, in honor of Nelson’s work on behalf of birds of prey and their habitats.

The BLM manages the area to preserve its remarkable wildlife habitat while providing for other compatible uses of the land, so that birds of prey flourish here as they have for thousands of years.

CLICK HERE to learn more about the area.

-Photos by Bob Wick, BLM

dendroica
dendroica:

This African Fish Eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer) swooped down, talons outstretched to calmly pluck the fish out of the water but the big fish had other ideas and tried to fight back. The battle was captured by keen photographer Chad Wright during a trip this year to Mabalingwe Nature Reserve in Limpopo Province, South Africa.
Picture: CHAD WRIGHT / CATERS NEWS
(via Pictures of the day: 5 March 2014 - Telegraph)

dendroica:

This African Fish Eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer) swooped down, talons outstretched to calmly pluck the fish out of the water but the big fish had other ideas and tried to fight back. The battle was captured by keen photographer Chad Wright during a trip this year to Mabalingwe Nature Reserve in Limpopo Province, South Africa.

Picture: CHAD WRIGHT / CATERS NEWS

(via Pictures of the day: 5 March 2014 - Telegraph)

dendroica
theraptorcage:

Collared Forest-Falcon (Micrastur semitorquatus), Brazil
The Collared Forest-Falcon is one of those birds of prey that you rarely see. Their songs echoes through the forest morning, but you rarely get to see this large falcon at all, as they remain inside the forest. They are extremelly fierce and effective predators specialized in large birds. They may kill birds as large as guans and macaws!We saw and photographed this guy at the extension forest tour, right where hundreds of macaws nest and roost… I wonder why.
(photo/text: Octavio Campos Salles)

theraptorcage:

Collared Forest-Falcon (Micrastur semitorquatus), Brazil

The Collared Forest-Falcon is one of those birds of prey that you rarely see. Their songs echoes through the forest morning, but you rarely get to see this large falcon at all, as they remain inside the forest. They are extremelly fierce and effective predators specialized in large birds. They may kill birds as large as guans and macaws!

We saw and photographed this guy at the extension forest tour, right where hundreds of macaws nest and roost… I wonder why.

(photo/text: Octavio Campos Salles)

Nature’s Olympians:  Peregrine Falcons

by Tom, USFWS intern

Still going strong, the falcon takes a respectable finish. A classic redemption narrative, the peregrine falcon’s recovery is known by most. Research by Rachel Carson led to the restriction of DDT, which was thinning the shells of falcon eggs by reducing the amount of calcium. After remarkably successful recovery efforts worldwide, the falcon was removed from the endangered species list in 1999.

Now a symbol of our nation’s recovering threatened and endangered species, the peregrine falcon is one of nature’s swiftest and most beautiful birds of prey.

And, check out this awesome falcon cam atop the tallest university library in the world and my home during finals weeks, W.E.B. DuBois.

(via: USFWS - NE)

Groups Oppose First-ever Plan to Allow Killing of Eagles at Wind Facility
Mega Wind Facility in Wyoming Projected to Kill about 55 Golden Eagles Annually
ABC media release
Two leading conservation groups, American Bird Conservancy (ABC) and Biodiversity Conservation Alliance (BCA), have voiced opposition to a federal plan that would allow a proposed mega wind facility in Wyoming to kill from 46 to 64 Golden Eagles annually.
The two groups have submitted a 15-page letter in response to a request from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) for comment on the eagle-killing proposal, called an “eagle take permit.” The proposed wind project is Power Company of Wyoming LLC’s Chokecherry and Sierra Madre Wind Energy Project (CCSMP) that may include up to 1,000 large wind turbines and would be located south of Sinclair and Rawlins in Carbon County, Wyo. The project received initial federal approval on October 9, 2012…
(read more: American Bird Conservancy)

Groups Oppose First-ever Plan to Allow Killing of Eagles at Wind Facility

Mega Wind Facility in Wyoming Projected to Kill about 55 Golden Eagles Annually

ABC media release

Two leading conservation groups, American Bird Conservancy (ABC) and Biodiversity Conservation Alliance (BCA), have voiced opposition to a federal plan that would allow a proposed mega wind facility in Wyoming to kill from 46 to 64 Golden Eagles annually.

The two groups have submitted a 15-page letter in response to a request from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) for comment on the eagle-killing proposal, called an “eagle take permit.” The proposed wind project is Power Company of Wyoming LLC’s Chokecherry and Sierra Madre Wind Energy Project (CCSMP) that may include up to 1,000 large wind turbines and would be located south of Sinclair and Rawlins in Carbon County, Wyo. The project received initial federal approval on October 9, 2012…

(read more: American Bird Conservancy)

metazoa-etcetera

metazoa-etcetera:

Help Chintimini Wildlife Center Repair its Flight Cages.

A recent major winter storm in the Willamette Valley of Oregon had dire consequences for the Chintimini Wildlife Center.  The storm dropped over a foot of snow on our wildlife rehabilitation flight cages. Two of these essential cages collapsed under the weight of the snow. One is (was) 30 feet long, the other 60 feet. These cages are invaluable to our rehabilitation efforts, and absolutely have to be replaced if we are going to be able to continue our work.

Last year was a record setting year with 1,311 animals admitted (3/4 of them birds), and we expect this year to be even busier, so we need to get these cages replaced or repaired by spring at the latest. We are reaching out to the community to ask for contributions to a fund to help us get these structures back in working order so that we can continue to provide care for Oregon’s injured and orphaned wildlife. 

If you can’t donate (and even if you can), signal boosts are greatly appreciated!

To learn more about Chintimini Wildlife Center, visit them on the web! http://www.chintiminiwildlife.org/