palaeopedia
palaeopedia:

The chinese beautiful feather, Sinocalliopteryx (2007)
Phylum : ChordataClass : ReptiliaOrder : SaurischiaSuborder : TheropodaFamily : CompsognathidaeGenus : SinocalliopteryxSpecies : S. gigas
Early Cretaceous (124,6 Ma)
2,4 m long and 20 kg (size)
Yixian formation, China (map)
As an example of how big Sinocalliopteryx was, compared to other dino-birds of the early Cretaceous period, a fossilized specimen has been found with the remains of a raptor in its gut—proving that some feathered dinosaurs hunted and ate other feathered dinosaurs. While 7 feet long and 75 pounds may not sound very impressive, in terms of later dinosaurs, these measurements were apparently enough to put Sinocalliopteryx near the top of the Eurasian food chain. (The closest competitor of this dinosaur appears to have been another large dino-bird, Huaxiagnathus.)
Not only was Sinocalliopteryx big, but it sported big feathers, too. The remains of this theropod bear the imprints of tufts as long as four inches, as well as shorter feathers around its feet. And a new study shows that Sinocalliopteryx put its size to good use: an individual has been identified harboring the remains of no less than three fossilized specimens of Confuciusornis, a much smaller dino-bird that may actually have been capable of powered flight.

palaeopedia:

The chinese beautiful feather, Sinocalliopteryx (2007)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Reptilia
Order : Saurischia
Suborder : Theropoda
Family : Compsognathidae
Genus : Sinocalliopteryx
Species : S. gigas

  • Early Cretaceous (124,6 Ma)
  • 2,4 m long and 20 kg (size)
  • Yixian formation, China (map)

As an example of how big Sinocalliopteryx was, compared to other dino-birds of the early Cretaceous period, a fossilized specimen has been found with the remains of a raptor in its gut—proving that some feathered dinosaurs hunted and ate other feathered dinosaurs. While 7 feet long and 75 pounds may not sound very impressive, in terms of later dinosaurs, these measurements were apparently enough to put Sinocalliopteryx near the top of the Eurasian food chain. (The closest competitor of this dinosaur appears to have been another large dino-bird, Huaxiagnathus.)

Not only was Sinocalliopteryx big, but it sported big feathers, too. The remains of this theropod bear the imprints of tufts as long as four inches, as well as shorter feathers around its feet. And a new study shows that Sinocalliopteryx put its size to good use: an individual has been identified harboring the remains of no less than three fossilized specimens of Confuciusornis, a much smaller dino-bird that may actually have been capable of powered flight.

whomping
libutron:

Carter’s Semaphore Gecko - Pristurus carteri
This is a Carter’s Semaphore Gecko male, Pristurus carteri (Gekkonidae), a species endemic to the southern Arabian Peninsula (Oman, Yemen and United Arab Emirates).
In the day these geckos behave more like agamids than geckos, they raise their body as far as possible off the hot desert surface by climbing onto rocks and standing upright.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Drew Gardner | Locality: Oman (2007)

libutron:

Carter’s Semaphore Gecko - Pristurus carteri

This is a Carter’s Semaphore Gecko male, Pristurus carteri (Gekkonidae), a species endemic to the southern Arabian Peninsula (Oman, Yemen and United Arab Emirates).

In the day these geckos behave more like agamids than geckos, they raise their body as far as possible off the hot desert surface by climbing onto rocks and standing upright.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Drew Gardner | Locality: Oman (2007)

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Painted Terrapin
The beautiful and critically endangered Painted Terrapin (Batagur borneonesis) is found in several countries in South East Asia where it inhabits large river systems, estuaries and mangrove forests. 
This species is sexually dimorphic, meaning there are obvious differences between the males and females. The most notable difference is their color. During the breeding season the male’s head changes from a greyish color with orange on the top to bright white with a black-edged red patch on top! 
Females, with their plain brown coloration, may be seen nesting on the same ocean beaches used by marine turtles and both hatchlings and adults can tolerate pure saltwater for short periods of time! T
Photo credit: Andrew Brinker
(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Painted Terrapin

The beautiful and critically endangered Painted Terrapin (Batagur borneonesis) is found in several countries in South East Asia where it inhabits large river systems, estuaries and mangrove forests.

This species is sexually dimorphic, meaning there are obvious differences between the males and females. The most notable difference is their color. During the breeding season the male’s head changes from a greyish color with orange on the top to bright white with a black-edged red patch on top!

Females, with their plain brown coloration, may be seen nesting on the same ocean beaches used by marine turtles and both hatchlings and adults can tolerate pure saltwater for short periods of time! T

Photo credit: Andrew Brinker

(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

libutron
libutron:

Carolina Diamondback Terrapin - Malaclemys terrapin centrata
An attractive adult male of the Carolina Diamondback Terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin centrata (Testudines - Emydidae), a subspecies found from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to northern Florida, in the United States.
Reference: [1] 
Photo credit: ©Kevin Stohlgren | Locality: Glynn Co., Georgia, US (2013)

libutron:

Carolina Diamondback Terrapin - Malaclemys terrapin centrata

An attractive adult male of the Carolina Diamondback Terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin centrata (Testudines - Emydidae), a subspecies found from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to northern Florida, in the United States.

Reference: [1

Photo credit: ©Kevin Stohlgren | Locality: Glynn Co., Georgia, US (2013)

libutron
libutron:

Tropical Flat Snake - Siphlophis compressus
This neotropical snake with the body beautifully colored in burgundy red is commonly named Tropical Flat Snake and Red-eyed Treesnake, and its scientific name is Siphlophis compressus (Colubridae). 
It is a rarely observed species from lower Central America and South America that remains poorly known and is presumably endangered in several regions.
Reference: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©cowyeow | Locality: Peruvian Amazon, Mariscal Ramón Castilla, Loreto, Peru (2005)

libutron:

Tropical Flat Snake - Siphlophis compressus

This neotropical snake with the body beautifully colored in burgundy red is commonly named Tropical Flat Snake and Red-eyed Treesnake, and its scientific name is Siphlophis compressus (Colubridae).

It is a rarely observed species from lower Central America and South America that remains poorly known and is presumably endangered in several regions.

Reference: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©cowyeow | Locality: Peruvian Amazon, Mariscal Ramón Castilla, Loreto, Peru (2005)

palaeopedia
palaeopedia:

The wounding tooth, Troödon (1856)
Phylum : ChordataClass : ReptiliaOrder : SaurischiaSuborder : TheropodaFamily : TroodontidaeGenus : TroödonSpecies : T. formosus, T. inequalis, T. asiamericanus?
Late Cretaceous (75 - 65 Ma)
2,4 m long and 50 kg (size)
Judith river formation, USA (map)
One of the last theropods to evolve and prosper before the K/T Extinction 65 million years ago, Troodon was unusually brainy by dinosaur standards: paleontologists think it may even have been as smart as small, primitive mammals like opossums (that may not sound like much of a compliment, but you have to remember that most dinosaurs of the Mesozoic Era, especially the plant-eaters, were about as bright as tree stumps). Troodon doubtless owed its advanced brain to its equally advanced predatory arsenal, which included a fast, bipedal gait, stereo vision, and probably a sharp sense of smell.
A relatively slender theropod closely related to the small, feathered dino-birds of the late Cretaceous period (most notably Saurornithoides), the human-sized Troodon lacked the brawn to match its brain—which may explain why it occasionally resorted to feeding on the eggs of other dinosaurs. As to its own reproductive habits, there’s voluminous evidence that Troodon cared for its own hatchlings after birth, a behavior shared by a few known species of hadrosaurs, or duck-billed dinosaurs (the most prominent examples being Maiasaura and Hypacrosaurus).
Troodon has been the subject of an amusing bit of speculation by paleontologist Dale Russell, who wondered if this dinosaur might have evolved advanced intelligence if it had managed to survive the K/T Extinction. Russell even created a model of an eerily human-looking “reptoid” derived from the Troodon lineage—sort of a snapshot of what Troodon might have evolved into if it had managed to live to the present day.
(More about Troödon)

palaeopedia:

The wounding tooth, Troödon (1856)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Reptilia
Order : Saurischia
Suborder : Theropoda
Family : Troodontidae
Genus : Troödon
Species : T. formosus, T. inequalis, T. asiamericanus?

  • Late Cretaceous (75 - 65 Ma)
  • 2,4 m long and 50 kg (size)
  • Judith river formation, USA (map)

One of the last theropods to evolve and prosper before the K/T Extinction 65 million years ago, Troodon was unusually brainy by dinosaur standards: paleontologists think it may even have been as smart as small, primitive mammals like opossums (that may not sound like much of a compliment, but you have to remember that most dinosaurs of the Mesozoic Era, especially the plant-eaters, were about as bright as tree stumps). Troodon doubtless owed its advanced brain to its equally advanced predatory arsenal, which included a fast, bipedal gait, stereo vision, and probably a sharp sense of smell.

A relatively slender theropod closely related to the small, feathered dino-birds of the late Cretaceous period (most notably Saurornithoides), the human-sized Troodon lacked the brawn to match its brain—which may explain why it occasionally resorted to feeding on the eggs of other dinosaurs. As to its own reproductive habits, there’s voluminous evidence that Troodon cared for its own hatchlings after birth, a behavior shared by a few known species of hadrosaurs, or duck-billed dinosaurs (the most prominent examples being Maiasaura and Hypacrosaurus).

Troodon has been the subject of an amusing bit of speculation by paleontologist Dale Russell, who wondered if this dinosaur might have evolved advanced intelligence if it had managed to survive the K/T Extinction. Russell even created a model of an eerily human-looking “reptoid” derived from the Troodon lineage—sort of a snapshot of what Troodon might have evolved into if it had managed to live to the present day.

(More about Troödon)

What an amazing find! 
A female Sundarbans River Terrapin (Batagur baska) was discovered in a family pond in Bangladesh. The turtle had been kept as a pet for 16 years. After much discussion, the turtle’s owner agreed to sell the critically endangered turtle to the team’s breeding colony, adding a seventh female and diversifying the genetic base! In this touching photo, the previous owner says good-bye to her beloved pet.
You can read more about this exceptional story here:
Turtle Survival Alliance

What an amazing find!

A female Sundarbans River Terrapin (Batagur baska) was discovered in a family pond in Bangladesh. The turtle had been kept as a pet for 16 years. After much discussion, the turtle’s owner agreed to sell the critically endangered turtle to the team’s breeding colony, adding a seventh female and diversifying the genetic base! In this touching photo, the previous owner says good-bye to her beloved pet.

You can read more about this exceptional story here:

Turtle Survival Alliance