libutron
libutron:

Brown House Snake 
Boaedon capensis (Colubridae), better known as Cape House Snake, is a non-venomous species endemic to Southern Africa, inhabiting a wide range of habitats. 
This species varies greatly in appearance and size throughout it’s range, and there are also several morphs in the pet trade. They are sexually dimorphic, males attain an overall length of around 60 cm and females as large as 120 cm.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Tyrone Ping  | Locality: Vaalwater, Limpopo, South Africa

libutron:

Brown House Snake 

Boaedon capensis (Colubridae), better known as Cape House Snake, is a non-venomous species endemic to Southern Africa, inhabiting a wide range of habitats.

This species varies greatly in appearance and size throughout it’s range, and there are also several morphs in the pet trade. They are sexually dimorphic, males attain an overall length of around 60 cm and females as large as 120 cm.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Tyrone Ping  | Locality: Vaalwater, Limpopo, South Africa

prehistoric-birds
elijahshandseight:

Conchoraptor gracilis .
Among the theropods that I draw less frequently, Oviraptorids (and Oviraptorosauria in general) are among the most fascinating coelurosaurs. What amazes me is how much they resemble today’s parrots, especially at the level of the skull. An affinity that seemed even more pronounced when I decided to use the reconstruction by Jaime A. Headden of the oviraptorine Conchoraptor and give it a complete plumage: the resemblance to a lorikeet or a cockatiel is impressive. Because there aren’t any kind of developed cephalic crest, the animal in question seems more than anything else a real parrot  also taking into account the dutiful anatomical precautions.
The main difference between this picture and Headden's diagrams lies mainly in the positioning of the nostrils. As shown in the study by Lautenschlager et al. the greater extension of the beak of a large part of the rostrum, especially in the area of the premaxilla, involves a repositioning of some structures, like the nostrils, and a radical change in appearance. In this Conchoraptor such ’ innovation ’ is not so obvious, but in the future I will show you that the research in question involves evident iconographic changes on a large scale.
Like for Teratophoneus and Lythronax, because patience is the key to everything, this reconstruction will be undergoing gradual changes. First of all the plumage: even if I’m ‘able’ to paint scaly or bare skin in a more or less ‘passable’ way, with a thick layer of fur and/or feathers I still can not get the desired results. Fortunately, there are lots and lots of textbooks and online tutorials (I’ve already found some very good ones), and there’s nothing to do except making more and more exercise and practice.
Also, for the first time in my life, the scanning seems to have even improved the original design. I still can not believe it. It will be the usual fluke.
A Conch Plunderer, 2014.
Coloured with Tria Markers and pencils. Acrylics were used for some light effetcs.
Paper size: A4. Made on Letraset’s Bleedproof Marker Pad.
Loosely based on: brown lory and kea.
References: Jaime A. Headden & “Lautenschlager S, Witmer LM, Altangerel P, Rayfield EJ (2013) Edentulism, beaks and biomechanical innovations in the evolution of theropod dinosaurs. PNAS: 1310711110v1-201310711.”
Links: http://ktboundary-smnt2000.blogspot.it/2014/03/a-conch-plunderer.html, http://smnt2000.deviantart.com/art/A-Conch-Plunderer-442066832

elijahshandseight:

Conchoraptor gracilis .

Among the theropods that I draw less frequently, Oviraptorids (and Oviraptorosauria in general) are among the most fascinating coelurosaurs. What amazes me is how much they resemble today’s parrots, especially at the level of the skull. An affinity that seemed even more pronounced when I decided to use the reconstruction by Jaime A. Headden of the oviraptorine Conchoraptor and give it a complete plumage: the resemblance to a lorikeet or a cockatiel is impressive. Because there aren’t any kind of developed cephalic crest, the animal in question seems more than anything else a real parrot  also taking into account the dutiful anatomical precautions.

The main difference between this picture and Headden's diagrams lies mainly in the positioning of the nostrils. As shown in the study by Lautenschlager et al. the greater extension of the beak of a large part of the rostrum, especially in the area of the premaxilla, involves a repositioning of some structures, like the nostrils, and a radical change in appearance. In this Conchoraptor such ’ innovation ’ is not so obvious, but in the future I will show you that the research in question involves evident iconographic changes on a large scale.

Like for Teratophoneus and Lythronax, because patience is the key to everything, this reconstruction will be undergoing gradual changes. First of all the plumage: even if I’m ‘able’ to paint scaly or bare skin in a more or less ‘passable’ way, with a thick layer of fur and/or feathers I still can not get the desired results. Fortunately, there are lots and lots of textbooks and online tutorials (I’ve already found some very good ones), and there’s nothing to do except making more and more exercise and practice.

Also, for the first time in my life, the scanning seems to have even improved the original design. I still can not believe it. It will be the usual fluke.

A Conch Plunderer, 2014.

Coloured with Tria Markers and pencils. Acrylics were used for some light effetcs.

Paper size: A4. Made on Letraset’s Bleedproof Marker Pad.

Loosely based on: brown lory and kea.

References: Jaime A. Headden & “Lautenschlager S, Witmer LM, Altangerel P, Rayfield EJ (2013) Edentulism, beaks and biomechanical innovations in the evolution of theropod dinosaurs. PNAS: 1310711110v1-201310711.”

Links: http://ktboundary-smnt2000.blogspot.it/2014/03/a-conch-plunderer.htmlhttp://smnt2000.deviantart.com/art/A-Conch-Plunderer-442066832

libutron
libutron:

Children’s python - Antaresia childreni
Native to Australia, the Children’s python, Antaresia childreni (Pythonidae) is one of the smallest pythons. It reaches about 3 feet (91 cm). Pattern may fade considerably as the snake grows and some individuals may have no pattern as adults.
The genus name, Antaresia, comes from the star Antares in the tail of the constellation Scorpius. While the species name, childreni, is after John George Children (an English naturalist responsible for the zoological collection at the British Museum in the first half of the 19th century), not because they make good children’s pets.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Guillaume Roch Puig | Locality: unknown (2014)

libutron:

Children’s python - Antaresia childreni

Native to Australia, the Children’s python, Antaresia childreni (Pythonidae) is one of the smallest pythons. It reaches about 3 feet (91 cm). Pattern may fade considerably as the snake grows and some individuals may have no pattern as adults.

The genus name, Antaresia, comes from the star Antares in the tail of the constellation Scorpius. While the species name, childreni, is after John George Children (an English naturalist responsible for the zoological collection at the British Museum in the first half of the 19th century), not because they make good children’s pets.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Guillaume Roch Puig | Locality: unknown (2014)

grimchild

grimchild:

image

Scorpion Tailed Gecko

This small lizard is a native of Oman. When threatened they curl their tales up to mimic a scorpion.

image

Scorpion Tailed Spider

Speaking of scorpion tails… This group of spiders have long tails that also mimic the threat display of a scorpion. Though unlike their…

reptilefacts
libutron:

Blind Ground Snake  (Velvety Swamp Snake)
This non-venomous snake, Liophis typhlus typhlus (Colubridae), has a bright green color throughout the body, and a green-brownish unclear vertebral line.
It is a South American species occurring in Colombia, Venezuela, Guyana, Surinam, French Guiana, Brazil, Peru, Ecuador, Paraguay, Bolivia and possibly in Argentina.
References: [1]
Photo credit: ©cowyeow | Locality: Peruvian Amazon

libutron:

Blind Ground Snake  (Velvety Swamp Snake)

This non-venomous snake, Liophis typhlus typhlus (Colubridae), has a bright green color throughout the body, and a green-brownish unclear vertebral line.

It is a South American species occurring in Colombia, Venezuela, Guyana, Surinam, French Guiana, Brazil, Peru, Ecuador, Paraguay, Bolivia and possibly in Argentina.

References: [1]

Photo credit: ©cowyeow | Locality: Peruvian Amazon

Unexpected Reptilian Survivor of Dinosaurs’ Destruction

by Stephen Luntz

The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs may not have been quite as global as previously thought, judging by some discoveries from Argentina.

New Zealand is host to two reptile species that have long been thought to be the only members of the Rhynchocephalia to survive the mass extinction 66 million years ago. Now, however, it has been discovered that at least one other member of this order made it through the apocalypse to last at least another 23 million years.

The Mesozoic era is called the age of reptiles, not just for the dinosaurs that dominate our imagination, but for all the other reptilian species that flourished at the time. Among these were the Rynchocephalia, which looked like lizards and occupied many of the same ecological niches the Squamata hold today.

However, the same post-asteroid conditions that did in the dinosaurs were bad for other reptiles, and it was thought that only the tuatara made it through to represent the Rynchocephalia. Now a 43 million year old fossil dubbed Kawasphenodon peligrenis has been found in Patagonia…

(read more: I Fucking Love Science)

images: knutschie and Apesteguia S, Gomez RO, Rougier

Baby Sea Turtles Found to Make Noise to Coordinate Hatching

by Brianna Elliott

If you’ve ever witnessed a sea turtle nest hatch, you’ve probably noticed that it seems like these reptiles emerge from their nests in silence. Scientists have long assumed that too, but a new study adds to a growing body of literature that finds that baby sea turtles can in fact make noise—and this communication is key to a successful hatching  process.

In a recent study published in Chelonian Conservation and Biology, researchers examined leatherback sea turtle nests, and found that the hatchlings and embryos made multiple noises and sounds—indicating they’re communicating with each other in the days before they hatch. The scientists recorded more than 300 different sounds, and classified them into four unique sound types: chirps, grunts, and two “complex hybrid tones,” according to the Smithsonian…

(read more: The Beacon - Oceana.org)

photos by Oceana - Tim Calver

alphynix
alphynix:

Marine Reptile Month #20 — Trinacromerum
Late Cretaceous period (~100-89 mya)
With short necks and elongated heads, the polycotylid plesiosaurs look very similar to the pliosaurs — but they were actually members of the mostly long-necked plesiosauroids instead.
Trinacromerum’s streamlined shape and long flippers would have allowed it to swim at high speeds. At around 3m in length (9ft 10in), its life appearance had been likened to a giant “four-flippered penguin”.
Color palette used: “Blood Orange”

alphynix:

Marine Reptile Month #20 — Trinacromerum

Late Cretaceous period (~100-89 mya)

With short necks and elongated heads, the polycotylid plesiosaurs look very similar to the pliosaurs — but they were actually members of the mostly long-necked plesiosauroids instead.

Trinacromerum’s streamlined shape and long flippers would have allowed it to swim at high speeds. At around 3m in length (9ft 10in), its life appearance had been likened to a giant “four-flippered penguin”.

Color palette used: “Blood Orange

libutron
libutron:

Dwarf Caiman - Paleosuchus palpebrosus
Also named Cuvier’s Smooth-fronted Caiman, Paleosuchus palpebrosus (Crocodylia - Alligatoridae) is a small, South American caiman, found near rivers and inundated savanna areas. This species is the smallest of the family. Males grow to about 1.3-1.5 meters, while the females grow to 1.2 meters. 
Paleosuchus palpebrosus is a social species with diverse and interesting behaviors. Like most crocodilians, they can convey social messages through sounds, postures, movements, smells, and touch. Although most crocodilians are somewhat social, P. palpebrosus are typically found alone or in pairs. 
Systematic studies of adults indicate that there are dominance hierarchies within groups. The most hostile and aggressive individuals appear to be the most dominant. These individuals control access to mates, nest sites, food, and living space. Dominance is asserted and maintained by social signals and displays.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Thierry Montford | Locality: French Guiana (2008)

libutron:

Dwarf Caiman - Paleosuchus palpebrosus

Also named Cuvier’s Smooth-fronted Caiman, Paleosuchus palpebrosus (Crocodylia - Alligatoridae) is a small, South American caiman, found near rivers and inundated savanna areas. This species is the smallest of the family. Males grow to about 1.3-1.5 meters, while the females grow to 1.2 meters. 

Paleosuchus palpebrosus is a social species with diverse and interesting behaviors. Like most crocodilians, they can convey social messages through sounds, postures, movements, smells, and touch. Although most crocodilians are somewhat social, P. palpebrosus are typically found alone or in pairs. 

Systematic studies of adults indicate that there are dominance hierarchies within groups. The most hostile and aggressive individuals appear to be the most dominant. These individuals control access to mates, nest sites, food, and living space. Dominance is asserted and maintained by social signals and displays.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Thierry Montford | Locality: French Guiana (2008)

libutron
libutron:

Northern Banded Coffee Snake - Ninia pavimentata
It is a small colubrid snake of the species Ninia pavimentata (Colubridae), native to the highlands of central Guatemala, and Honduras.
Adults of this non-venomous snake grow up to 0.28 m in length.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Josiah Townsend | Locality: La Liberación, 1030 m, Reserva de Vida Silvestre Texiguat, Honduras (2010)

libutron:

Northern Banded Coffee Snake - Ninia pavimentata

It is a small colubrid snake of the species Ninia pavimentata (Colubridae), native to the highlands of central Guatemala, and Honduras.

Adults of this non-venomous snake grow up to 0.28 m in length.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Josiah Townsend | Locality: La Liberación, 1030 m, Reserva de Vida Silvestre Texiguat, Honduras (2010)