njwight
njwight:

I am posting this photo of a 4 month old white rhino in South Africa, who I call Little Shrek, as a tribute to the 4 rhinos massacred in Kenya this week. It is deeply, deeply upsetting to hear about these killings, the worst rhino poaching episode in 25 years. I fear we will lose these incredible creatures. They just cannot reproduce at the rate of human greed.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/11/four-rhinos-killed-kenya_n_5577942.html?&ncid=tweetlnkushpmg00000067

Cdghddbjtdvjfxjhdfff!!! Rhino kitten!!!

njwight:

I am posting this photo of a 4 month old white rhino in South Africa, who I call Little Shrek, as a tribute to the 4 rhinos massacred in Kenya this week. It is deeply, deeply upsetting to hear about these killings, the worst rhino poaching episode in 25 years. I fear we will lose these incredible creatures. They just cannot reproduce at the rate of human greed.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/11/four-rhinos-killed-kenya_n_5577942.html?&ncid=tweetlnkushpmg00000067

Cdghddbjtdvjfxjhdfff!!! Rhino kitten!!!

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Yesterday (5/20/14), the Service adopted as a final rule an interim rule to list the southern white rhino — the last remaining unprotected species of rhinoceros — as threatened due to similarity of appearance under the Endangered Species Act. This closes a loophole that has been exploited by unscrupulous poachers and traffickers seeking to cash in on global demand for rhino horn. This action substantially facilitates law enforcement actions to protect and conserve all rhino species! 
  Learn more about this announcement at the USFWS Endangered Species page and http://1.usa.gov/1lD3aBB. Photo: Southern white rhinos (Karl Stromayer/USFWS)
Yesterday (5/20/14), the Service adopted as a final rule an interim rule to list the southern white rhino — the last remaining unprotected species of rhinoceros — as threatened due to similarity of appearance under the Endangered Species Act. This closes a loophole that has been exploited by unscrupulous poachers and traffickers seeking to cash in on global demand for rhino horn. This action substantially facilitates law enforcement actions to protect and conserve all rhino species!


Learn more about this announcement at the USFWS Endangered Species page and http://1.usa.gov/1lD3aBB.

Photo: Southern white rhinos (Karl Stromayer/USFWS)

palaeopedia
palaeopedia:

The Hyrax tooth, Hyracodon (1856)
Phylum : ChordataClass : MammaliaOrder : PerissodactylaFamily : HyracodontidaeSubfamily : HyracodontinaeGenus : HyracodonSpecies : H. browni, H. leidyanus, H. medius, H. nebraskensis, H. petersoni
Middle Eocene/late Oligocene (32 - 26 Ma)
1,5 m long and 200 kg
North America
It was a lightly built, pony-like mammal of about 1.5 m long. Hyracodon’s skull was large in comparison to the rest of the body. Hyracodon’s dentition resembled that of later rhinoceroses, but it was a much smaller animal and differed very little in appearance from the primitive horses of which it was a contemporary (32-26 million years ago). It had a short, broad snout and its long, slender limbs had three digits.
Like the primitive horses, hyracodonts inhabited open forests and wooded steppes and turned from browsing foliage to grazing grass. They died out without leaving any descendants and they mark the end of the phylogenetic branch of hornless, running rhinoceroses.
This small, fast-running creature was a close relative of the largest land mammal that ever lived, the 8 m long Paraceratherium.

palaeopedia:

The Hyrax tooth, Hyracodon (1856)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Mammalia
Order : Perissodactyla
Family : Hyracodontidae
Subfamily : Hyracodontinae
Genus : Hyracodon
Species : H. browni, H. leidyanus, H. medius, H. nebraskensis, H. petersoni

  • Middle Eocene/late Oligocene (32 - 26 Ma)
  • 1,5 m long and 200 kg
  • North America

It was a lightly built, pony-like mammal of about 1.5 m long. Hyracodon’s skull was large in comparison to the rest of the body. Hyracodon’s dentition resembled that of later rhinoceroses, but it was a much smaller animal and differed very little in appearance from the primitive horses of which it was a contemporary (32-26 million years ago). It had a short, broad snout and its long, slender limbs had three digits.

Like the primitive horses, hyracodonts inhabited open forests and wooded steppes and turned from browsing foliage to grazing grass. They died out without leaving any descendants and they mark the end of the phylogenetic branch of hornless, running rhinoceroses.

This small, fast-running creature was a close relative of the largest land mammal that ever lived, the 8 m long Paraceratherium.

njwight
njwight:

Please Shout for Little Shrek
The DEA in South Africa has released rhino poaching statistics for 2013.  There has been a staggering increase in slaughtered animals over 2012 and the number of arrests has declined. Incomprehensible. I am thinking of Little Shrek right now and whether he will get to grow old. Makes me nuts…
Stats here: http://www.stoprhinopoaching.com/statistics.aspx
njwight:

Here is the handsome youngster, just over four weeks old. Shrek the rhino. Show him your love!

njwight:

Please Shout for Little Shrek

The DEA in South Africa has released rhino poaching statistics for 2013.  There has been a staggering increase in slaughtered animals over 2012 and the number of arrests has declined. Incomprehensible. I am thinking of Little Shrek right now and whether he will get to grow old. Makes me nuts…

Stats here: http://www.stoprhinopoaching.com/statistics.aspx

njwight:

Here is the handsome youngster, just over four weeks old. Shrek the rhino. Show him your love!

Protection for White Rhinos
Our friends at USFWS Endangered Species have taken immediate action to protect the southern white rhino under the Endangered Species Act in response to the poaching crisis decimating rhino populations worldwide. By extending this protection to the white rhino – the last remaining unprotected rhinoceros species – they are closing a loophole that has been exploited by poachers and traffickers looking to cash in on the global demand for rhino horn. 
Learn more: http://1.usa.gov/18MMYIEPhoto: USFWS/M.Gadd
(via: USFWS_International Affairs)

Protection for White Rhinos

Our friends at USFWS Endangered Species have taken immediate action to protect the southern white rhino under the Endangered Species Act in response to the poaching crisis decimating rhino populations worldwide. By extending this protection to the white rhino – the last remaining unprotected rhinoceros species – they are closing a loophole that has been exploited by poachers and traffickers looking to cash in on the global demand for rhino horn.

Learn more: http://1.usa.gov/18MMYIE

Photo: USFWS/M.Gadd

(via: USFWS_International Affairs)

DOLLAR VALUE OF HUNTED AFRICAN ANIMALS

by Jennifer Viegas

Nearly any animal can be legally killed in many parts of Africa, so long as the hunter pays the right amount of money. For rare and endangered species, the cost can escalate to thousands of U.S. dollars, suggests documentation issued by the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Management in Zimbabwe.

“National parks are obviously trying to make money,” Johnny Rodrigues, Chairman for Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force, told Discovery News. “The hunters have to pay the parks if they want to shoot the animals.”

It can be a Catch-22, since the parks often struggle to pay their staff, which include those who work to care for and protect the animals. Permitting a hunter to shoot a black rhino yields a quick $120,000. The high price tag may serve as a deterrent, but it also reflects how much poachers can earn without even benefiting the parks…

(read more: Discovery News)

photos by Patrick Giraud (t) and Vassil (b) via Wikipedia

Ground Zero for Endangered species:

New program to Assist Animals on the Brink Across SE Asia

by Lacey Avery

Organizations within the international conservation community are joining forces to minimize impending extinctions in Southeast Asia, where habitat loss, trade and hunting have contributed to a dramatic decline in wildlife. The coalition is aptly named ASAP, or the Asian Species Action Partnership.

“ASAP began as a response to alarming results revealed in a 2008 comprehensive assessment for the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species,” Rachel Roberts, International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Species Survival Commission (IUCN SSC) network coordination officer, told mongabay.com.

The assessment revealed a heavy concentration of threatened mammals in Southeast Asia with similar trends observed for other animals. In response, interested conservation organizations came together in a joint call for action…

(read more: Monga Bay)

images: M - Tamaraw, by Gregg Yan; M - Orangutan, by Eleifert | Wikipedia; B - Sumatran Rhino, by Jeremy Hance

Shomili, a four-month old greater one-horned rhinoceros, or Indian Rhino, runs behind her mother Sundari at San Diego Zoo Safari Park. Shomili, or “Mili” as zookeepers call her, was released into the park’s Asian Savanna habitat to join the rest of the zoo’s herd on April 23, 2013. Mili is the 65th greater one-horned rhino born at the zoo, which is working to conserve this endangered species. Only about 3,400 of these rhinos survive in the wild.
credit: Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Safari Park
(via: Live Science)

Shomili, a four-month old greater one-horned rhinoceros, or Indian Rhino, runs behind her mother Sundari at San Diego Zoo Safari Park. Shomili, or “Mili” as zookeepers call her, was released into the park’s Asian Savanna habitat to join the rest of the zoo’s herd on April 23, 2013. Mili is the 65th greater one-horned rhino born at the zoo, which is working to conserve this endangered species. Only about 3,400 of these rhinos survive in the wild.

credit: Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Safari Park

(via: Live Science)

Rhino populations in Sumatra, Borneo should be combined to save Sumatran rhino from extinction

by MongaBay staff

A new study argues for treating endangered Sumatran populations in Borneo and Sumatra as “a single conservation unit”, lending academic support to a controversial proposal to move wild rhinos from Malaysia to Indonesia.

The paper, authored by an international team of rhino experts and published in the journal Oryx, says that genetic differences between the island populations are minimal. Given the dire straights of the species — the wild population is estimated at less than 100 individuals — the researchers argue that ensuring the Sumatran rhino’s survival takes precedence over preserving what little genetic diversity remains between populations…

(read more: MongaBay)

Malaysia May Lend Rhinos to Indonesia to Save Species From Extinction
by Monga Bay staff
Conservationists and officials meeting last month at a rhino crisis summit in Singapore agreed to a radical plan to loan Sumatran rhinos between nations if it means saving the critically endangered species from extinction.  The proposal, which could still be thwarted by red tape and political opposition, could lead Malaysia to send some of its Sumatran rhinos to semi-captive breeding facilities in Indonesia.  “I will bring to my government for approval whatever I and other Sumatran rhino experts feel are the best recommendations for specific actions. If that involves a recommendation to loan rhinos between nations, so be it. This is our very last chance to save the species, and we must get it right this time,” said Laurentius Ambu, Sabah Wildlife Department, in a statement issued after the conclusion of the conference. “While doing that, we are at the same time maximising our efforts via parallel initiatives by collaborating with overseas reproductive experts on different options available to us since time is not with us.”…
(read more: MongaBay)                        
(photo: Land Empowerment Animals People (LEAP)/BORA)

Malaysia May Lend Rhinos to Indonesia to Save Species From Extinction

by Monga Bay staff

Conservationists and officials meeting last month at a rhino crisis summit in Singapore agreed to a radical plan to loan Sumatran rhinos between nations if it means saving the critically endangered species from extinction.

The proposal, which could still be thwarted by red tape and political opposition, could lead Malaysia to send some of its Sumatran rhinos to semi-captive breeding facilities in Indonesia.

“I will bring to my government for approval whatever I and other Sumatran rhino experts feel are the best recommendations for specific actions. If that involves a recommendation to loan rhinos between nations, so be it. This is our very last chance to save the species, and we must get it right this time,” said Laurentius Ambu, Sabah Wildlife Department, in a statement issued after the conclusion of the conference. “While doing that, we are at the same time maximising our efforts via parallel initiatives by collaborating with overseas reproductive experts on different options available to us since time is not with us.”…

(read more: MongaBay)                        

(photo: Land Empowerment Animals People (LEAP)/BORA)

To stop poaching, wildlife managers are taking desperate measures… poison.

So far this year, more than 200 rhinos have been killed by poachers in South Africa alone, according to the Guardian, and conservationists fear that number will climb to about 1,000 before the end of this year.

And it isn’t the rhinos themselves that are valuable — it’s their horns, Inquisitr.com reports. Though the horns are made of keratin (the same substance found in fingernails), they’re valued by some Asian cultures as an aphrodisiac and as medicine…