The Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus) 
… is the largest living species of fish, with individuals reaching lengths of 41 feet (12.5 m) or more. Though fearsome in size, Whale Sharks are gentle giants. They feed on plankton and small fish, and are generally quite tame and docile around divers. 
Unlike dolphins and whales, which give birth to a single large baby, Whale Sharks are ovoviviparous - they produce up to a few hundred eggs, which the mother incubates within her body. They are fertilized slowly using stored sperm, and babies are birthed with regularity rather than in one large event. When born, young Whale Sharks are dwarfed by their mother, measuring only 16 to 24 inches (40 to 60 cm) long. Individuals take a long time to reach sexual maturity, first starting to breed around 30 years old, but may live to ages of 70 or more years. 
They inhabit tropical and sub-tropical oceans worldwide; on North America’s coasts, they are primarily found off California in the Pacific, and sometimes as far north as New York in the Atlantic.
photo by Zac Wolf, borrowed from Wikimedia
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

The Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus)

… is the largest living species of fish, with individuals reaching lengths of 41 feet (12.5 m) or more. Though fearsome in size, Whale Sharks are gentle giants. They feed on plankton and small fish, and are generally quite tame and docile around divers.

Unlike dolphins and whales, which give birth to a single large baby, Whale Sharks are ovoviviparous - they produce up to a few hundred eggs, which the mother incubates within her body. They are fertilized slowly using stored sperm, and babies are birthed with regularity rather than in one large event. When born, young Whale Sharks are dwarfed by their mother, measuring only 16 to 24 inches (40 to 60 cm) long. Individuals take a long time to reach sexual maturity, first starting to breed around 30 years old, but may live to ages of 70 or more years.

They inhabit tropical and sub-tropical oceans worldwide; on North America’s coasts, they are primarily found off California in the Pacific, and sometimes as far north as New York in the Atlantic.

photo by Zac Wolf, borrowed from Wikimedia

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

Bizarre Blue Shark Nursery Found in the North Atlantic

Rather than emerging in protected coves, baby blue sharks spend their first years in a big patch of open ocean

by Rachel Nuwer

The scientists trapped 37 blue sharks ranging in age from young juveniles to adults and outfitted them with satellite transmitters. They released the sharks and then waited for the data to arrive. As months rolled into years, an interesting pattern emerged.
Within the first two years of life, the researchers report in the journal PLOS ONE, the sharks spent most of their time in a patch of the North Atlantic.
Most shark species establish nurseries in protected bays or other sheltering areas. The notion that blue sharks grow up completely out in the open suggests that protection from predators is not a motivating factor. But figuring out what advantages, if any, that particular spot provides will require further study…
images: Photos by Nuno Sa/Nature Picture Library/Corbis and Mark Conlin/NMFS, graphic from Vandeperre et al., PLOS ONE
lostbeasts

strangebiology:

Paleontologists found this sweet whorl of teeth called a Helicoprion, but really didn’t know how it might have been situated in a fish’s mouth. 

There were many theories postulated about how the teeth fit in the animal’s mouth (fourth image). When another specimen was found, it was determined that the owner of this strange jaw (not a shark, but a ratfish) had no upper teeth at all.

Ladies and gentlemen, the most metal fish.

(via Laelaps/National Geographic) Art by Ray Troll.

cool-critters

cool-critters:

Bowmouth guitarfish (Rhina ancylostoma)

The bowmouth guitarfish is a species of ray. This rare species occurs widely in the tropical coastal waters of the western Indo-Pacific.

This large species can reach a length of 2.7 m (8.9 ft). The jaws are heavily ridged with crushing teeth arranged in wave-like rows. Usually found near the sea floor, the bowmouth guitarfish prefers sandy or muddy areas near underwater structures.

It is a strong-swimming predator of bony fishes, crustaceans, and molluscs. This species gives live birth to litters of two to eleven pups, which are nourished during gestation by yolk. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has assessed the bowmouth guitarfish as Vulnerable because it is widely caught by artisanal and commercial fisheries for its valuable fins and meat.

The bowmouth guitarfish, often described as prehistoric in appearance, is considered by some scientists to be the ‘missing link’ between sharks and rays based on the ray-like placement of the mouth and gill openings, and disc shape of the front part of the body and the shark-like streamlined appearance of the rest of the body and the powerful tail.

photo credits:Brian Gratwicke, Jason Isley, planetearth, link

How Tiger Sharks Affect Shark Bay’s Eco-System

For the last two decades, Michael Heithaus has been studying how tiger sharks affect one particular ecosystem – Shark Bay, Australia, one of the world’s most pristine seagrass ecosystems. The Florida International University biologist explains how his team studies these top predators and their prey, and why tiger sharks are so important to the health of Shark Bay.

(via: National Science Foundation)

scientificillustration
alexa-rossi:

Helicoprion
I like prehistoric sharks a lot; they come in all kinds of weird shapes so you can re-imagine them as you like, practically. This one I like because the unusual whorl of teeth that even to this day hasn’t been properly placed within this shark’s anatomy.
This is my reconstruction of Helicoprion bessonovi.

alexa-rossi:

Helicoprion

I like prehistoric sharks a lot; they come in all kinds of weird shapes so you can re-imagine them as you like, practically. This one I like because the unusual whorl of teeth that even to this day hasn’t been properly placed within this shark’s anatomy.

This is my reconstruction of Helicoprion bessonovi.

The Cretaceous (Cenomanian) continental record of the Laje do Coringa flagstone (Alcântara Formation), Brazil, northeastern South America   [2014]
Highlights:
• A summary of the Cretaceous flora and fauna of Alcântara Formation, Brazil.
• Evidence of the existence of a trans-oceanic Gondwanan fauna until the Cenomanian.
• Forested areas surrounded by dry environment in Brazilian northeastern coast. 
Abstract:
The fossil taxa of the Cenomanian continental flora and fauna of São Luís Basin are observed primarily in the bone bed of the Laje do Coringa, Alcântara Formation. Many of the disarticulated fish and tetrapod skeletal and dental elements are remarkably similar to the chronocorrelate fauna of Northern Africa. In this study, we present a summary of the continental flora and fauna of the Laje do Coringa bone-bed.
The record emphasizes the existence of a trans-oceanic typical fauna, at least until the early Cenomanian, which may be interpreted as minor evolutionary changes after a major vicariant event or as a result of a land bridge across the equatorial Atlantic Ocean, thereby allowing interchanges between South America and Africa.
The paleoenvironmental conditions in the northern Maranhão State coast during that time were inferred as forested humid areas surrounded by an arid to semi-arid landscape.
The paper:
Manuel Alfredo Medeiros, Rafael Matos Lindoso, Ighor Dienes Mendes and Ismar de Souza Carvalho. 2014. Journal of South American Earth Sciences. 53, 50–58. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsames.2014.04.002
(via: NovaTaxa - Species new to Science)

The Cretaceous (Cenomanian) continental record of the Laje do Coringa flagstone (Alcântara Formation), Brazil, northeastern South America   [2014]

Highlights:

  • • A summary of the Cretaceous flora and fauna of Alcântara Formation, Brazil.
  • • Evidence of the existence of a trans-oceanic Gondwanan fauna until the Cenomanian.
  • • Forested areas surrounded by dry environment in Brazilian northeastern coast. 

Abstract:

The fossil taxa of the Cenomanian continental flora and fauna of São Luís Basin are observed primarily in the bone bed of the Laje do Coringa, Alcântara Formation. Many of the disarticulated fish and tetrapod skeletal and dental elements are remarkably similar to the chronocorrelate fauna of Northern Africa. In this study, we present a summary of the continental flora and fauna of the Laje do Coringa bone-bed.

The record emphasizes the existence of a trans-oceanic typical fauna, at least until the early Cenomanian, which may be interpreted as minor evolutionary changes after a major vicariant event or as a result of a land bridge across the equatorial Atlantic Ocean, thereby allowing interchanges between South America and Africa.

The paleoenvironmental conditions in the northern Maranhão State coast during that time were inferred as forested humid areas surrounded by an arid to semi-arid landscape.

The paper:

Manuel Alfredo Medeiros, Rafael Matos Lindoso, Ighor Dienes Mendes and Ismar de Souza Carvalho. 2014. Journal of South American Earth Sciences. 53, 50–58. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsames.2014.04.002

(via: NovaTaxa - Species new to Science)

Happy World Ocean Day!

Every June 8, the world takes a day to celebrate the ocean and its amazing creatures. We celebrate the ocean every day here at the Ocean Portal, but we hope that you take a moment to think about what you love the most about the sea.

Photos: From our ‘Portraits of Planet Ocean’ Flickr contest. Flickr users: Erwin Poliakoff (edpdiver), Bill Under (billunder), Susana Martins (susanamart), Russell Gilbert (RCG maru), and Bobby Pfeiffer (AdventureBobby).

(via: The Ocean Portal - Smithsonian)

Newly Found ‘Godzilla Shark’ Had Teeth Like Namesake
by Jennifer Viegas
A 300-million-year-old shark, dubbed “Godzilla shark,” has been found in the Monzano Mountains east of Albuquerque, New Mexico, paleontologist John-Paul-Hodnett informed Discovery News.
Hodnett is an independent researcher with institutional ties to Northern Arizona University and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. He serendipitously came across the tip of the shark’s nose, embedded in rock, while on a trip to the mountains. Its size, anatomy, age, and state of preservation make it a noteworthy discovery, in addition to the shark’s resemblance to the fictional Godzilla…
(read more: Discovery News)
illustration by Ray Troll

Newly Found ‘Godzilla Shark’ Had Teeth Like Namesake

by Jennifer Viegas

A 300-million-year-old shark, dubbed “Godzilla shark,” has been found in the Monzano Mountains east of Albuquerque, New Mexico, paleontologist John-Paul-Hodnett informed Discovery News.

Hodnett is an independent researcher with institutional ties to Northern Arizona University and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. He serendipitously came across the tip of the shark’s nose, embedded in rock, while on a trip to the mountains. Its size, anatomy, age, and state of preservation make it a noteworthy discovery, in addition to the shark’s resemblance to the fictional Godzilla…

(read more: Discovery News)

illustration by Ray Troll