The Diadem sifaka, Propithecus diadema, is an endangered lemur endemic to eastern Madagascar. The forest habitat of these rare primates is threatened by slash-and-burn agricultural practices and timber extraction. They are also hunted for food, even within protected areas. More about this species: http://eol.org/pages/326457/details Photo by C. Michael Hogan via iNaturalist.org
(via: Encyclopedia of Life)

The Diadem sifaka, Propithecus diadema, is an endangered lemur endemic to eastern Madagascar. The forest habitat of these rare primates is threatened by slash-and-burn agricultural practices and timber extraction. They are also hunted for food, even within protected areas.

More about this species: http://eol.org/pages/
326457/details

Photo by C. Michael Hogan via iNaturalist.org

(via: Encyclopedia of Life)

Silky Sifaka (Propithecus candidus)
image caption: Propithecus diadema, sericeus variety (A. Milne Edwards and A. Grandidier), discovered by Mr. Guinet around Sambava (NE coast of Madagascar)… The white spots which are marked on the muzzle vary in a number and size according to the individual.
from L’Histoire Physique, Naturelle et Politique de Madagascar, planche II, Vol. XX, 1892, by Alfred Grandidier

Silky Sifaka (Propithecus candidus)

image caption: Propithecus diadema, sericeus variety (A. Milne Edwards and A. Grandidier), discovered by Mr. Guinet around Sambava (NE coast of Madagascar)… The white spots which are marked on the muzzle vary in a number and size according to the individual.

from L’Histoire Physique, Naturelle et Politique de Madagascar, planche II, Vol. XX, 1892, by Alfred Grandidier

Cockerell’s Sifaka (Propithecus coquereli)
Photograph by Hermann Erber/Photo Library
Ninety percent of the plants and animals found on the island of Madagascar evolved there and nowhere else. All of the country’s 70-plus species of lemur—including this sifaka—are considered endangered. To help protect them and other unique species, the government has set aside more than nine million acres (3.7 million hectares) of land.
(via: National Geo)

Cockerell’s Sifaka (Propithecus coquereli)

Photograph by Hermann Erber/Photo Library

Ninety percent of the plants and animals found on the island of Madagascar evolved there and nowhere else. All of the country’s 70-plus species of lemur—including this sifaka—are considered endangered. To help protect them and other unique species, the government has set aside more than nine million acres (3.7 million hectares) of land.

(via: National Geo)

wildlifecollective

eximago: Sifakas

Propithecus is a genus of diurnal lemurs in the family Indriidae commonly known as sifakas (shi-fok), named for the sound of their calls. They’re herbivorous, eating leaves, flowers, and fruit. Sifakas are arboreal animals, hopping from tree to tree, and are remarkably agile and precise with their leaps. When they aren’t foraging, social groups of up to thirteen individuals sit together sun bathing and grooming one another with their specialized tooth-combs. These social groups are territorial and disputes often lead to the death of males and infanticide. Despite the aggression, they usually tolerate some territorial overlap, and don’t mind sharing territories with other lemur species.

All members of the genus are threatened with extinction.

Members of Propithecus: