astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Cymatium lotorium
…is a species of triton (Ranellidae) which is widely distributed throughout the Indo-Pacific oceans. Like other tritons Cymantium lotorium is a predator and will feed on echinoderms and other molluscs by gripping them with its muscular foot and using its radula to saw through their hard shells/skin. Once it has finished “drilling” it will inject a paralyzing saliva into the prey which subdues the prey allowing C. lotorium to feed at its leisure. 
Classification
Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-Caenogastropoda-Hypsogastropoda-Littorinimorpha-Tonnoidea-Ranellidae-Ranellinae-Cymatium-C. lotorium
Image: George Chernilvsky 

astronomy-to-zoology:

Cymatium lotorium

…is a species of triton (Ranellidae) which is widely distributed throughout the Indo-Pacific oceans. Like other tritons Cymantium lotorium is a predator and will feed on echinoderms and other molluscs by gripping them with its muscular foot and using its radula to saw through their hard shells/skin. Once it has finished “drilling” it will inject a paralyzing saliva into the prey which subdues the prey allowing C. lotorium to feed at its leisure. 

Classification

Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-Caenogastropoda-Hypsogastropoda-Littorinimorpha-Tonnoidea-Ranellidae-Ranellinae-Cymatium-C. lotorium

Image: George Chernilvsky 

paisleywitch-deactivated2014061

tervaneula:

MORE SNAILS WHEEEEE we took new photos of them today with Piippu

These are Achatina fulica f. white jade, they can be found from this post over here as well. They are already adults! <3<3<3 Miss Universum is 8.5 cm and Riviera 8 cm in shell length. We had a third one, who is seen in the post I linked, but he never really grew and died just recently. Rest in peace, sweet little Invisible Man. ♥

But these two, I really really REALLY love them ahhh they’ve already been showing each other their love darts, I can’t wait for them to lay eggs! Though… there’s always a possibility that neither of them is fertile, but I won’t give up hope! SNAIL BABBIES IHIHIIIIII

alphynix

for-science-sake:

The Butterfly Snail (Limacina helicina) is a species of predatory swimming marine snail. They are a keystone species within Arctic pelagic ecosystems and are currently under serious threat.

They are being impacted by Ocean Acidification, due to pollution the ocean waters are becoming too acidic for survival. The corrosive waters off the West Coast of the U.S are dissolving the shells of these unique creatures and inevitably killing them. The decline of these will have major flow on effects to major marine ecosystems.

libutron
libutron:

Otway Black Snail | ©Ken J. Beath 
The Otway Black Snail, Victaphanta compacta (Rhytididae), is a carnivorous land snail, only found in wet forests and cool temperate rainforests in the Otway Ranges, Victoria, Australia. 

The body of the snail is grey-blue to black; the shell is spherical with four whorls and varies from a glossy dark brown to black with tinges of yellow-brown on the inner whorl. The shell has a maximum diameter of 28mm and is positioned towards the tail of the body. The shell is thin, light weight and moderately flexible and comprised mostly of conchin [1]. 
Victaphanta compacta is regarded as Endangered species os the IUCN Red List [2].

libutron:

Otway Black Snail | ©Ken J. Beath 

The Otway Black Snail, Victaphanta compacta (Rhytididae), is a carnivorous land snail, only found in wet forests and cool temperate rainforests in the Otway Ranges, Victoria, Australia. 

The body of the snail is grey-blue to black; the shell is spherical with four whorls and varies from a glossy dark brown to black with tinges of yellow-brown on the inner whorl. The shell has a maximum diameter of 28mm and is positioned towards the tail of the body. The shell is thin, light weight and moderately flexible and comprised mostly of conchin [1]. 

Victaphanta compacta is regarded as Endangered species os the IUCN Red List [2].

Snail Consumes Worm With Frightening Efficiency

by Lisa Winter

Powelliphanta is a genus of carnivorous land snails from New Zealand, who are also known as amber snails. They can grow to be 91 mm (3.6 in) long, about the size of a fist. Earthworms are a staple of amber snail’s diets though it doesn’t seem like it should be much of a match-up. Worms are really slippery and wiggly and snails are pretty slow, right? So how do the snails capture their prey? …

(read more: I Fucking Love Science)

How a Few Species Are Hacking Climate Change
Animals can be surprisingly adaptable—but can they change quickly enough?
by Emma Marris
As the Earth heats up, animals and plants are not necessarily helpless. They can move to cooler climes; they can stay put and adapt as individuals to their warmer environment, and they can even adapt as a species, by evolving.
The big question is, will they be able to do any of that quickly enough? Most researchers believe that climate change is happening too fast for many species to keep up. 
But in recent weeks, the general gloom has been pierced by two rays of hope: Reports have come in of unexpected adaptive ability in endangered butterflies in California and in corals in the Pacific&#8230;
(read more: National Geo)
image:  Francesco Tomasinelli, Visuals Unlimited/Corbis

How a Few Species Are Hacking Climate Change

Animals can be surprisingly adaptable—but can they change quickly enough?

by Emma Marris

As the Earth heats up, animals and plants are not necessarily helpless. They can move to cooler climes; they can stay put and adapt as individuals to their warmer environment, and they can even adapt as a species, by evolving.

The big question is, will they be able to do any of that quickly enough? Most researchers believe that climate change is happening too fast for many species to keep up.

But in recent weeks, the general gloom has been pierced by two rays of hope: Reports have come in of unexpected adaptive ability in endangered butterflies in California and in corals in the Pacific…

(read more: National Geo)

image:  Francesco Tomasinelli, Visuals Unlimited/Corbis

libutron
libutron:

Green snail - Rhinocochlis nasuta | ©Paul Bertner   (Mt. Kinabalu National Park, Sabah, Borneo)
Rhinocochlis nasuta (Dyakiidae) is an elegant land snail known from Borneo, with a compressed and small shell up to 24 mm.
The shell of this snail is levorotatory or sinistral, this means that the direction of rotation of the shell around its axis occurs in counterclockwise, so if the shell is placed with the apex upward then the opening of the shell is to the left side.
As the common name indicates, the body of the animal is of a bright green color, however, the shell is actually milky white, but is observed green because it is very thin and translucent.
[Source]

libutron:

Green snail - Rhinocochlis nasuta | ©Paul Bertner   (Mt. Kinabalu National Park, Sabah, Borneo)

Rhinocochlis nasuta (Dyakiidae) is an elegant land snail known from Borneo, with a compressed and small shell up to 24 mm.

The shell of this snail is levorotatory or sinistral, this means that the direction of rotation of the shell around its axis occurs in counterclockwise, so if the shell is placed with the apex upward then the opening of the shell is to the left side.

As the common name indicates, the body of the animal is of a bright green color, however, the shell is actually milky white, but is observed green because it is very thin and translucent.

[Source]

Five views of a shell of the Giant Tun Snail - Tonna galea, a species of marine gastropod mollusc in the family Tonnidae. The shell is very large, with an average height of 6 in (150 mm), but thin and inflated (though durable); as such, the shell weighs considerably less than comparable gastropod shells.

top - from left to right: Dorsal, lateral (right side), ventral, back, and front view.

  Photographs: H. Zell; edit: Heinrich Pniok and Vouliagmeni

(via: Wikipedia)

libutron
libutron:

Tiger Egg Cowrie - Cuspivolva tigris | ©Ülar Tikk   (Lembeh, Indonesia)
This beauty is a live Cuspivolva tigris (Gastropoda - Ovulidae), showing the brightly colored mantle covering the shell and the siphon (left side).
The siphon is an anterior extension of the mantle, through which water is drawn into the mantle cavity and over the gill for respiration. 
The mantle is orange-yellow and has black patches with white border, due to this and the ovoid shape of the shell, this species is commonly known as Tigger egg cowrie.

libutron:

Tiger Egg Cowrie - Cuspivolva tigris | ©Ülar Tikk   (Lembeh, Indonesia)

This beauty is a live Cuspivolva tigris (Gastropoda - Ovulidae), showing the brightly colored mantle covering the shell and the siphon (left side).

The siphon is an anterior extension of the mantle, through which water is drawn into the mantle cavity and over the gill for respiration. 

The mantle is orange-yellow and has black patches with white border, due to this and the ovoid shape of the shell, this species is commonly known as Tigger egg cowrie.

Time May Be Running Out for These Gorgeous Jewel-Like Snails

by Nadia Drake

Tiny tropical snails with beautiful, jewel-like shells are going extinct almost as fast as scientists can discover them. The minute mollusks, which average just 1 to 3 millimeters long, are members of the genus Plectostoma. Their shells are elaborate and irregularly coiled, unlike the snail shells we’re used to seeing.

Plectostoma make their homes on the lichens and moss that cover limestone hills of peninsular Malaysia and other parts of southeast Asia; they don’t get around that much, so it’s not uncommon for different hills to host separate species that are found only on that one hill, say the scientists who published a report documenting 31 species of spectacular snails, including 10 previously undescribed, today in Zookeys. The team used old collections, new observations, and CT scans of shell shapes to determine which snails belonged to which species…

(read more: Wired Science)

photographs by Thor-Seng Liew

Cone snail drug 100x more potent than morphine
by  AG Staff 
A new drug from cone snail venom could offer hope to chronic pain sufferers
AN EXPERIMENTAL DRUG made from cone snail venom has shown early signs of promise in numbing pain, raising hopes in the hunt for new, non-addictive medications, an Australian researcher says.
The drug, which has not been tested yet on humans, is judged to be about 100 times more potent than morphine or gabapentin, which are currently considered the gold standard for chronic nerve pain.
The active ingredient, conotoxin, comes from carnivorous cone snails, which are common in the western Pacific and Indian Ocean&#8230;
 (via: Australian Geographic) 
image: Australian cone snail (Conus textile), with proboscis extended and poised for attack. Image Credit: AAP Image/Melbourne University/David Paul

Cone snail drug 100x more potent than morphine

by  AG Staff

A new drug from cone snail venom could offer hope to chronic pain sufferers

AN EXPERIMENTAL DRUG made from cone snail venom has shown early signs of promise in numbing pain, raising hopes in the hunt for new, non-addictive medications, an Australian researcher says.

The drug, which has not been tested yet on humans, is judged to be about 100 times more potent than morphine or gabapentin, which are currently considered the gold standard for chronic nerve pain.

The active ingredient, conotoxin, comes from carnivorous cone snails, which are common in the western Pacific and Indian Ocean…

(via: Australian Geographic)

image: Australian cone snail (Conus textile), with proboscis extended and poised for attack. Image Credit: AAP Image/Melbourne University/David Paul