libutron
libutron:

Green snail - Rhinocochlis nasuta | ©Paul Bertner   (Mt. Kinabalu National Park, Sabah, Borneo)
Rhinocochlis nasuta (Dyakiidae) is an elegant land snail known from Borneo, with a compressed and small shell up to 24 mm.
The shell of this snail is levorotatory or sinistral, this means that the direction of rotation of the shell around its axis occurs in counterclockwise, so if the shell is placed with the apex upward then the opening of the shell is to the left side.
As the common name indicates, the body of the animal is of a bright green color, however, the shell is actually milky white, but is observed green because it is very thin and translucent.
[Source]

libutron:

Green snail - Rhinocochlis nasuta | ©Paul Bertner   (Mt. Kinabalu National Park, Sabah, Borneo)

Rhinocochlis nasuta (Dyakiidae) is an elegant land snail known from Borneo, with a compressed and small shell up to 24 mm.

The shell of this snail is levorotatory or sinistral, this means that the direction of rotation of the shell around its axis occurs in counterclockwise, so if the shell is placed with the apex upward then the opening of the shell is to the left side.

As the common name indicates, the body of the animal is of a bright green color, however, the shell is actually milky white, but is observed green because it is very thin and translucent.

[Source]

Five views of a shell of the Giant Tun Snail - Tonna galea, a species of marine gastropod mollusc in the family Tonnidae. The shell is very large, with an average height of 6 in (150 mm), but thin and inflated (though durable); as such, the shell weighs considerably less than comparable gastropod shells.

top - from left to right: Dorsal, lateral (right side), ventral, back, and front view.

  Photographs: H. Zell; edit: Heinrich Pniok and Vouliagmeni

(via: Wikipedia)

libutron
libutron:

Tiger Egg Cowrie - Cuspivolva tigris | ©Ülar Tikk   (Lembeh, Indonesia)
This beauty is a live Cuspivolva tigris (Gastropoda - Ovulidae), showing the brightly colored mantle covering the shell and the siphon (left side).
The siphon is an anterior extension of the mantle, through which water is drawn into the mantle cavity and over the gill for respiration. 
The mantle is orange-yellow and has black patches with white border, due to this and the ovoid shape of the shell, this species is commonly known as Tigger egg cowrie.

libutron:

Tiger Egg Cowrie - Cuspivolva tigris | ©Ülar Tikk   (Lembeh, Indonesia)

This beauty is a live Cuspivolva tigris (Gastropoda - Ovulidae), showing the brightly colored mantle covering the shell and the siphon (left side).

The siphon is an anterior extension of the mantle, through which water is drawn into the mantle cavity and over the gill for respiration. 

The mantle is orange-yellow and has black patches with white border, due to this and the ovoid shape of the shell, this species is commonly known as Tigger egg cowrie.

Time May Be Running Out for These Gorgeous Jewel-Like Snails

by Nadia Drake

Tiny tropical snails with beautiful, jewel-like shells are going extinct almost as fast as scientists can discover them. The minute mollusks, which average just 1 to 3 millimeters long, are members of the genus Plectostoma. Their shells are elaborate and irregularly coiled, unlike the snail shells we’re used to seeing.

Plectostoma make their homes on the lichens and moss that cover limestone hills of peninsular Malaysia and other parts of southeast Asia; they don’t get around that much, so it’s not uncommon for different hills to host separate species that are found only on that one hill, say the scientists who published a report documenting 31 species of spectacular snails, including 10 previously undescribed, today in Zookeys. The team used old collections, new observations, and CT scans of shell shapes to determine which snails belonged to which species…

(read more: Wired Science)

photographs by Thor-Seng Liew

Cone snail drug 100x more potent than morphine
by  AG Staff 
A new drug from cone snail venom could offer hope to chronic pain sufferers
AN EXPERIMENTAL DRUG made from cone snail venom has shown early signs of promise in numbing pain, raising hopes in the hunt for new, non-addictive medications, an Australian researcher says.
The drug, which has not been tested yet on humans, is judged to be about 100 times more potent than morphine or gabapentin, which are currently considered the gold standard for chronic nerve pain.
The active ingredient, conotoxin, comes from carnivorous cone snails, which are common in the western Pacific and Indian Ocean…
 (via: Australian Geographic) 
image: Australian cone snail (Conus textile), with proboscis extended and poised for attack. Image Credit: AAP Image/Melbourne University/David Paul

Cone snail drug 100x more potent than morphine

by  AG Staff

A new drug from cone snail venom could offer hope to chronic pain sufferers

AN EXPERIMENTAL DRUG made from cone snail venom has shown early signs of promise in numbing pain, raising hopes in the hunt for new, non-addictive medications, an Australian researcher says.

The drug, which has not been tested yet on humans, is judged to be about 100 times more potent than morphine or gabapentin, which are currently considered the gold standard for chronic nerve pain.

The active ingredient, conotoxin, comes from carnivorous cone snails, which are common in the western Pacific and Indian Ocean…

(via: Australian Geographic)

image: Australian cone snail (Conus textile), with proboscis extended and poised for attack. Image Credit: AAP Image/Melbourne University/David Paul

astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

Emerald Green Snail (Papustyla pulcherrima)

Also known as the Green Tree Snail or Manus Green Tree Snail, the emerald green snail is a species of terrestrial camaenid gastropod that is endemic to Manus Island in Papua New Guinea. Emerald green snails typically inhabit rain forests and are usually found in trees.

Although Papustyla pulcherrima is listed as Data Deficient by the IUCN it faces severe threats due to overharvesting for commercial purposes and habitat loss.

Classification

Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-Heterobranchia-Euthyneura-Panpulmonata-Eupulmonata-Stylommatophora-Sigmurethra-Helicoidea-Camaenidae-Papustyla-P. pulcherrima

Images: Dennis Hill and Tim Ross

astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Cymbal Bubble Snail" (Haminoea cymbalum)

…a species of haminoeid bubble snail (Haminoeidae) that is widely distributed throughout the Indo-Pacific, reaching as far east as Hawaii and as far west as the Indo-West Pacific. Cymbal bubble snails are chiefly diurnal and are mainly seen in tide pools and other rocky habitats. They are also herbivores and feed mainly on algae. If threatened H. cymbalum can secrete a metabolite which is a deterrent for many carnivorous fish. 

Classification

Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-Heterobranchia-Euthyneura-Euopishthobranchia-Cephalaspidea-Hamineoidea-Haminoeidae-Haminoea-H. cymbalum

Images: Green Slash and Cory Pittman

In New Study, Scientists Propose That a Handful of Species Types Are Key Are to Ecosystem Health
by Ariel Mark
While conducting field research in the humid salt marshes of Sapelo Island, scientists Marc Hensel and Brian Silliman made an astonishing discovery: species type, not just quantity, is vital for maintaining healthy ecosystems.
For decades, scientists believed that preserving the largest number of species was critical for ecosystem function, regardless of their genetic makeup. However, Hensel, a PhD student at the University of Massachusetts at Boston, and Silliman, Rachel Carson Associate Professor at Duke University, counter the old dogma in an article recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
By examining the relationships among three dominant consumer species (i.e., grazers and predators), Hensel and Silliamn found that it isn’t just the number of total species, but the number of specific species that is crucial to upholding ecosystem performance.
Working in the cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) dominated salt marshes of Sapelo Island in the Southeastern U.S. state of Georgia, the researchers measured the effect of species loss on ecosystem performance. Salt marshes are seemingly simple ecosystems composed of a few extremely abundant and influential species…
(read more: MongaBay)
photograph of marsh periwinkle snail (Litoraria irrorata)by Mary Hollinger

In New Study, Scientists Propose That a Handful of Species Types Are Key Are to Ecosystem Health

by Ariel Mark

While conducting field research in the humid salt marshes of Sapelo Island, scientists Marc Hensel and Brian Silliman made an astonishing discovery: species type, not just quantity, is vital for maintaining healthy ecosystems.

For decades, scientists believed that preserving the largest number of species was critical for ecosystem function, regardless of their genetic makeup. However, Hensel, a PhD student at the University of Massachusetts at Boston, and Silliman, Rachel Carson Associate Professor at Duke University, counter the old dogma in an article recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

By examining the relationships among three dominant consumer species (i.e., grazers and predators), Hensel and Silliamn found that it isn’t just the number of total species, but the number of specific species that is crucial to upholding ecosystem performance.

Working in the cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) dominated salt marshes of Sapelo Island in the Southeastern U.S. state of Georgia, the researchers measured the effect of species loss on ecosystem performance. Salt marshes are seemingly simple ecosystems composed of a few extremely abundant and influential species…

(read more: MongaBay)

photograph of marsh periwinkle snail (Litoraria irrorata)by Mary Hollinger