astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

"Hebrew Volute" (Voluta ebraea)
…a species of volute (Volutidae) which is endemic to north and northeastern Brazil (I have no idea why its called Hebrew) where it occupy the littoral zone, generally in areas with coral and rocks. Like other volutids Hebrew volutes are carnivorous/predatory and will feed on other gastropods and bivalves (notably Trachycardium muricatum and Stramontia haemastoma)
Classification
Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-Caenogastropoda-Hypsogastropoda-Neogastropoda-Muricoidea-Volutidae-Voluta-V. ebraea
Image: Thelma Lúcia Pereira Dias

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Hebrew Volute" (Voluta ebraea)

…a species of volute (Volutidae) which is endemic to north and northeastern Brazil (I have no idea why its called Hebrew) where it occupy the littoral zone, generally in areas with coral and rocks. Like other volutids Hebrew volutes are carnivorous/predatory and will feed on other gastropods and bivalves (notably Trachycardium muricatum and Stramontia haemastoma)

Classification

Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-Caenogastropoda-Hypsogastropoda-Neogastropoda-Muricoidea-Volutidae-Voluta-V. ebraea

Image: Thelma Lúcia Pereira Dias

Redwood National and State Parks - CA, USA
Keep your eyes out for our local predatory snail, the robust lancetooth (Haplotrema vancouverense). 
Sometimes known as an albino snail for its pearly-white body, this snail is a true carnivore who devours slugs, earthworms, millipedes, and even other snails. The snail’s name comes from the extra-long and extra-sharp teeth on its radula, the tough, sandpapery tongue it uses to eat. 
This particular robust lancetooth was caught redhanded in the middle of the trail enjoying a meal of its less fortunate kin. Proof positive that big things can come in small packages!

Keep your eyes out for our local predatory snail, the robust lancetooth (Haplotrema vancouverense).

Sometimes known as an albino snail for its pearly-white body, this snail is a true carnivore who devours slugs, earthworms, millipedes, and even other snails. The snail’s name comes from the extra-long and extra-sharp teeth on its radula, the tough, sandpapery tongue it uses to eat.

This particular robust lancetooth was caught redhanded in the middle of the trail enjoying a meal of its less fortunate kin. Proof positive that big things can come in small packages!

Semen Says:
Scientists report for the first time that a snail’s seminal fluid proteins can suppress the mating success of the male side of its hermaphroditic partner.
by Rina Shaikh-Lesko
Although copulation is often brief, males of many animal species leave a lasting impression on their mates. The seminal fluid they deposit contains not just sperm, but proteins that can alter the physiology and behavior of the female, often in ways that hurt the paternal success of her subsequent mates.
Among hermaphrodites—animals with both male and female reproductive organs—mates themselves are potential competitors, too, and copulation gives seminal fluid proteins the unique opportunity to directly manipulate the recipient’s male as well as female function.
Ovipostatin, a seminal fluid protein (SFP) in the hermaphroditic freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis, cuts egg production in half in the sperm recipient, according to a 2010 study led by Joris Koene of VU University Amsterdam in the Netherlands.
It’s been theorized that SFPs might also affect the sperm-producing capacity of recipient snails—their maleness—to reduce competition within a population. “It had been predicted … more than 30 years ago, but no one had properly tested it,” says Koene…
(read more: The Scientist)
illustration: © Scott Leighton

Semen Says:

Scientists report for the first time that a snail’s seminal fluid proteins can suppress the mating success of the male side of its hermaphroditic partner.

by Rina Shaikh-Lesko

Although copulation is often brief, males of many animal species leave a lasting impression on their mates. The seminal fluid they deposit contains not just sperm, but proteins that can alter the physiology and behavior of the female, often in ways that hurt the paternal success of her subsequent mates.

Among hermaphrodites—animals with both male and female reproductive organs—mates themselves are potential competitors, too, and copulation gives seminal fluid proteins the unique opportunity to directly manipulate the recipient’s male as well as female function.

Ovipostatin, a seminal fluid protein (SFP) in the hermaphroditic freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis, cuts egg production in half in the sperm recipient, according to a 2010 study led by Joris Koene of VU University Amsterdam in the Netherlands.

It’s been theorized that SFPs might also affect the sperm-producing capacity of recipient snails—their maleness—to reduce competition within a population. “It had been predicted … more than 30 years ago, but no one had properly tested it,” says Koene…

(read more: The Scientist)

illustration: © Scott Leighton

astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Cymatium lotorium
…is a species of triton (Ranellidae) which is widely distributed throughout the Indo-Pacific oceans. Like other tritons Cymantium lotorium is a predator and will feed on echinoderms and other molluscs by gripping them with its muscular foot and using its radula to saw through their hard shells/skin. Once it has finished “drilling” it will inject a paralyzing saliva into the prey which subdues the prey allowing C. lotorium to feed at its leisure. 
Classification
Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-Caenogastropoda-Hypsogastropoda-Littorinimorpha-Tonnoidea-Ranellidae-Ranellinae-Cymatium-C. lotorium
Image: George Chernilvsky 

astronomy-to-zoology:

Cymatium lotorium

…is a species of triton (Ranellidae) which is widely distributed throughout the Indo-Pacific oceans. Like other tritons Cymantium lotorium is a predator and will feed on echinoderms and other molluscs by gripping them with its muscular foot and using its radula to saw through their hard shells/skin. Once it has finished “drilling” it will inject a paralyzing saliva into the prey which subdues the prey allowing C. lotorium to feed at its leisure. 

Classification

Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-Caenogastropoda-Hypsogastropoda-Littorinimorpha-Tonnoidea-Ranellidae-Ranellinae-Cymatium-C. lotorium

Image: George Chernilvsky 

paisleywitch-deactivated2014061

tervaneula:

MORE SNAILS WHEEEEE we took new photos of them today with Piippu

These are Achatina fulica f. white jade, they can be found from this post over here as well. They are already adults! <3<3<3 Miss Universum is 8.5 cm and Riviera 8 cm in shell length. We had a third one, who is seen in the post I linked, but he never really grew and died just recently. Rest in peace, sweet little Invisible Man. ♥

But these two, I really really REALLY love them ahhh they’ve already been showing each other their love darts, I can’t wait for them to lay eggs! Though… there’s always a possibility that neither of them is fertile, but I won’t give up hope! SNAIL BABBIES IHIHIIIIII

alphynix

for-science-sake:

The Butterfly Snail (Limacina helicina) is a species of predatory swimming marine snail. They are a keystone species within Arctic pelagic ecosystems and are currently under serious threat.

They are being impacted by Ocean Acidification, due to pollution the ocean waters are becoming too acidic for survival. The corrosive waters off the West Coast of the U.S are dissolving the shells of these unique creatures and inevitably killing them. The decline of these will have major flow on effects to major marine ecosystems.

libutron
libutron:

Otway Black Snail | ©Ken J. Beath 
The Otway Black Snail, Victaphanta compacta (Rhytididae), is a carnivorous land snail, only found in wet forests and cool temperate rainforests in the Otway Ranges, Victoria, Australia. 

The body of the snail is grey-blue to black; the shell is spherical with four whorls and varies from a glossy dark brown to black with tinges of yellow-brown on the inner whorl. The shell has a maximum diameter of 28mm and is positioned towards the tail of the body. The shell is thin, light weight and moderately flexible and comprised mostly of conchin [1]. 
Victaphanta compacta is regarded as Endangered species os the IUCN Red List [2].

libutron:

Otway Black Snail | ©Ken J. Beath 

The Otway Black Snail, Victaphanta compacta (Rhytididae), is a carnivorous land snail, only found in wet forests and cool temperate rainforests in the Otway Ranges, Victoria, Australia. 

The body of the snail is grey-blue to black; the shell is spherical with four whorls and varies from a glossy dark brown to black with tinges of yellow-brown on the inner whorl. The shell has a maximum diameter of 28mm and is positioned towards the tail of the body. The shell is thin, light weight and moderately flexible and comprised mostly of conchin [1]. 

Victaphanta compacta is regarded as Endangered species os the IUCN Red List [2].

Snail Consumes Worm With Frightening Efficiency

by Lisa Winter

Powelliphanta is a genus of carnivorous land snails from New Zealand, who are also known as amber snails. They can grow to be 91 mm (3.6 in) long, about the size of a fist. Earthworms are a staple of amber snail’s diets though it doesn’t seem like it should be much of a match-up. Worms are really slippery and wiggly and snails are pretty slow, right? So how do the snails capture their prey? …

(read more: I Fucking Love Science)

How a Few Species Are Hacking Climate Change
Animals can be surprisingly adaptable—but can they change quickly enough?
by Emma Marris
As the Earth heats up, animals and plants are not necessarily helpless. They can move to cooler climes; they can stay put and adapt as individuals to their warmer environment, and they can even adapt as a species, by evolving.
The big question is, will they be able to do any of that quickly enough? Most researchers believe that climate change is happening too fast for many species to keep up. 
But in recent weeks, the general gloom has been pierced by two rays of hope: Reports have come in of unexpected adaptive ability in endangered butterflies in California and in corals in the Pacific&#8230;
(read more: National Geo)
image:  Francesco Tomasinelli, Visuals Unlimited/Corbis

How a Few Species Are Hacking Climate Change

Animals can be surprisingly adaptable—but can they change quickly enough?

by Emma Marris

As the Earth heats up, animals and plants are not necessarily helpless. They can move to cooler climes; they can stay put and adapt as individuals to their warmer environment, and they can even adapt as a species, by evolving.

The big question is, will they be able to do any of that quickly enough? Most researchers believe that climate change is happening too fast for many species to keep up.

But in recent weeks, the general gloom has been pierced by two rays of hope: Reports have come in of unexpected adaptive ability in endangered butterflies in California and in corals in the Pacific…

(read more: National Geo)

image:  Francesco Tomasinelli, Visuals Unlimited/Corbis

libutron
libutron:

Green snail - Rhinocochlis nasuta | ©Paul Bertner   (Mt. Kinabalu National Park, Sabah, Borneo)
Rhinocochlis nasuta (Dyakiidae) is an elegant land snail known from Borneo, with a compressed and small shell up to 24 mm.
The shell of this snail is levorotatory or sinistral, this means that the direction of rotation of the shell around its axis occurs in counterclockwise, so if the shell is placed with the apex upward then the opening of the shell is to the left side.
As the common name indicates, the body of the animal is of a bright green color, however, the shell is actually milky white, but is observed green because it is very thin and translucent.
[Source]

libutron:

Green snail - Rhinocochlis nasuta | ©Paul Bertner   (Mt. Kinabalu National Park, Sabah, Borneo)

Rhinocochlis nasuta (Dyakiidae) is an elegant land snail known from Borneo, with a compressed and small shell up to 24 mm.

The shell of this snail is levorotatory or sinistral, this means that the direction of rotation of the shell around its axis occurs in counterclockwise, so if the shell is placed with the apex upward then the opening of the shell is to the left side.

As the common name indicates, the body of the animal is of a bright green color, however, the shell is actually milky white, but is observed green because it is very thin and translucent.

[Source]