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Harlequin Toad - Atelopus spumarius barbotini
This is a toad endemic to the Central Massif of French Guiana. It can be easily distinguished from the other species of the Guianan region by its body color and the shape of its dorsal pattern. However, despite being very distinctive, the taxonomy of the species or subspecies is not fully resolved.
Formerly this toad was called Atelopus spumarius barbotini (Bufonidae), but it seems that populations of this form and another ones in the Atelopus spumarius group might be treated as a species complex, and it has not been cleared out how many and how they are related. 
Anyway, the species Atelopus spumarius, including its subspecies, is regarded as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Henk Wallays | Locality: Panama (2008)

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Harlequin Toad - Atelopus spumarius barbotini

This is a toad endemic to the Central Massif of French Guiana. It can be easily distinguished from the other species of the Guianan region by its body color and the shape of its dorsal pattern. However, despite being very distinctive, the taxonomy of the species or subspecies is not fully resolved.

Formerly this toad was called Atelopus spumarius barbotini (Bufonidae), but it seems that populations of this form and another ones in the Atelopus spumarius group might be treated as a species complex, and it has not been cleared out how many and how they are related. 

Anyway, the species Atelopus spumarius, including its subspecies, is regarded as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Henk Wallays | Locality: Panama (2008)

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The rare Latiffs Torrent-Dwelling Toad - Ansonia latiffi
Described in 2008, the Latiffs Torrent-Dwelling Toad, Ansonia latiffi (Bufonidae), is known to occur in Sungai Lembing, Gunug Benom, Ulu Tahan and Gunung Lawit, central and east Peninsular Malaysia.
Females are larger than males (females reaching 51 mm SVL, and males reaching 39.3 mm). The fingers are long, slender, lack webbing, and with tips rounded. The dorsal surface is granulous, nearly uniform brownish-red, with orangish-yellow spots on arms and legs.
Ansonia latiffi inhabits hilly, closed canopy forests, and is considered to be a rare species.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©M.A. Muin | Locality: Terengganu, Malaysia (2011)

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The rare Latiffs Torrent-Dwelling Toad - Ansonia latiffi

Described in 2008, the Latiffs Torrent-Dwelling Toad, Ansonia latiffi (Bufonidae), is known to occur in Sungai Lembing, Gunug Benom, Ulu Tahan and Gunung Lawit, central and east Peninsular Malaysia.

Females are larger than males (females reaching 51 mm SVL, and males reaching 39.3 mm). The fingers are long, slender, lack webbing, and with tips rounded. The dorsal surface is granulous, nearly uniform brownish-red, with orangish-yellow spots on arms and legs.

Ansonia latiffi inhabits hilly, closed canopy forests, and is considered to be a rare species.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©M.A. Muin | Locality: Terengganu, Malaysia (2011)

Removing Just a Few Trees Can Lower Tropical Animal Biodiversity
Selective logging can halve the number of species of mammals and amphibians in a forest
by Sarah Zielinski

It’s easy to understand how the clear-cutting of vast tracts of tropical forest might be bad. After all, the loss of all those trees is bound to also take out many of the animals that made that forest their home. So selective logging—in which just at most 20 trees are removed from a single hectare of land (10,000 square meters, about the size of two football fields)—would seem to be a no-brainer improvement.
But a new study published today in Current Biology is adding to evidence that this type of timber removal can still be destructive. Zuzana Burivalova of ETH Zurich and colleagues found that taking out just three or four trees in a hectare of tropical forest can halve the number of mammal species present. Logging six or seven trees can do the same to amphibians…
(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)
photo:This toad, Dendrophryniscus sp., lives in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. (© TIAGO QUEIROZ/dpa/Corbis)

Removing Just a Few Trees Can Lower Tropical Animal Biodiversity

Selective logging can halve the number of species of mammals and amphibians in a forest

by Sarah Zielinski

It’s easy to understand how the clear-cutting of vast tracts of tropical forest might be bad. After all, the loss of all those trees is bound to also take out many of the animals that made that forest their home. So selective logging—in which just at most 20 trees are removed from a single hectare of land (10,000 square meters, about the size of two football fields)—would seem to be a no-brainer improvement.

But a new study published today in Current Biology is adding to evidence that this type of timber removal can still be destructive. Zuzana Burivalova of ETH Zurich and colleagues found that taking out just three or four trees in a hectare of tropical forest can halve the number of mammal species present. Logging six or seven trees can do the same to amphibians…

(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)

photo:This toad, Dendrophryniscus sp., lives in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. (© TIAGO QUEIROZ/dpa/Corbis)

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Pirre Harlequin frog  (Pirri Range Stubfoot Toad)
Actually the Pirre Harlequin frog is not a frog but a toad of the species Atelopus glyphus (Bufonidae), found in eastern Panama, in the Serranía de Pirre, and Colombia, in the Chocó.
Atelopus glyphus is currently classified as a Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red List, since like other species within the genus, their populations are being severely affected the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis that causes chytridiomycosis disease.
Specimen pictured is a juvenile captive-bred as part of the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, an organization based in Panama, which is making significant efforts to establish colonies of the harlequin frogs and develop methods to reduce the impact of chytrid fungus, so that one day the captive amphibians may be reintroduced to their habitat.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Brian Gratwicke | Locality: Panama

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Pirre Harlequin frog  (Pirri Range Stubfoot Toad)

Actually the Pirre Harlequin frog is not a frog but a toad of the species Atelopus glyphus (Bufonidae), found in eastern Panama, in the Serranía de Pirre, and Colombia, in the Chocó.

Atelopus glyphus is currently classified as a Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red List, since like other species within the genus, their populations are being severely affected the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis that causes chytridiomycosis disease.

Specimen pictured is a juvenile captive-bred as part of the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, an organization based in Panama, which is making significant efforts to establish colonies of the harlequin frogs and develop methods to reduce the impact of chytrid fungus, so that one day the captive amphibians may be reintroduced to their habitat.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Brian Gratwicke | Locality: Panama

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River Toad  (Rough Toad, Giant Asian Toad, Kodok Buduk Sungal, Kodok Puru Besar)
Bufo asper, Syn. Phrynoidis aspera (Bufonidae), is an Asian toad with large and stout body (100-140mm snout-vent length). The skin is covered with warts or tubercles; so the name of this species derives from its rough skin texture.
This species occurs in Brunei Darussalam; Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar and Thailand. It is consumed for food in Sabah and peninsular Malaysia .
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Ingomar Kiehlmann
Locality: Bukit Larut, Malaysia

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River Toad  (Rough Toad, Giant Asian Toad, Kodok Buduk Sungal, Kodok Puru Besar)

Bufo asper, Syn. Phrynoidis aspera (Bufonidae), is an Asian toad with large and stout body (100-140mm snout-vent length). The skin is covered with warts or tubercles; so the name of this species derives from its rough skin texture.

This species occurs in Brunei Darussalam; Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar and Thailand. It is consumed for food in Sabah and peninsular Malaysia .

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Ingomar Kiehlmann

Locality: Bukit Larut, Malaysia

The male Panamanian Golden Frog (Atelopus zeteki) has a subtle way of attracting females… it waves. This friendly gesture can arouse the attention of a rival male, which often ends in a wrestling match.

* Since this footage was filmed, this species has gone extinct in the wild due to the deadly chytrid fungus. Conservationists now care for the last of this frog in various zoos and other institutions.

with David Attenborrough

(via: Nature - PBS)

The World’s Most Endangered Frogs:
Kihansi Spray Toad (Nectophrynoides asperginis)
Status: Extinct in the Wild
As its name suggests, the Kihansi Spray Toad was once found in the spray of the Kihansi Falls in Tanzania. It is now considered extinct in the wild. A hydroelectric dam built upstream of the falls is blamed for this decline. The dam cut off 90 percent of the original water flow, reducing the volume of spray around the falls and altering the vegetation.
(read more: Nature - PBS)
photo by Julie Larsen Maher/Wildlife Conservation Society

The World’s Most Endangered Frogs:

Kihansi Spray Toad (Nectophrynoides asperginis)

Status: Extinct in the Wild

As its name suggests, the Kihansi Spray Toad was once found in the spray of the Kihansi Falls in Tanzania. It is now considered extinct in the wild. A hydroelectric dam built upstream of the falls is blamed for this decline. The dam cut off 90 percent of the original water flow, reducing the volume of spray around the falls and altering the vegetation.

(read more: Nature - PBS)

photo by Julie Larsen Maher/Wildlife Conservation Society

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Kihansi spray toad (Nectophrynoides asperginis)
Extinct in the Wild
Nectophrynoides asperginis is endemic to the Kihansi Falls in eastern Tanzania. It is specially adapted to cope with the spray from the falls by having flaps covering the nostrils. It may also communicate with others visually, instead of calling, due to the noise of the falls. It is ovoviviparous, and gives birth to live young after the tadpoles develop while still inside the female. 
In 2000, a dam was built upstream of the habitat of N. asperginis, which greatly reduced the water flow and quality of the water. In 1999, there were an estimated 20,000 individuals in the Upper Spray Wetland, but it was declared extinct in the wild in 2009. 
Several facilities in the US have been breeding N. asperginis since 2000, when 499 toads were collected from the wild. By 2012, over 6000 had been raised and 2500 were reintroduced to Tanzania. Studies into this species’ diet, and the microclimate and vegetation of its habitat have helped to improve the chances of a successful reintroduction. 
Photo: Tim Herman on IUCN.

unknown-endangered:

Kihansi spray toad (Nectophrynoides asperginis)

Extinct in the Wild

Nectophrynoides asperginis is endemic to the Kihansi Falls in eastern Tanzania. It is specially adapted to cope with the spray from the falls by having flaps covering the nostrils. It may also communicate with others visually, instead of calling, due to the noise of the falls. It is ovoviviparous, and gives birth to live young after the tadpoles develop while still inside the female. 

In 2000, a dam was built upstream of the habitat of N. asperginis, which greatly reduced the water flow and quality of the water. In 1999, there were an estimated 20,000 individuals in the Upper Spray Wetland, but it was declared extinct in the wild in 2009. 

Several facilities in the US have been breeding N. asperginis since 2000, when 499 toads were collected from the wild. By 2012, over 6000 had been raised and 2500 were reintroduced to Tanzania. Studies into this species’ diet, and the microclimate and vegetation of its habitat have helped to improve the chances of a successful reintroduction. 

Photo: Tim Herman on IUCN.

Sunday Species Snapshot: Panamanian Golden Frog
by John R. Platt
These tiny, brightly colored amphibians pack a potent neurotoxin on their skin. That toxin protected them from predators, but it won’t save them from extinction. They haven’t been seen in the wild in seven years.
Species name: Panamanian golden frog (Atelopus zeteki). This is actually a misnomer. These “frogs” are actually toads!
Where found: The mountain ranges and streams of central Panama. Well, that’s where they used to be found…
IUCN Red List status: Officially they are still listed as critically endangered, but populations of this species have crashed so dramatically that they may actually be functionally extinct, if not already extinct, in the wild. The last documented frog in the wild was seen in 2007.
Major threat: Long protected under Panamanian law, the golden frogs have faced numerous threats ranging from deforestation to water pollution to the pet trade. But it was the arrival of the amphibian-killing disease chytridiomycosis in 2004 which effectively (and quite quickly) wiped out this species…
(read more: Scientific American)
image by Heather Paul via Flickr.

Sunday Species Snapshot: Panamanian Golden Frog

by John R. Platt

These tiny, brightly colored amphibians pack a potent neurotoxin on their skin. That toxin protected them from predators, but it won’t save them from extinction. They haven’t been seen in the wild in seven years.

Species name: Panamanian golden frog (Atelopus zeteki). This is actually a misnomer. These “frogs” are actually toads!

Where found: The mountain ranges and streams of central Panama. Well, that’s where they used to be found…

IUCN Red List status: Officially they are still listed as critically endangered, but populations of this species have crashed so dramatically that they may actually be functionally extinct, if not already extinct, in the wild. The last documented frog in the wild was seen in 2007.

Major threat: Long protected under Panamanian law, the golden frogs have faced numerous threats ranging from deforestation to water pollution to the pet trade. But it was the arrival of the amphibian-killing disease chytridiomycosis in 2004 which effectively (and quite quickly) wiped out this species…

(read more: Scientific American)

image by Heather Paul via Flickr.