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libutron:

Pirre Harlequin frog  (Pirri Range Stubfoot Toad)
Actually the Pirre Harlequin frog is not a frog but a toad of the species Atelopus glyphus (Bufonidae), found in eastern Panama, in the Serranía de Pirre, and Colombia, in the Chocó.
Atelopus glyphus is currently classified as a Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red List, since like other species within the genus, their populations are being severely affected the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis that causes chytridiomycosis disease.
Specimen pictured is a juvenile captive-bred as part of the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, an organization based in Panama, which is making significant efforts to establish colonies of the harlequin frogs and develop methods to reduce the impact of chytrid fungus, so that one day the captive amphibians may be reintroduced to their habitat.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Brian Gratwicke | Locality: Panama

libutron:

Pirre Harlequin frog  (Pirri Range Stubfoot Toad)

Actually the Pirre Harlequin frog is not a frog but a toad of the species Atelopus glyphus (Bufonidae), found in eastern Panama, in the Serranía de Pirre, and Colombia, in the Chocó.

Atelopus glyphus is currently classified as a Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red List, since like other species within the genus, their populations are being severely affected the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis that causes chytridiomycosis disease.

Specimen pictured is a juvenile captive-bred as part of the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, an organization based in Panama, which is making significant efforts to establish colonies of the harlequin frogs and develop methods to reduce the impact of chytrid fungus, so that one day the captive amphibians may be reintroduced to their habitat.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Brian Gratwicke | Locality: Panama

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River Toad  (Rough Toad, Giant Asian Toad, Kodok Buduk Sungal, Kodok Puru Besar)
Bufo asper, Syn. Phrynoidis aspera (Bufonidae), is an Asian toad with large and stout body (100-140mm snout-vent length). The skin is covered with warts or tubercles; so the name of this species derives from its rough skin texture.
This species occurs in Brunei Darussalam; Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar and Thailand. It is consumed for food in Sabah and peninsular Malaysia .
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Ingomar Kiehlmann
Locality: Bukit Larut, Malaysia

libutron:

River Toad  (Rough Toad, Giant Asian Toad, Kodok Buduk Sungal, Kodok Puru Besar)

Bufo asper, Syn. Phrynoidis aspera (Bufonidae), is an Asian toad with large and stout body (100-140mm snout-vent length). The skin is covered with warts or tubercles; so the name of this species derives from its rough skin texture.

This species occurs in Brunei Darussalam; Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar and Thailand. It is consumed for food in Sabah and peninsular Malaysia .

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Ingomar Kiehlmann

Locality: Bukit Larut, Malaysia

The male Panamanian Golden Frog (Atelopus zeteki) has a subtle way of attracting females… it waves. This friendly gesture can arouse the attention of a rival male, which often ends in a wrestling match.

* Since this footage was filmed, this species has gone extinct in the wild due to the deadly chytrid fungus. Conservationists now care for the last of this frog in various zoos and other institutions.

with David Attenborrough

(via: Nature - PBS)

The World’s Most Endangered Frogs:
Kihansi Spray Toad (Nectophrynoides asperginis)
Status: Extinct in the Wild
As its name suggests, the Kihansi Spray Toad was once found in the spray of the Kihansi Falls in Tanzania. It is now considered extinct in the wild. A hydroelectric dam built upstream of the falls is blamed for this decline. The dam cut off 90 percent of the original water flow, reducing the volume of spray around the falls and altering the vegetation.
(read more: Nature - PBS)
photo by Julie Larsen Maher/Wildlife Conservation Society

The World’s Most Endangered Frogs:

Kihansi Spray Toad (Nectophrynoides asperginis)

Status: Extinct in the Wild

As its name suggests, the Kihansi Spray Toad was once found in the spray of the Kihansi Falls in Tanzania. It is now considered extinct in the wild. A hydroelectric dam built upstream of the falls is blamed for this decline. The dam cut off 90 percent of the original water flow, reducing the volume of spray around the falls and altering the vegetation.

(read more: Nature - PBS)

photo by Julie Larsen Maher/Wildlife Conservation Society

unknown-endangered
unknown-endangered:

Kihansi spray toad (Nectophrynoides asperginis)
Extinct in the Wild
Nectophrynoides asperginis is endemic to the Kihansi Falls in eastern Tanzania. It is specially adapted to cope with the spray from the falls by having flaps covering the nostrils. It may also communicate with others visually, instead of calling, due to the noise of the falls. It is ovoviviparous, and gives birth to live young after the tadpoles develop while still inside the female. 
In 2000, a dam was built upstream of the habitat of N. asperginis, which greatly reduced the water flow and quality of the water. In 1999, there were an estimated 20,000 individuals in the Upper Spray Wetland, but it was declared extinct in the wild in 2009. 
Several facilities in the US have been breeding N. asperginis since 2000, when 499 toads were collected from the wild. By 2012, over 6000 had been raised and 2500 were reintroduced to Tanzania. Studies into this species’ diet, and the microclimate and vegetation of its habitat have helped to improve the chances of a successful reintroduction. 
Photo: Tim Herman on IUCN.

unknown-endangered:

Kihansi spray toad (Nectophrynoides asperginis)

Extinct in the Wild

Nectophrynoides asperginis is endemic to the Kihansi Falls in eastern Tanzania. It is specially adapted to cope with the spray from the falls by having flaps covering the nostrils. It may also communicate with others visually, instead of calling, due to the noise of the falls. It is ovoviviparous, and gives birth to live young after the tadpoles develop while still inside the female. 

In 2000, a dam was built upstream of the habitat of N. asperginis, which greatly reduced the water flow and quality of the water. In 1999, there were an estimated 20,000 individuals in the Upper Spray Wetland, but it was declared extinct in the wild in 2009. 

Several facilities in the US have been breeding N. asperginis since 2000, when 499 toads were collected from the wild. By 2012, over 6000 had been raised and 2500 were reintroduced to Tanzania. Studies into this species’ diet, and the microclimate and vegetation of its habitat have helped to improve the chances of a successful reintroduction. 

Photo: Tim Herman on IUCN.

Sunday Species Snapshot: Panamanian Golden Frog
by John R. Platt
These tiny, brightly colored amphibians pack a potent neurotoxin on their skin. That toxin protected them from predators, but it won’t save them from extinction. They haven’t been seen in the wild in seven years.
Species name: Panamanian golden frog (Atelopus zeteki). This is actually a misnomer. These “frogs” are actually toads!
Where found: The mountain ranges and streams of central Panama. Well, that’s where they used to be found…
IUCN Red List status: Officially they are still listed as critically endangered, but populations of this species have crashed so dramatically that they may actually be functionally extinct, if not already extinct, in the wild. The last documented frog in the wild was seen in 2007.
Major threat: Long protected under Panamanian law, the golden frogs have faced numerous threats ranging from deforestation to water pollution to the pet trade. But it was the arrival of the amphibian-killing disease chytridiomycosis in 2004 which effectively (and quite quickly) wiped out this species…
(read more: Scientific American)
image by Heather Paul via Flickr.

Sunday Species Snapshot: Panamanian Golden Frog

by John R. Platt

These tiny, brightly colored amphibians pack a potent neurotoxin on their skin. That toxin protected them from predators, but it won’t save them from extinction. They haven’t been seen in the wild in seven years.

Species name: Panamanian golden frog (Atelopus zeteki). This is actually a misnomer. These “frogs” are actually toads!

Where found: The mountain ranges and streams of central Panama. Well, that’s where they used to be found…

IUCN Red List status: Officially they are still listed as critically endangered, but populations of this species have crashed so dramatically that they may actually be functionally extinct, if not already extinct, in the wild. The last documented frog in the wild was seen in 2007.

Major threat: Long protected under Panamanian law, the golden frogs have faced numerous threats ranging from deforestation to water pollution to the pet trade. But it was the arrival of the amphibian-killing disease chytridiomycosis in 2004 which effectively (and quite quickly) wiped out this species…

(read more: Scientific American)

image by Heather Paul via Flickr.

Rediscovery of a “Lost” Andean Toad after 43 year disappearance

Scientists discover a relict population of bizarre toads in rapidly disappearing cloud forests of northwest Ecuador

A team of U.S. and Ecuadorian scientists working in the remote cloud forests of northwest Ecuador with the international non-profit The Biodiversity Group have rediscovered a population of the once thought extinct Tandayapa Andean Toad (Andinophryne olallai). The rediscovery, reported in an article published in the open-access journal Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, marks the first time the species has been seen in 43 years and sheds light on the species natural history and conservation status for the first time. The study is authored by scientists from The Biodiversity Group, Museo de Zoología of Catholic University of Ecuador and the local community organization Manduriacu Cooperative.

The toad genus Andinophryne is made up of three barely-studied and endangered species restricted to Andean cloud forests of western Ecuador and Colombia. Of the three species, the Tandayapa Andean Toad is the least known, with the only previous observation being the individual from the original species description from Tandayapa, Ecuador in 1970. Its scarcity earned the species a spot on the World’s “Lost Frogs” List by Conservation International…

(read more: http://www.amphibians.org/news/andinophryne-discovery)

photos by Santiago R. Ron; adult - top and juvenile - bttm

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shychemist:

Rhinela yunga: New Poisonous Toad Species Found in Peru

The new species, named Rhinella yunga, belongs to Bufonidae – a large toad family composed of more than 30 genera.
These toads have a warty, robust body and a pair of large poison parotoid glands on the back of their heads.
The poison is excreted by the toads when stressed as a protective mechanism. Some toads are more toxic than others.
Males also possess a special organ, which after removing of testes becomes an active ovary and the toad, in effect, becomes female.
Like many other Bufonidae toads, Rhinella yunga has a cryptic body coloration resembling the decaying leaves in the forest floor, which is in combination with expanded cranial crests and bony protrusions cleverly securing perfect camouflage…
(read more)

shychemist:

Rhinela yunga: New Poisonous Toad Species Found in Peru

The new species, named Rhinella yunga, belongs to Bufonidae – a large toad family composed of more than 30 genera.

These toads have a warty, robust body and a pair of large poison parotoid glands on the back of their heads.

The poison is excreted by the toads when stressed as a protective mechanism. Some toads are more toxic than others.

Males also possess a special organ, which after removing of testes becomes an active ovary and the toad, in effect, becomes female.

Like many other Bufonidae toads, Rhinella yunga has a cryptic body coloration resembling the decaying leaves in the forest floor, which is in combination with expanded cranial crests and bony protrusions cleverly securing perfect camouflage…

(read more)