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Carolina Diamondback Terrapin - Malaclemys terrapin centrata
An attractive adult male of the Carolina Diamondback Terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin centrata (Testudines - Emydidae), a subspecies found from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to northern Florida, in the United States.
Reference: [1] 
Photo credit: ©Kevin Stohlgren | Locality: Glynn Co., Georgia, US (2013)

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Carolina Diamondback Terrapin - Malaclemys terrapin centrata

An attractive adult male of the Carolina Diamondback Terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin centrata (Testudines - Emydidae), a subspecies found from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to northern Florida, in the United States.

Reference: [1

Photo credit: ©Kevin Stohlgren | Locality: Glynn Co., Georgia, US (2013)

What an amazing find! 
A female Sundarbans River Terrapin (Batagur baska) was discovered in a family pond in Bangladesh. The turtle had been kept as a pet for 16 years. After much discussion, the turtle’s owner agreed to sell the critically endangered turtle to the team’s breeding colony, adding a seventh female and diversifying the genetic base! In this touching photo, the previous owner says good-bye to her beloved pet.
You can read more about this exceptional story here:
Turtle Survival Alliance

What an amazing find!

A female Sundarbans River Terrapin (Batagur baska) was discovered in a family pond in Bangladesh. The turtle had been kept as a pet for 16 years. After much discussion, the turtle’s owner agreed to sell the critically endangered turtle to the team’s breeding colony, adding a seventh female and diversifying the genetic base! In this touching photo, the previous owner says good-bye to her beloved pet.

You can read more about this exceptional story here:

Turtle Survival Alliance

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Chinese Pond Turtle
 The Chinese Pond Turtle (Mauremys reevesii) can be found in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and Korea. This species prefers slow moving aquatic habitats where it feeds on a variety of food. Its omnivorous diet consists of insect larvae, invertebrates, fish, carrion, algae and other aquatic plants. The Chinese Pond Turtle, also known as Reeves’ Turtle is endangered in the wild and is found in large numbers in farms in China where they are bred for the pet and food markets.
(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Chinese Pond Turtle

The Chinese Pond Turtle (Mauremys reevesii) can be found in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and Korea. This species prefers slow moving aquatic habitats where it feeds on a variety of food. Its omnivorous diet consists of insect larvae, invertebrates, fish, carrion, algae and other aquatic plants. The Chinese Pond Turtle, also known as Reeves’ Turtle is endangered in the wild and is found in large numbers in farms in China where they are bred for the pet and food markets.

(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Black Softshell Turtle 
The Black Softshell Turtle (Nilssonia nigricans) from Northeastern India and Bangladesh is a large species with a shell length that can reach 3 feet. Their coloration varies greatly with age. They are quite colorful as hatchlings and juveniles, but become a more uniform darker color as adults. 
They can be found in clear, slow moving rivers where they eat fish, shellfish and carrion. For many years this species was thought to only remain in a single artificial pond at a temple in Bangladesh (and was once though extinct in the wild). However, in recent years it has been confirmed in the wild at a few other localities. TSA is committed to increasing the population of this rare species through careful management and this year we are pleased to report that 44 turtles have hatched! 
Read more here: Turtle Survival Alliance

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Black Softshell Turtle

The Black Softshell Turtle (Nilssonia nigricans) from Northeastern India and Bangladesh is a large species with a shell length that can reach 3 feet. Their coloration varies greatly with age. They are quite colorful as hatchlings and juveniles, but become a more uniform darker color as adults.

They can be found in clear, slow moving rivers where they eat fish, shellfish and carrion. For many years this species was thought to only remain in a single artificial pond at a temple in Bangladesh (and was once though extinct in the wild). However, in recent years it has been confirmed in the wild at a few other localities. TSA is committed to increasing the population of this rare species through careful management and this year we are pleased to report that 44 turtles have hatched!

Read more here: Turtle Survival Alliance

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Bushmanland Tent Tortoise - Psammobates tentorius verroxii
Tent tortoises are amazing creatures with beautiful geometric patterns in the domed carapace that resembles bedouin tents. Among them, Psammobates tentorius verroxii (Testudinidae), with up to 145 mm in length, comes in a bewildering range of shapes and colors.
The Bushmanland Tent Tortoise often has the carapace uniformly russet or dark brown, but usually patterned with darker brown rays. The “Knoppies” (tents or raised scutes) are rarely developed, the shell is low, smooth and rounded.
This subspecies occurs and is widespread in South Africa and Namibia, however it remains among the most poorly known of the subcontinent’s tortoises.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©cowyeow | Locality: Near Jagersberg, South Africa (2007)

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Bushmanland Tent Tortoise - Psammobates tentorius verroxii

Tent tortoises are amazing creatures with beautiful geometric patterns in the domed carapace that resembles bedouin tents. Among them, Psammobates tentorius verroxii (Testudinidae), with up to 145 mm in length, comes in a bewildering range of shapes and colors.

The Bushmanland Tent Tortoise often has the carapace uniformly russet or dark brown, but usually patterned with darker brown rays. The “Knoppies” (tents or raised scutes) are rarely developed, the shell is low, smooth and rounded.

This subspecies occurs and is widespread in South Africa and Namibia, however it remains among the most poorly known of the subcontinent’s tortoises.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©cowyeow | Locality: Near Jagersberg, South Africa (2007)

cool-critters

cool-critters:

Spiny turtle (Heosemys spinosa)

The spiny turtle is known from Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. Sadly this species is highly endangered!

It inhabits lowland and hill rainforest, usually in the vicinity of small streams, mainly in hill areas up to 900 m above sea level.

Mating behaviour appears to be triggered by rain; in captivity, spraying males with water results in them chasing females and attempting to mount. Nothing is known of nesting behaviour in the wild.

photo credits: zooborns, myviadventures

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Radiated Tortoise - Astrochelys radiata
Now listed as Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red Lit, Astrochelys radiata (Testudinidae), endemic to the spiny forest of southern Madagascar, had virtually never been studied in the wild until the late 1990s.
Recent research projects and surveys have contributed to defining the extent of the decline of the species, and it now appears that A. radiata faces serious extinction risks unless current trends are halted.
This species is heavily harvested for food and for the pet trade. In wild mature females of this species produce up to three clutches per season with only 1–5 eggs per clutch, leading to an estimated average production of two clutches of four eggs each per breeding female.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Bernard Dupont | Locality: Toliara, Madagascar (2013)

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Radiated Tortoise - Astrochelys radiata

Now listed as Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red Lit, Astrochelys radiata (Testudinidae), endemic to the spiny forest of southern Madagascar, had virtually never been studied in the wild until the late 1990s.

Recent research projects and surveys have contributed to defining the extent of the decline of the species, and it now appears that A. radiata faces serious extinction risks unless current trends are halted.

This species is heavily harvested for food and for the pet trade. In wild mature females of this species produce up to three clutches per season with only 1–5 eggs per clutch, leading to an estimated average production of two clutches of four eggs each per breeding female.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Bernard Dupont | Locality: Toliara, Madagascar (2013)

Hey New Englanders: Baby Turtle Search and Release
Sponsored by Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary (Cape Cod, MA)
Sat, Sep 13, 2014 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Pre-registration required
In early September, turtle hatchlings come out of their eggshells. We’ll start with a story, then walk through several habitats at the sanctuary, hoping to see young turtles emerging from their nests or crawling on the trails, and possibly even aid in their release. We may see baby box turtles in the field, painted turtles at the pond, and diamondback terrapins in the salt marsh. Everyone will make a turtle craft to take home…
(read more: Mass Audubon)

Hey New Englanders: Baby Turtle Search and Release

Sponsored by Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary (Cape Cod, MA)

Sat, Sep 13, 2014 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Pre-registration required

In early September, turtle hatchlings come out of their eggshells. We’ll start with a story, then walk through several habitats at the sanctuary, hoping to see young turtles emerging from their nests or crawling on the trails, and possibly even aid in their release. We may see baby box turtles in the field, painted turtles at the pond, and diamondback terrapins in the salt marsh. Everyone will make a turtle craft to take home…

(read more: Mass Audubon)

TSA Tuesday: Loggerhead Musk Turtle 
 This week the spotlight is on the Loggerhead Musk Turtle (Sternotherus minor minor) which can be found in Central Florida, Georgia and Eastern Alabama. This shy species is highly aquatic, rarely leaving the water except to nest or occasionally bask on the knee of a cypress tree. They commonly inhabit clear limestone springs, rivers and streams. Their varied diet consists of aquatic insects, crayfish, plants, carrion, snails and mussels. 
* A juvenile is pictured.
(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

TSA Tuesday: Loggerhead Musk Turtle

This week the spotlight is on the Loggerhead Musk Turtle (Sternotherus minor minor) which can be found in Central Florida, Georgia and Eastern Alabama. This shy species is highly aquatic, rarely leaving the water except to nest or occasionally bask on the knee of a cypress tree. They commonly inhabit clear limestone springs, rivers and streams. Their varied diet consists of aquatic insects, crayfish, plants, carrion, snails and mussels.

* A juvenile is pictured.

(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)