TSA Turtle Tuesday:  Chinese Three-striped Box Turtle
 The critically endangered Chinese Three Striped Box Turtle (Cuora trifasciata) is native to southern China including Hainan Island and Hong Kong. It gets its common name from the three distinct black lines which run the length of its carapace. Its narrow and pointed head exhibits an array of colors, from yellow to olive-green on top to yellow-orange. This beautiful and rare turtle is highly sought after by the pet trade, with adults fetching up to $30,000 each. Conservation efforts are well underway to ensure the survival of the important species. 
read more about turtle conservation:
Turtle Survival Alliance: Turtles in Trouble

TSA Turtle Tuesday:  Chinese Three-striped Box Turtle

The critically endangered Chinese Three Striped Box Turtle (Cuora trifasciata) is native to southern China including Hainan Island and Hong Kong. It gets its common name from the three distinct black lines which run the length of its carapace. Its narrow and pointed head exhibits an array of colors, from yellow to olive-green on top to yellow-orange. This beautiful and rare turtle is highly sought after by the pet trade, with adults fetching up to $30,000 each. Conservation efforts are well underway to ensure the survival of the important species.

read more about turtle conservation:

Turtle Survival Alliance: Turtles in Trouble

The Turtle Hospital:  Bath time for Bender! This beautiful, adult female Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle is the rarest type of sea turtle in the world! In 2005, Bender became tangled in fishing line and was hit by a boat. Luckily, she was rescued and nursed back to health, but her injuries proved too severe for her to be safely returned to the wild.  Bender serves as an ambassador for her species and helps to educate thousands of visitors every year while in our permanent care. We’ve also been able to learn quite a bit about this rare and illusive species of sea turtle. At The Turtle Hospital, Bender loves to stir around on the bottom of our natural salt water pool as she tries to camouflage with the sandy bottom. She’s can also be found resting underneath her buddy Rebel and loves her special treats of squid stuffed with shrimp!

The Turtle Hospital:  Bath time for Bender!

This beautiful, adult female Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle is the rarest type of sea turtle in the world! In 2005, Bender became tangled in fishing line and was hit by a boat. Luckily, she was rescued and nursed back to health, but her injuries proved too severe for her to be safely returned to the wild.

Bender serves as an ambassador for her species and helps to educate thousands of visitors every year while in our permanent care. We’ve also been able to learn quite a bit about this rare and illusive species of sea turtle.

At The Turtle Hospital, Bender loves to stir around on the bottom of our natural salt water pool as she tries to camouflage with the sandy bottom. She’s can also be found resting underneath her buddy Rebel and loves her special treats of squid stuffed with shrimp!

turtleconservancy
turtleconservancy:

A young Pig-Nosed Turtle (Carettochelys insculpta), from New Guinea and Australia, at a government facility just outside Bangkok, Thailand. 
The illegal trade in this species has grown exponentially in recent years, with Traffic’s new report estimating 1.5 to 2 million eggs being illegally collected annually. Without further protection and enforcement of current laws these captivating creatures could be in trouble.

turtleconservancy:

A young Pig-Nosed Turtle (Carettochelys insculpta), from New Guinea and Australia, at a government facility just outside Bangkok, Thailand.

The illegal trade in this species has grown exponentially in recent years, with Traffics new report estimating 1.5 to 2 million eggs being illegally collected annually. Without further protection and enforcement of current laws these captivating creatures could be in trouble.

Pig-nosed turtle is too cute for its own good, says new report
The global trade in illegal pets is booming, and at the top of its list of casualties is an adorable little turtle with a porcine snout
by Christina Russo
The global illegal animal trade is taking its toll on vulnerable species, among them a small and distinctive reptile you might have seen featured in news stories for being smuggled aboard airplanes in people’s trousers. According to a newly released report by Traffic, an international watchdog group that monitors the wildlife trade, the rare pig-nosed turtle (Carettochelys insculpta) is under dire threat from exotic pet enthusiasts.
According to Serene Chng, programme officer at Traffic’s Kuala Lumpur office, the reptile is in high demand from pet traders - including online traders - in Europe, the United States and Asia. It can be found only regionally in Australia and Papua and is categorized as “vulnerable” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species…
(read more: Guardian UK)
photograph: Rob Bulmahn/Flickr

Pig-nosed turtle is too cute for its own good, says new report

The global trade in illegal pets is booming, and at the top of its list of casualties is an adorable little turtle with a porcine snout

by Christina Russo

The global illegal animal trade is taking its toll on vulnerable species, among them a small and distinctive reptile you might have seen featured in news stories for being smuggled aboard airplanes in people’s trousers. According to a newly released report by Traffic, an international watchdog group that monitors the wildlife trade, the rare pig-nosed turtle (Carettochelys insculpta) is under dire threat from exotic pet enthusiasts.

According to Serene Chng, programme officer at Traffic’s Kuala Lumpur office, the reptile is in high demand from pet traders - including online traders - in Europe, the United States and Asia. It can be found only regionally in Australia and Papua and is categorized as “vulnerable” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species

(read more: Guardian UK)

photograph: Rob Bulmahn/Flickr

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Painted Terrapin
The beautiful and critically endangered Painted Terrapin (Batagur borneonesis) is found in several countries in South East Asia where it inhabits large river systems, estuaries and mangrove forests. 
This species is sexually dimorphic, meaning there are obvious differences between the males and females. The most notable difference is their color. During the breeding season the male’s head changes from a greyish color with orange on the top to bright white with a black-edged red patch on top! 
Females, with their plain brown coloration, may be seen nesting on the same ocean beaches used by marine turtles and both hatchlings and adults can tolerate pure saltwater for short periods of time! T
Photo credit: Andrew Brinker
(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Painted Terrapin

The beautiful and critically endangered Painted Terrapin (Batagur borneonesis) is found in several countries in South East Asia where it inhabits large river systems, estuaries and mangrove forests.

This species is sexually dimorphic, meaning there are obvious differences between the males and females. The most notable difference is their color. During the breeding season the male’s head changes from a greyish color with orange on the top to bright white with a black-edged red patch on top!

Females, with their plain brown coloration, may be seen nesting on the same ocean beaches used by marine turtles and both hatchlings and adults can tolerate pure saltwater for short periods of time! T

Photo credit: Andrew Brinker

(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

libutron
libutron:

Carolina Diamondback Terrapin - Malaclemys terrapin centrata
An attractive adult male of the Carolina Diamondback Terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin centrata (Testudines - Emydidae), a subspecies found from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to northern Florida, in the United States.
Reference: [1] 
Photo credit: ©Kevin Stohlgren | Locality: Glynn Co., Georgia, US (2013)

libutron:

Carolina Diamondback Terrapin - Malaclemys terrapin centrata

An attractive adult male of the Carolina Diamondback Terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin centrata (Testudines - Emydidae), a subspecies found from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to northern Florida, in the United States.

Reference: [1

Photo credit: ©Kevin Stohlgren | Locality: Glynn Co., Georgia, US (2013)

What an amazing find! 
A female Sundarbans River Terrapin (Batagur baska) was discovered in a family pond in Bangladesh. The turtle had been kept as a pet for 16 years. After much discussion, the turtle’s owner agreed to sell the critically endangered turtle to the team’s breeding colony, adding a seventh female and diversifying the genetic base! In this touching photo, the previous owner says good-bye to her beloved pet.
You can read more about this exceptional story here:
Turtle Survival Alliance

What an amazing find!

A female Sundarbans River Terrapin (Batagur baska) was discovered in a family pond in Bangladesh. The turtle had been kept as a pet for 16 years. After much discussion, the turtle’s owner agreed to sell the critically endangered turtle to the team’s breeding colony, adding a seventh female and diversifying the genetic base! In this touching photo, the previous owner says good-bye to her beloved pet.

You can read more about this exceptional story here:

Turtle Survival Alliance

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Chinese Pond Turtle
 The Chinese Pond Turtle (Mauremys reevesii) can be found in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and Korea. This species prefers slow moving aquatic habitats where it feeds on a variety of food. Its omnivorous diet consists of insect larvae, invertebrates, fish, carrion, algae and other aquatic plants. The Chinese Pond Turtle, also known as Reeves’ Turtle is endangered in the wild and is found in large numbers in farms in China where they are bred for the pet and food markets.
(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Chinese Pond Turtle

The Chinese Pond Turtle (Mauremys reevesii) can be found in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and Korea. This species prefers slow moving aquatic habitats where it feeds on a variety of food. Its omnivorous diet consists of insect larvae, invertebrates, fish, carrion, algae and other aquatic plants. The Chinese Pond Turtle, also known as Reeves’ Turtle is endangered in the wild and is found in large numbers in farms in China where they are bred for the pet and food markets.

(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)