More than 2,500 wolves have been killed in the Midwest and Northern Rockies where wolf protections were eliminated in 2011 and 2012.The killings will continue if the Obama administration pushes through it’s proposal remove Endangered Species Act for wolves across the U.S.
In a foreshadowing of how wolves will be managed across most of the lower 48 states if the Obama administration drops federal protections, 2,567 gray wolves have now been killed by hunters and trappers in the six states where wolf protections were eliminated in 2011 and 2012. As a result of aggressive hunting and trapping seasons in those states, roughly half the total known population of wolves in the lower 48 in 2013 has been killed, and wolf populations are now in decline…
Read more about this grim milestone here: 
Center for Biological Diversity

More than 2,500 wolves have been killed in the Midwest and Northern Rockies where wolf protections were eliminated in 2011 and 2012.

The killings will continue if the Obama administration pushes through it’s proposal remove Endangered Species Act for wolves across the U.S.

In a foreshadowing of how wolves will be managed across most of the lower 48 states if the Obama administration drops federal protections, 2,567 gray wolves have now been killed by hunters and trappers in the six states where wolf protections were eliminated in 2011 and 2012. As a result of aggressive hunting and trapping seasons in those states, roughly half the total known population of wolves in the lower 48 in 2013 has been killed, and wolf populations are now in decline…

Read more about this grim milestone here:

Center for Biological Diversity

denizensofearth
wolveswolves:

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WOLVES AND RAVENS
Ravens and wolves form social attachments with each other and take huge advantage of each other.
Both animals eat meat. When wolves killed a prey, ravens eat from the left over cadaver and scavenge it. Also, ravens lead wolves to preys or cadavers. The ravens fly and the wolves follow. Ravens also alert wolves to dangers.
They also play with each other. For example the ravens dive at the wolves and then speed away or peck their tails to try to get the wolves to chase them, or wolf cubs chasing after teasing ravens.
Dr. L. David Mech wrote in ‘The Wolf: The Ecology and Behaviour of an Endangered Species’: "It appears that the wolf and the raven have reached an adjustment in their relationships such that each creature is rewarded in some way by the presence of the other and that each is fully aware of the other’s capabilities."
Also very interesting: Bernd Heinrich wrote in ‘Mind of the Raven: Investigations and Adventures with Wolf-Birds’: "Ravens can be attracted to wolf howls. The wolves’ howls before they go on a hunt, and it is a signal that the birds learn to heed. Conversely, wolves may respond to certain raven vocalizations or behavior that indicate prey. The raven-wolf association may be close to a symbiosis that benefits the wolves and ravens alike. At a kill site, the birds are more suspicious and alert than wolves. The birds serve the wolves as extra eyes and ears."
Some videos: - Raven Dances with Wolf Pup - Ravens taking a bath in the snow after stealing food from wolves- Crow teasing a wolf
(Picture by Michael S. Nolan)

wolveswolves:

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WOLVES AND RAVENS

Ravens and wolves form social attachments with each other and take huge advantage of each other.

Both animals eat meat. When wolves killed a prey, ravens eat from the left over cadaver and scavenge it. Also, ravens lead wolves to preys or cadavers. The ravens fly and the wolves follow. Ravens also alert wolves to dangers.

They also play with each other. For example the ravens dive at the wolves and then speed away or peck their tails to try to get the wolves to chase them, or wolf cubs chasing after teasing ravens.

Dr. L. David Mech wrote in ‘The Wolf: The Ecology and Behaviour of an Endangered Species’: "It appears that the wolf and the raven have reached an adjustment in their relationships such that each creature is rewarded in some way by the presence of the other and that each is fully aware of the other’s capabilities."

Also very interesting: Bernd Heinrich wrote in ‘Mind of the Raven: Investigations and Adventures with Wolf-Birds’: "Ravens can be attracted to wolf howls. The wolves’ howls before they go on a hunt, and it is a signal that the birds learn to heed. Conversely, wolves may respond to certain raven vocalizations or behavior that indicate prey. The raven-wolf association may be close to a symbiosis that benefits the wolves and ravens alike. At a kill site, the birds are more suspicious and alert than wolves. The birds serve the wolves as extra eyes and ears."

Some videos: 
Raven Dances with Wolf Pup 
Ravens taking a bath in the snow after stealing food from wolves
Crow teasing a wolf

(Picture by Michael S. Nolan)

Just this year, poachers have killed about 10% of the remaining red wolf population in the U.S.
by Michael Graham Richard
This needs to stop before it’s too late
The Red Wolf is classified as “Critically Endangered” by the IUCN’s Red List of Endangered Species, with two out of three sub-species already extinct and only 90 to 100 individuals left in the third. To say that it is on the brink of extinction and needs protection is almost an understatement.
But things are not going well. Just this year, 9 red wolves have been killed. Just this week, authorities in North-Carolina has found 2 animals that have been shot, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has put out a $26,000 reward for any information that would help its investigation…
(read more: TreeHugger)
photo: Jim Liestman

Just this year, poachers have killed about 10% of the remaining red wolf population in the U.S.

by Michael Graham Richard

This needs to stop before it’s too late

The Red Wolf is classified as “Critically Endangered” by the IUCN’s Red List of Endangered Species, with two out of three sub-species already extinct and only 90 to 100 individuals left in the third. To say that it is on the brink of extinction and needs protection is almost an understatement.

But things are not going well. Just this year, 9 red wolves have been killed. Just this week, authorities in North-Carolina has found 2 animals that have been shot, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has put out a $26,000 reward for any information that would help its investigation…

(read more: TreeHugger)

photo: Jim Liestman

Over 75% of Large Predators Declining

by Jeremy Hance

The world’s top carnivores are in big trouble: this is the take-away message from a new review paper published today in Science. Looking at 31 large-bodied carnivore species (i.e those over 15 kilograms or 33 pounds), the researchers found that 77 percent are in decline and more than half have seen their historical ranges decline by over 50 percent. In fact, the major study comes just days after new research found that the genetically-unique West African lion is down to just 250 breeding adults…

(read more: MongaBay)

photo by Sam Fraser-Smith, Kirsten Abley, and Norman S. Smith