Red Wolf Recovery at Critical Junction

by Mitch Merry
Online Organizer Endangered Species Coalition

We have reached a critical junction in the recovery of the critically endangered red wolf (Canis rufus). The story of the red wolf is a complicated one, which has likely contributed to its anonymity. Historically distributed across the southeastern United States, the species was extirpated from much of range due to habitat loss and overharvest. Remnant populations then became threatened by hybridization with coyotes, which expanded in range as the red wolf disappeared.

In the 1970s biologists identified only 14 remaining wild red wolves in the species’ last stronghold in a coastal region on the Texas-Louisiana border. Those individuals were transported to Point Defiance Zoo in Tacoma, WA and the species was declared extinct in the wild in 1980.

Just inland from the famed Outer Banks, the five-county Albemarle-Pamlico Peninsula in eastern North Carolina was selected as the location for the first red wolf reintroduction program. At the time, there were no coyotes present in this area. The first wolves were released in 1987 and the population grew slowly. Soon coyotes rapidly colonized the state and in 1993 the first hybridization event between a red wolf and coyote was documented…

(read more: Endangered Species Coalition)

Oregon’s Lone Wolf

OR7, a lone wolf originally from northeast Oregon that has traveled to California and back to Oregon, may have found a mate in southwest Oregon’s Cascade Mountains.

In early May, remote cameras on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest captured several images of what appears to be a black female wolf in the same area where OR7 is currently located. Based on data, it appears likely that the new wolf and OR7 have paired up and may have denned. If that is correct, they would be rearing pups at this time of year.

The Service and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife probably won’t be able to confirm the presence of pups until June or later.

See the news release here: FWS - Pacific Region - Wolf

Photos by US Fish and Wildlife Service

(via: USFWS_Pacific Region)

Major discovery: Wolves help trees grow, rivers flow, countless species flourish
by Michael Graham Richard
It might not seem obvious at first, but wolves can have a huge indirect effect on ecosystems. They aren’t just good for reducing deer populations and such; they fundamentally change how these herbivores behave, where they graze and which areas they avoid.
This means that trees and plants start growing again in places that were overgrazed, giving shelter to all kinds of species (songbirds, beavers, rabbits). This in turns changes how the local ecosystem works further, providing more ecological niches to more species, until after a few years the area is almost unrecognizably more alive! All this thanks to wolves, this underrated apex predator!
Check out the great video below to see the chain of events in action after wolves were reintroduced in Yellowstone after an absence of about 70 years…
(find out more: TreeHugger)

Major discovery: Wolves help trees grow, rivers flow, countless species flourish

by Michael Graham Richard

It might not seem obvious at first, but wolves can have a huge indirect effect on ecosystems. They aren’t just good for reducing deer populations and such; they fundamentally change how these herbivores behave, where they graze and which areas they avoid.

This means that trees and plants start growing again in places that were overgrazed, giving shelter to all kinds of species (songbirds, beavers, rabbits). This in turns changes how the local ecosystem works further, providing more ecological niches to more species, until after a few years the area is almost unrecognizably more alive! All this thanks to wolves, this underrated apex predator!

Check out the great video below to see the chain of events in action after wolves were reintroduced in Yellowstone after an absence of about 70 years…

(find out more: TreeHugger)

More than 2,500 wolves have been killed in the Midwest and Northern Rockies where wolf protections were eliminated in 2011 and 2012.The killings will continue if the Obama administration pushes through it’s proposal remove Endangered Species Act for wolves across the U.S.
In a foreshadowing of how wolves will be managed across most of the lower 48 states if the Obama administration drops federal protections, 2,567 gray wolves have now been killed by hunters and trappers in the six states where wolf protections were eliminated in 2011 and 2012. As a result of aggressive hunting and trapping seasons in those states, roughly half the total known population of wolves in the lower 48 in 2013 has been killed, and wolf populations are now in decline…
Read more about this grim milestone here: 
Center for Biological Diversity

More than 2,500 wolves have been killed in the Midwest and Northern Rockies where wolf protections were eliminated in 2011 and 2012.

The killings will continue if the Obama administration pushes through it’s proposal remove Endangered Species Act for wolves across the U.S.

In a foreshadowing of how wolves will be managed across most of the lower 48 states if the Obama administration drops federal protections, 2,567 gray wolves have now been killed by hunters and trappers in the six states where wolf protections were eliminated in 2011 and 2012. As a result of aggressive hunting and trapping seasons in those states, roughly half the total known population of wolves in the lower 48 in 2013 has been killed, and wolf populations are now in decline…

Read more about this grim milestone here:

Center for Biological Diversity